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THE TRAIyNIyNG OP 
EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 
E6R THE Y6U AG A\E/N '5 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

AN ILLUSTRATED NUMBER OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL^^ 
ASSOCIATION $?V^=7 
TRAINING SCHOOlI| \v7 
<#, NOTES ^ 

CONTAI^mG 

HI[ ™ CATALOGUE 

1894-95 

WITH PROSPECTUS EOR 1895 '96 
AND 

TCiNTII ANNUAL REPORT 

OP THE 

INTERNATIONAL 
YoUNG AEN5 CHRISTIAN AOTATI?fl 
TRAI/NI/NG SCHOOL 



SPRIyNOPIELD.MASS .U S.A 




We PLAN and FIT up such SHOPS complete. 




Send for Illustrated and Descriptive Catalogues. 

B. F. STURTEVANT CO., Boston, Mass. 

Branch STORES! NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA, CHICAGO, AND LONDON. 



CATALOGUE AND ANNUAL REPORT NUMBER. 




Vol. IV. SPRINGFIELD, MASS., AUGUST, 1895. No. 6. 



Published Monthly during the School Year by the International Young Men's Christian Association 
Training School, Springfield, Mass. Subscription price Twenty-five Cents per Annum. Address all 
communications to C. F. Powlison, Editor. 

Entered at the post office at Springfield, Mass., as second-class matter March 18, 1892. 

B. E. Lovejoy, Business Manager. 



FIRST PART— Pages 3-48. 
The Tenth Catalogue, 1894-95, with Prospectus of the School for 

1895-96. 

CONTENTS ON PAGE 4. 



SECOND PART— Pages 49-59. 
The Tenth Annual Report of the School for the year ending 
June 19, 1895. 

CONTENTS ON PAGE 49. 




THE DORMITORY BEGUN. 
Comer stone laid May ro, 1895. 



1894-9^ 



TENTH CATALOGUE 



International 
Young Men's Christian Association 
Training School, 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS., U. S. A. 




WITH PROSPECTUS FOR iS95-'g6. 



CONTENTS OF THE CATALOGUE. 



PAGE 

Admission, Requirements for 40 

Bequests, Forms for 43 

Calendar, 5 

Corporators, 6 

Educational Department Course, 36-39 

Equipment, .. . 12-18 

Examinations, 42 

Expenses, Estimate of 41 

Fellowships, 42 

General Course of Instruction, 20-24 

Graduation, Conditions of 42 

Historical, 5 

Instructors, 8,9 

Object, 5 

Offheks, ..." 7 

Physical Department Course, . . . . . . . 31-35 

Practical Work, 19 

Promotions, Conditions of 42 

Rooms and Bedding, 40 

Secretarial Course, 2 5~3° 

Students 10,11 

Students now in Association Work, 45-48 

Tuition (see Expenses, page 41). 



4 



OBJECT OF THE SCHOOL. 



To train young men for the work of General Secretaries, Physical 
Directors,* Educational Directors, or other officers of Young Men's 
Christian Associations in order that the constantly extending work of the 
Young Men's Christian Associations may have the intelligent supervision 
it demands, to the end that its operations shall bring a maximum of return 
from a minimum of expenditure. 

* In view of the intimate relation held and the dominant influence exercised by the Young Men's 
Christian Associations over the religious life of the students in most of our colleges, quite a number 
of the graduates of the School's physical department, have been led to take up the work of the Chris- 
tian Physical Director in one and another of the colleges in which these Associations exist, and have 
found excellent opportunity to use the special training furnished by the School for Association 
Physical Directors. In view of this fact the School is prepared to train Christian young men of 
proper qualifications, desirous of fitting themselves for the work of the College Physical Director or 
Instructor, whether they be employed by the college corporation or by the Christian students' 
organization within the college. 



HISTORICAL. 

1885. Organized as the Young Men's Christian Association Depart- 
ment of the School for Christian Workers. 
1887. Physical Department organized. 

1890. Separately incorporated as the International Young Men's 
Christian Association Training School. 

1 891. Land purchased — 30 acres. 
1894. Gymnasium building erected. 

1894. Educational Department organized. 

1895. Dormitory building erected. 

CALENDAR. 

Regular Meetings of the Trustees on the first Wednesdays of Septem- 
ber and March, and of the Trustees and Corporation the third Wednesday 
of June. 

Fall Term - Begins Wednesday afternoon, September 11, 1895. 
( Ends Friday evening, December 20, 1895. 

Winter Term \ |^§ in * ^ iday mornin g' J a ™ ar y 3, ^96. 

( Ends r nday evening, March 20, 1896. 

^ Begins Tuesday morning, March 31, 1896. 
String Term Commencement Exercises, Wednesday evening, June 17, 
( 1896. 



The Calendar is subject to change. 

5 



CORPORATORS. 

(As constituted in the summer of 1895.) 



The names of the Trustees are italicized. 



Australia, N. S. W., Sydney, David Walker. 

" Victoria, Melbourne, H. A. Wilcox. 
Hawaiian Is., Honolulu, Hon. Henry Waterhouse. 
South Africa, Adams, Natal, Geo. B. Cowles. 
France, Pans, E. Buscarlet. 
Germany, Berlin, Count Andreas Bernstorff. 
Great Britain, England, London, M. H. Hodder. 

W. H. Mills. 
Scotland, Glasgow, W. M. Oatt*. 

Portobello, R. H. Smith. 
Ireland, Belfast, Robert McCann. 
India, Madras, W. Reierson Arbuthnot. 

" " David McConaughy, Jr. 
Japan, Tokio, John T. Swift. 
Sweden, Stockholm, Baron Edward Barnekow. 
Switzerland, Geneva, Rev. Gustave Tophel. 
British Columbia, Victoria, F. W. Teague. 
Manitoba, Winnipeg, C. M. Copeland. 

K.J.Whitla. 
T. D. Patton. 
Nova Scotia, Halifax, E. W. Gorton. 
Ontario, Toronto, F. M. Pratt. 

" * Thomas S. Cole. 
" Robert Kilgour. 
Quebec, Montreal, D. A. Budge. 

George Reid. 

D. W. Ross. 
" " F. W. Kelley. 

Alabama, Birmingham, Joseph Hardy. 
California, San Francisco, H.J. McCoy. 
Colorado, Denver, Alfred W. Chamberlin. 
" " Donald Fletcher. 

" James Naismith. 
Connecticut. Bridgeport, W. E. Colley. 

J. IV. Cook. 
Frank Russell, D.D. 
Hartford, Henry Roberts. 
New Britain, F. G. Piatt. 
Stamford, C. L. Reid. 
Georgia, Atlanta, W. Woods W 'kite. 
Illinois, Chicago, I. E. Brown. 

" " A. A. Stagg. 

Indiana, Richmond, Albert G. Shepard. 

" Indianapolis, T. A. Hildreth. 
Iowa, Des Moines, W. A. Magee. 

E. D. Sampson. 
Kansas, Topeka, E. M. Aiken. 

" " R. B. Gemmell. 
Kentucky, Louisville, J. L Wheat. 
Maryland, Baltimore, W. H. Morriss. 
Massachusetts, Amherst, Merrill E. Gates. 

Boston, R. M. Armstrong. 
" James L. Gordon. 
" Charles A. Hopkins. 
" H. M. Moore. 
Campello, Preston B. Keith. 
Fitchburg, Frederick Fosdick. 

T. E. McDonald. 
Lynn, George E. Day. 
Manchester, Russell Sturgis. 
Nantucket, E. A. Lawrence. 
Springfield, Dr. IV. F. Andrews. 
Fred W. Atkinson. 
' ' Charles H. Barrows. 
" H.H.Bowman. 
' J. T. Bowne. 
" George D. Chamberlain. 
" D. F. Graham. 
E. Porter Dyer. 
Luther Gulick, M.D. 
" Henry S. Lee. 
" John life Fethr res. 
" Arthur G. Merriam. 
" Oliver C. Morse. 



Massachusetts, Springfield, Rev. D. A . Reed. 
" " C. H. Southworth. 

Wilbraham, W. R. Newhall. 
Worcester, William Wood-ward. 
Michigan, Detroit, H. G. Van Tuyl. 
Minnesota, Minneapolis, C. E. Dyer. 

St. Paul, Thomas Cochran. 
Missouri, Kansas City, Witten McDonald. 
" St. Louis, George T. Coxhead. 
" " Thomas S. McPheeters. 

Nebraska, Omaha, J. C. Denise, M.D. 

" Yutan, Robert Weidensall. 
New Hampshire, Concord, Allen Folger. 
New Jersey, Newark, Aaron Carter. 

New YSr\.ms\\\c\i, Frank L.J avewi 1 1 
Plainfield, C. W. McCutchen. 
" " W. D. Murray. 

Summit, Charles B. Grant. 
New York, Addison, Burton G. Winton. 
" Albany, Clarence Valentine. 

Brooklyn, F. B. Pratt. 

F. B. Schenck. 
" Edwin F. See. 
" Buffalo, Henry Bond. 

" " S. M. Clement. 

H. D. Dickson. 
" John B. Squire. 
" Clifton Springs, John H. Elliott. 

Geneva, T. C. Maxwell. 
Jamestown, W. A. Keeler. 
Medina, W. A. Bowen. 
New York, Thomas K. Cree. 
C. C. Cuyler. 
" F. S. Goodman. 

" George A. Hall. 

" " Richard C. Morse. 

J. Gardner Smith, M.D. 
" " Erskine Uhl. 

" " George A . War burton. 

" " A. J. D. Wedemever. 

L. D. Wishard. 
" Troy, C. W. Dietrich. 

" " L. E. Gurley. 

North Carolina, Charlotte, L. A. Coulter. 

" Davidson College, Prof. H. L. Smith. 

Ohio, Cincinnati, H. P. Llovd. 

H. Thane Miller. 
Oregon, Portland, Noel H. Jacks. 
Pennsylvania, Berwick, C. H. Zehnder. 
" Erie, C W. Davenport. 

" Philadelphia, John H. Converse. 

" " Thomas DeWitt Cuyler. 

" " Rev. Wallace MacMullen. 

Pittsburg, S. P. Harbison. 
" " Benjamin Thaw. 

" Scranton, H. M. Boies. 

Uniontown, A. W. Lunbeck. 
Rhode Island, Providence, H. S. Conant. 
South Carolina, Charleston, A. T. Jamison. 

" Columbia, A. T. Smythe. 

Tennessee, Chattanooga, J. B. Milligan. 
" Knoxville, James H. Cowan. 

" Nashville, James Bowron. 

J. B. O'Bryan. 
Texas, Dallas, A. F. Hardie. 

" Fort Worth, William C Winthrop. 
" Galveston, H. L. Smith. 
Vermont, Brattleboro, J. J. Estey. 

" Burlington, W. J. Van Patten. 
" Montpelier, A. J. Howe. 
Virginia, Clifton Forge, G. H. Winslow. 

" Richmond, Joseph Bryan. 
Washington, Seattle, E. C. Kilbourne. 
" Spokane, Walter Hughsou. 

6 



OFFICERS, 1895-6. 



President. 

CHAS. H. BARROWS, Springfield, Mass. 

Vice-President. 
PRESTON B. KEITH, Campello, Mass. 

Treasurer. 

GEO. D. CHAMBERLAIN, Springfield, Mass. 

Recording Secretary. 
F. W. MEYER, Springfield, Mass. 

Corresponding Secretary. 
OLIVER C. MORSE, Springfield, Mass. 

Executive Committee. 

Dr. W. F. Andrews, Springfield, Mass. 
H. H. Bowman, Springfield, Mass. 
Russell Sturgis, Boston, Mass. 
Erskine Uhl, New York, N. Y. 
with the President, Treasurer, and Corresponding Secretary, ex officio. 

Building Committee. 

John McFethries, Springfield, Mass. 
Geo. D. Chamberlain, Springfield, Mass. 

D. F. Graham, Springfield, Mass. 
J. T. Bownf, Springfield, Mass. 
Chas. A. Hopkins, Boston, Mass. 
Fred S. Goodman, New York, N. Y. 

with President and Corresponding Secretary. 

Committee on Instruction. 

E. Porter Dyer, Springfield, Mass. 
Fred W. Atkinson, Springfield, Mass. 
W. R. Newhall, Wilbraham, Mass. 

F. B. Pratt, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
H. M. Moore, Boston, Mass. 
R. C. Morse, New York, N. Y. 

7 



INSTRUCTORS. 



GENERAL COURSE. 



Oliver C. Morse, 



219 Florida Street. 



In charge of Bible Department. 



James M. Gray, 



Boston, Mass. 



The English Bible. Synthetic Study of the Old and New Testaments. His- 
tory of the Bible, including Genuineness, Authenticity, Canon, 
etc., Principles of Interpretation and Practical Use. 

F. N. Seerley, M. D., 10 Merrick Avenue. 

Matt as an Individual, including Anatomy and Physiology, Psychology, Per- 
sonal Purity, First Aid to the Injured. 

Haxford M. Burr, 159 Princeton Street. 



Charles F. Powlison, 

Training Class Methods with Practical Application. Abridged Course in the 
Histoiy and Principles of the Young Men's Christian Association 
for Students in the Physical and Educational Departments. 

E. Porter Dyer, Editor " Springfield Union." 

The English Language — its correct use : Writing for the Pi-ess, Proof 
Reading; Reports, etc, 

Philip H. Buechlek, Boston, Mass. 



Ethics. Sociology. Pedagogy. Outlines of Church History. 
Christian Evidences. 



Vocal Music. 



SECRETARIAL DEPARTMENT. 



J. T. Bowne, Supt. of Dept., - - - 121 Northampton Avenue. 

Unabridged Course in the History, Scope, Organization, and Methods of 
the Young Men's Christian Association. 

8 



PHYSICAL 



DEPARTMENT. 



Luther Gulick, M.D., Supt. of Dept., "The Pines," Alden Street. 

Physiology of Exercise ; Gymnastics and Athletics. 

James H. McCurdv, M.D., 

Bodily Mechanics, Physical Examination, Theory and Practice of 
Physical Department Work. 

Winfred E. Allen (Fellow), .... 

Assistant in Physiology and Practical Work. 

EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT. 
D. F. Graham, Supt. of Dept., Alden Street. 

Theory and Practice of Educational Department Work. 

(Fellow), 

Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics. 



SPECIAL LECTURERS. 



James McConaugiiy, M.A., .... Mount Hermon, Mass. 

A short course on Bible Scenes and the History of the Bible, illustrated 
by the stereopticon and suggestive of the use of the stere- 
opticon in Bible teaching. 

Charles H. Barrows, 68 Walnut Street. 

Courses on Business Law and Civil Government. 



9 



STUDENTS, 1894-5. 



SECRETARIAL DEPARTMENT. 



SENIORS. 



Austin. Lewis Seybolt, 
Cobleigh, Irving Vasa, 
Dudley, Joseph Matthews, 
Freer, Harvey Washington, 
McGown, Chester Stowe, 
Martin, Charles Alvin, 
Maylott, Worthy Francis, 
Merrill, Frank Herbert. 
Mogge, Ernest Louis, 
Moyer, Elkanah DeWilla, 
Page, John, 

Rogers, Josiah Winslow, Jr., 



Paterson, N. J. 
Washington, D. C. 
Clifton Forge, Va. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Lynn, Mass. 
Orange, Mass. 
Thompsonville, Conn, 
Nashua, N. H. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Robesonia, Pa. 
Palmer, Mass. 
Beverly, Mass. 



JUNIORS. 



Brierley, James Alfred, 
Eagleson, Archie Charles, 
Gay, Ernest Gordon, 
Gunn, Fred Willis, 
Herdman, John Robert, 
Lee, Charles Henry, 
Lovejoy, Bertram Eugene, 
Monroe, Edwin DeWitt, 
Pirazzini, Agide, 
Pogue, Elliott Samuel, 
Ridgeway, John William, 
Simons, Eltham Leslie, 



Holyoke, Mass. 
Cold Springs, Ontario. 
Hudson, Mass. 
Keene, N. H. 
Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. 
Providence, R. I. 
Keene, N. H. 
Auburn, N. Y. 
Rome, Italy. 
Fincastle, Va. 
Montreal, Canada. 
St. Thomas, Ontario. 



i o 



PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



SENIORS. 

Allen, Winfred Emery, 

Bartlett, Reuel Earnest, 

Denman, Wm. Van Benschoten, 

Durand, William Balch, 

Killam, Frank, 

Oller, Lawrence Shannon, 

Ruggles, Edwin Pakenham, 

Russell, Walter Burton, 

Wall, Charles Fitzgerald Butler 



Indianapolis, Ind. 
New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Hasbrouck, N. Y. 
Maiden, Mass. 
Yarmouth, N. S. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
Milton, Mass. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Holy Cross, Ireland. 



juniors. 

Abbey L W 

Bartlett, Ernest Prescott, 
Bursley, Charles McClellan, 
Fulton, Robert Newcomb, 
Googtns, Clinton Hallett, 
Greenwald, James Andrew, 
Huntress, Louis Mavnard, 
Mason, Lucius Julius, 
Messer, Louis Adolphus, 
Otto, Henry Ladd, 
Powter, Charles Barrett, 
Price, Charles Herbert, 
schoerke, bernhard alexander, 
Smith, Aurelius Blanchard, 
Sterner, Geo. Brinton McClellan, 

STOLTE, DlEDKICH, Jr., 



Burlington, Vt. 
Sunapee, N. H. 
Bridgeton, Me. 
Beaver Falls, Pa. 
Somerville, Mass. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Brattleboro, Vt. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Montreal, Can. 
St. Stephen, N. B. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Albany, N. Y. 
Gettysburg, Pa. 
Brattleboro, Vt. 



1 1 



EQUIPMENT. 




The dormitory building will contain on 
the first floor, two large class rooms and 
one small, a large social or conversation 
room, to be known as the " Jubilee Room " ; 
two reception rooms, one for the faculty, 
and the other for visitors ; three rooms for 
library and reading purposes, and six for 
offices. 

The three upper floors will contain rooms for sixty-four students. 

Each floor will be provided with lavatories, bath tubs, etc., while the 
fourth floor will contain a dining room and kitchen for the use of the 
students' boarding club. 

In the basement there will be large rooms for chemical and physical 
laboratories, a bicycle room and storeroom, besides the furnace and engine 
for operating the heating and ventilating fan. 




MASSASOIT LAKE, FROM THE DORMITORY BUILDING. 
12 



EQUIPMENT. 



13 




THE GYMNASIUM — OFFICE AND EXAMINING ROOM. 
Equipped with various anthropometric instruments, charts, photographs, etc. 




SOUTH END VIEW. 




THE GRAND STAND. 



i6 



EQUIPMENT. 




SCHOOL BOATS. 



The Gymna- 
sium erected for 
exclusively nor- 
mal purposes. 
Floor 48x74, free 
from posts, hav- 
ing the usual ap- 
paratus, and in 
addition, Swedish 
boms, hand ball 
court, class 
climbing ropes, 
seven needle 
baths with hot 
and cold water, 
lockers 18x18x48 



in., combination 
locks, physiol- 
ogy and psychol- 
ogy class rooms, 
e x a m i n i n g 
room, library — 
one of the best of 
its kind in the 
country. 

Football and 
team ball are 
amply provided 
for within the 
quarter- mile 
track. Grand- 





stand, bicycle 
shed, tennis 
court, rings for 
hammer throw, 
high jump and 
pole va u 1 1 , 
standards, 
straightaway for 
100 yards dash 
— all are pro- 
vided for. 

Such a nat- 
ural combination 
of advantages is 



EQUIPMENT. 



rarely found in one spot — level athletic grounds bordering on a winding 
lake two and one-half miles long, a sand beach for bathing — all overlooked 
by the dormitory and gymnasium buildings. A fringe of trees surrounds 

the track and 
gives shade for 
the tennis courts. 

The School 
owns an excellent 
fleet of boats, 
used on the Con- 
necticut river, 




ENGINE AND ELECTRIC LIGHT ROOM. 



consisting of two 
four oared work 
boats, one four- 
oared gig, two 
double gigs, one 
single gig, one 
single scull, two 
birch bark canoes, 
one light rowboat, 
one sailingsharpy. 

A most valuable part of the equipment is the School Library containing 
upwards of a thou- 
sand volumes and 
several thousand 
pamphlets. This 
includes one of 
the finest collec- 
tions on the work 
of the Young 
Men's Christian 
Association and 
Physical Train- 
ing to be found. 

The equip- 
ment of the en- 
gine room con- 
sists of one ten 
horse power gas 
engine, one four 

horse power gas engine, also 150 light no volt generator used to light 
the gymnasium, dormitory buildings, and grounds. 

The Woodworking Room is supplied with complete sets of cabinet 
making tools, wood lathes, machine planer, cut off and rip saw, pattern 




WOODWORKING ROOM. 



1 8 



EQUIPMENT. 



maker's trimmer, and is first-class in every respect. This room will accom- 
modate nine students working at one time. 

The Forging Room is equipped with two stationary power blast forges, 

one hand forge, 
smoke exhausting 
blower, blower 
for forge, power 
drill press, vises, 
etc. This room 
will accommodate 
seven students 
working at one 
time. 

The Machine 
Room contains 
engine and speed 
lathes, shop 
cut off saw, emery 
grinders, vises 
and vise benches, 
complete sets of 
This room accommodates 




MACHINE ROOM. 



twist drills, standard reamers, taps, dies, etc 
eight students at one time. 

The Physical Laboratory is equipped with air pump and appliances 
for making all 
tests in specific 
gravity, momen- 
tum of falling 
bodies, also appa- 
ratus for the car- 
rying on of all 
experiments in 
matter, dynamics, 
heat, and to some 
extent electricity, 
magnetism, and 
sound. 

The Chemi- 
cal Laboratory is 
equipped with 
fi n e, accurate 
scales for quanti- 
tative analysis, flasks, thermometers, jars, retorts, and all the appa- 
ratus necessary to carry on complete laboratory work as outlined in the 
course. 




FORGING ROOM. 



PRACTICAL WORK. 



with and 
minutes 



The School 
stands for the 
most thorough 
practical aswellas 
theoretical train- 
ing. The com- 
pletely equipped 
building of the 
Springfield Asso- 
ciation, recently 
finished, affords 
unsurpassed op- 
portunities for 
practical work in 
a city of medium 
size (5o,ooo),while 
several aggres- 
sive Associations, 
without buildings, in smaller towns, can be reached within a few 
by electric connections. 




NEW BUILDING OK THE SPRINGFIELD ASSOCIATION. 




RECEPTION HALL OF SPRINGFIELD ASSOCIATION. 
19 



THE GENERAL COURSE. 



The course of instruction covers three years, and is planned so that 
students preparing to be general secretaries take a complete and general 
view of the whole field. Those preparing for the Physical and Educational 
Departments take a less thorough view of the whole, but a far more thor- 
ough study of their special departments. 

OUTLINE OF BIBLE STUDY. 

Synthetic Study of the Scriptures. 

The aim of this study, to which four terms of the course are to be 
devoted, is to obtain, after careful and frequent reading of the several books 
of the Bible, a knowledge of its character and contents, and a basis for 
judging of its authority, derived from direct personal contact with the Bible 
itself. In this way the Bible is allowed to tell its own story and to make its 
own impression. 

The History of the Bible. 

This will afford a glimpse into the times and circumstances in and 
under which its messages were delivered and its books written and com- 
piled, covering questions of genuineness, authenticity, the canon, the higher 
criticism, etc. 

Principles of Scripture Interpretation. 

This course is designed to cover the peculiarities and idioms of the 
languages in which the Scriptures were originally composed, to help the 
student rightly to understand and to explain the Bible. 
Practical Use and Application of Scripture Teaching, 
or the use of the Scriptures by the Christian worker, both in public and in 
private : — 

(i) Through lectures and conversations; (2) through Bible training 
class work ; and (3) through Bible teaching in Sunday-schools and public 
addresses at deputation services, etc. 

Evidences of Christianity. 

The object of this course is to show the reasonableness of Christianity 
or the religion of the Bible, and its claims for acceptance, that the student 
may the more clearly apprehend the grounds of his own faith in the religion 
of Jesus Christ, and that he may be the better prepared to present them to 
others so as to confirm their faith, or meet their doubts and answer their 
objections. 

20 



THE GENERAL COURSE. 



21 



( Outlines of Chin- eh History. 

To show, in brief, the progress and development of the church in its 
different divisions and branches from the days of the apostles down to the 
present time. 

THE STUDY OF MAN. 

OBJECT. 

The object of this course is to give each man a knowledge and appre- 
ciation of his own constitution and powers, physical, intellectual, and spirit- 
ual, leading up to the study of his relations to himself, to his fellow men, 
and to his God ; that he may develop himself, and that he may be able 
intelligently to deal with others, helping them to perfect themselves. It is 
taken by all the students. 

THE STUDIES. 

The course includes the following studies in outline : — 

Physics. 

The laws that govern gases will be studied, that the whole theory of 
respiration may be thoroughly understood ; the laws governing liquids, to 
give a clear comprehension of the physiology of digestion and circulation. 
The study of solids will be from the standpoint of mechanics j this will give 
a basis for a thorough study of the different gymnastic and athletic events, 
from both the hygienic and economic standpoints. 

This study will conclude with a view of the laws of the universe as a 
whole, leading the student to recognize God in all things. 

Chemistry. 

The chemistry of the constituent elements of the body will be taken up, 
with especial reference to the foods that ought to be used, particularly in 
" training," and in making the weak strong ; a brief view of the process of 
crystallization will also be taken. 

Biology, 

The next step is a view of the principles of biology, bringing in enough 
of botany and zoology to show man's place in the organized world, and his 
relation to the other creatures. 

Anatomy. 

The structure of man will be treated of in such a way as to give a work- 
ing knowledge of the bones as levers, the muscles as powers, and the nerves 
which furnish the stimulus to action. 

Physical Measiire7?ienis. 

A study of the different measurements of the body and how to take 
them, giving a basis for the teaching of athletics from a mechanical stand- 
point, for prescription of exercise, the principles of which will also be 
taught, and furnishing data for anthropometric charts. 



22 THE GENERAL COURSE. 

Physiology. 

This study will include the arrangement of the vital organs, with a care- 
ful study of their functions, and the causes which affect their operations. 
Muscular action will receive special attention, emphasis being laid upon 
the relation of exercise to the different functions of the body. The ner- 
vous system will also be carefully treated. 
Hygiene. 

Considered in connection with physiology, and consisting of a study 
of the best methods of preserving the body in a healthy condition. 

Personal Purity. 

This subject will be carefully treated from the physiological, psycho- 
logical and ethical standpoints. 

Training. 

A discussion of the best ways of making the most of the active powers, 
with consideration of the different systems in vogue. 
First Aid to the Injured. 

A course fitting the men to care for injured persons till medical assist- 
ance arrives. 

Psychology. 

This subject comprises a study of the brain and its functions, of sen- 
sation, perception, the stream of thought, association of ideas, habit, mem- 
ory, imagination, reasoning, production of movement (considered from the 
psychological point of view), the natural and moral affections, the will, the 
religious feelings, worship, etc. 

Following this study of man as an individual, comes the study of man 
in his relationships : — 
Ethics. 

The course in ethics will lay the foundation for the work in Applied 
Ethics or Sociology. Special emphasis will be laid upon the Bible law of 
duty, which must be applied to all the problems of sociology. The text- 
book will be Dr. Mark Hopkins' " Law of Love and Love as Law." 

Applied Ethics or Sociology. 

" That gospel, which in its highest unity is love, is divided into two 
parts : the first is Theology, which is an elaboration of the first part of 
Christ's epitome of the law, 'Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy 
heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength ' ; 
the second is Sociology — the science of society — which is an elaboration of 
the second part of the epitome of the law, ' Thou shalt love thy neighbor as 
thyself. ' "—Richard T. Ely. 

The object of the course is twofold : — 

(i) To acquaint the Association worker with the nature and extent of 
the social problems of the age, especially such problems as will most con- 
cern him in his special field of work. 



THE GENERAL COURSE. 



^3 



(2) To suggest the nature and use of those principles and forces which 
may be brought to the solution of these problems. 

The student will have the opportunity of studying the social problems 
of the day from a practical, Christian, and, at the same time, scientific stand- 
point. 

Instruction will be given by lectures, carefully prepared courses of 
reading, and class debates, to some of which the entire School will be 
invited. The general outline is as follows : — 

I. Christian sociology as a science — its scope and relation to kindred 
sciences. 

II. The relation of the Christian church to social science and social 
problems. 

III. The relation of the Young Men's Christian Association to the 
same. 

IV. Some of the Social Problems — relation of labor and capital, 
poverty, pauperism, crime, intemperance. 

V. Some of the Social Forces — heredity, environment, habit, custom, 
public opinion, laws, education, Christianity. 

Pedagogy or the Art and Science of Teaching. 

The course in Pedagogy has been shaped so as to give the student some 
of the fundamentals of the art and scie?ice of teaching. 

The following will indicate the general scope of the course, which will 
be pursued by lecture, text-book, and selected readings: — 

I. The aim of education. 

II. The development of modern educational methods. 

III. The psychology of teaching. 

IV. The scope of the educational work of the Association. 

V. The arrangement of courses of study and the forming of classes. 
( Normal work.) 

VI. The selection of teachers. 

VII. The choice and use of text-books. 

VIII. The educational use of books and current literature. 

IX. The Bible class. 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Taken by all students, but under different instructors, the secretarial 
students taking it with special reference to the duties of the general secre- 
taryship, and the educational and physical students taking it with special 
reference to the educational and physical directorship. 

The outline will cover: — 

1. The field, objects, and history — including limitations, principles, 
aim, and growth. 

2. The organization and its home — including the constitution, quali- 
fications and duties of officers and committees, the membership, salaried 
officers, buildings, and how to secure them. 



24 



THE GENERAL COURSE. 



3. Methods of work by departments — including business manage- 
ment, Bible and training classes, and religious meetings, educational, phys- 
ical, social, information, and relief, and boys' work, work among special 
classes of men, women's work for young men. 

4. General supervision and extension — including district, state, pro- 
vincial, and international agencies. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Language. 

Object : The correct use of the English language in speaking, writ- 
ing, and reading. 

Method : Lectures and class-room instruction, with practice in speak- 
ing, reading, correspondence, writing for the press, proof reading, reports, 
and minutes of meetings. 
Business Law and Civil Government. 

Lectures on Business Law, covering briefly contracts, commercial 
paper, indorsers — their liability, responsibility of minors, description of a 
suit, effect of a judgment, etc. 

Lectures on Civil Government, covering briefly those features with 
which all leaders of men in the United States and Canada should be 
acquainted. 
Vocal Music. 

Object : To acquaint the Association leader with the mission and in- 
fluence of music in its appeal to the sensibilities, to the end that this 
powerful agency for the conveyance of truth may be effectively applied in 
the work of the Associations. 

Method : Lectures and class-room instruction, with practice, cover- 
ing the principles of vocal technique, laws of musical expression, and im- 
portant relation of text to form. 



SECRETARIAL COURSE. 



Object: — Training for the Special Duties of the General 
Secretaryship. 

The following is in addition to the General Course outlined on pages 20-24. 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

The Field and its Limits. 

The work, why needed. A definite work by and for young men. The 
aim distinctively religious. Relation to the church. Relation to other 
religious societies. 

The Rise and Growth of the Associations. 

Origin of the present movement. Earlier work for young men. Intro- 
duction into America and work prior to the Civil War. Army work. De- 
velopment of the work. 

The Organization- 

When and how to organize. The constitution. Branches and sub- 
organizations. The directors and officers — their qualifications and duties. 
Standing committees— their importance, enlistment, and composition, how 
to organize, the chairman, principles and methods of construction, names 
and duties. 
The Membership. 

Classes. How to secure members. The membership committee. How 
to retain members. Fees, tickets, records, and exchange. Development 
of active members. The associate membership, and its relations. The 
members' meeting. 

The dene)- a I Secretary. 

His relation to churches and pastors, to officers, directors, and com- 
mittees, to other employees, to the business community, to his fellow secre- 
taries. Accepting a call. Beginning work. Correspondence. System. 
Statistics. Studying human nature. Dress. Conversation. Economy. 
Ladies' company. Health. Growth — spiritually, intellectually, and socially. 
Securing and training employed officers — demand and supply, methods of 
training. 

The Association Home. 

Advantages of owning a building, location, arrangement, construction, 
equipment. The care of the home — repairs and safety, order and cleanli- 
ness. How to get a building — preparatory work, the canvass, cautions. 
The building movement, its beginning and growth. 

2 5 



26 



SECRETARIAL COURSE. 



The Business Management . 

Current finances — the annual budget, income, solicitation, collection, 
and disbursement, financial bookkeeping. Real estate and endowment 
funds — incorporation, trustees, endowment, debt, taxes, insurance, leases. 
Records and advertising — recording statistics, anniversaries, parlor con- 
ferences, printed matter, the bulletin, annual reports. 
The Religious Department. 

The Bible in Association Work : individual study — objects, methods, 
and helps; class study — a Bible class indispensable, relation of the general 
secretary, beginners' advanced and training classes, true place and appli- 
ances, the teacher, the class, the topics, preparing the lesson, teaching the 
lesson. Practical work with the unconverted — personal work, the evange- 
listic Bible class, the Bible in the evangelistic meeting; Bible readings. 
Religious meetings, etc. — the evangelistic meeting, other meetings at the 
rooms; meetings outside the rooms — in boarding houses, in public institu- 
tions ; sermons to young men; distribution of religious reading matter; the 
invitation committee. 
TJie Educational Department . 

The reading room — furniture, supervision, papers, and periodicals. 
The library — its importance and place in the Association, how to develop, 
apartments and furniture, management, selecting and buying books, classi- 
fication, cataloguing, shelf listing, binding and repairing, advertising, regis- 
tration and charging, reference books, courses of reading, aids to readers. 
Educational classes — the need, branches taught, adaptation, thoroughness, 
frequency of sessions, instructors, class rooms, examinations. Literary 
societies, etc. — value, various forms of organization and work, how super- 
vised. Lectures and talks— the use and abuse of lectures, home talent, prac- 
tical talks. The educational director — qualifications, work, and relationships. 

Note. — The subject of educational class work is greatly enlarged upon 
and practically illustrated by special work under Mr. Graham. See page 28. 
The Physical Department. 

Aim of the department — health, education, recreation. Conditions 
under which a physical department should be organized. Scientific equip- 
ment and methods — examinations, statistics, prescription of exercise. 
Practical equipment and methods — location and arrangement of gymna- 
sium, bath and dressing rooms, outfit, methods. Outdoor work. The 
physical director. The department committee. 

Note. — For extensions of the theory and practice of physical work, see 
page 27. 

T/ie Social Department. 

The reception committee. The social rooms. Social entertainments. 
The Department of Information and Relief. 

Boarding houses. Employment bureau. Savings bureau. Benefit 
fund. Visiting the sick. Destitute young men. 



SECRETARIAL COURSE. 



27 



The Boys' Department '. 

Necessity, aim, and benefit. Organization and relationships. Different 
classes of boys. Supervision. Methods and agencies — religious, educa- 
tional, physical, and social. 
The Work among Speeial Classes of Men. 

College students — history, organization, methods, outgrowths. Rail- 
road men — history, aim and benefits, organization and finance, rooms and 
methods. Commercial travelers — the field, work, and agencies. Other 
nationalities- and races — the field, the German work, the colored work, etc. 
Miscellaneous classes — soldiers and sailors, mutes, lumbermen, firemen, 
street car employees, etc. 

Women's Work for Young Men. 
Organization and methods. 

State and Provincial Work. 

The state committee. Finances. The state secretary. The state 
convention — preparatory work by the state committee, preparatory work by 
the local Association, at the convention. The district work — the commit- 
tee, conferences, intervisitation, corresponding members. The relation of 
the local Association and secretary to the general work of supervision and 
extension. 

The American International Work. 

History and organization. The field. The work — supervision and ex- 
tension, correspondence, publications, securing and training employed 
officers, aid to building enterprises, aid in securing funds, aid to state and 
other conventions, help in disaster. Secretaries of the committee. Inter- 
national finances. International conventions. Day and week of prayer. 
Work among young men in foreign lands — policy, relationships, methods. 

The World's .1 Ilia nee. 

History, organization, and work. 

Text Book. 

" Handbook of the History, Organization, and Methods of Work of 
Young Men's Christian Associations — Edition of 1892." This book was 
prepared primarily for the use of this School. 

PHYSICAL WORK. 

'Theory. 

Anatomy, physical measurements, physiology, hygiene, personal purity, 
and first aid to the injured, are outlined under the " Study of Man," in the 
General Course on pages 21, 22. 

Practice. 

Calisthenics. Use of developing apparatus. 

Light gymnastics, including dumb-bells, wands, Indian clubs, etc. A 
calisthenic, dumb-bell, and bar bell drill will be committed to memory. 



2 8 



SECRETARIAL COURSE. 



Heavy gymnastics, vaulting, horizontal and parallel bars, horse, buck, 

etc. 

Athletics, walking, running, jumping, throwing the hammer, putting 
the shot, pole vaulting, baseball, football, lawn tennis. 

Class work, especially adapted to the needs of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Associations, on all of the apparatus, will be committed by the stu- 
dents. 

Recreative gymnastics and the various gymnastic games receive 
special attention, basket ball, newcomb, etc. 

Swimming and diving will receive attention. The various strokes will 
be taught and practiced. Also the rescuing of the drowning and the right- 
ing of a capsized boat. 

The elements of rowing and paddling will be taught. 

Several times during the course, the students form a camp (generally 
going by boat) thus learning how to construct a camp, erect tents, build 
fires for camp cookery, and other similar details. 

EDUCATIONAL WORK. 

Theory. 

Class-room work extending through the first and second years in com- 
mercial, political, scientific, industrial, language, and miscellaneous subjects, 
giving information that will enable the general secretary to judge of a right 
or wrong course of study, as well as the branches suited to a particular 
field. The peculiar needs of manufacturing and commercial communities 
will be fully considered and suggestions made regarding the adaptation of 
class work to meet these needs. 
Practice. 

Practice will be given in the chemical and mechanical laboratories, 
taking up courses as outlined for conducting classes in carpentry, pattern 
making, forging, tempering, chipping, filing, machine tool work, and ma- 
chine tool construction, giving the student a useful and practical train- 
ing that will enable him to understand the industrial work now so much in 
demand, and also intelligently to plan for and if need be supervise the work 
of this important department. 

PRACTICE. 

All methods of work treated in the secretarial course are fully illus- 
trated by approved blanks and printed matter, and as often as possible 
practice is required. 

In addition to the extended practice in the physical and educational 
work of the School, the secretarial students are required to unite and work 
with the Springfield Young Men's Christian Association throughout the 
entire course, to do regular service on one or more of the Association's 
standing committees and to attend all stated meetings of the committees to 
which appointed. 



SECRETARIAL COURSE. 



29 



Each is required to unite with the literary society and to participate in 
its work. 

Each is required, unless excused, to attend at least one young men's 
meeting weekly and if possible regularly to teach a Bible class. 

All are given practice in using the library ; in preparing reports of 
committees, minutes of meetings, items for newspapers and bulletins, 
printers' copy and proof reading ; are expected to attend each year at least 
two Association conventions, and to report the same in writing upon their 
return. 

Frequent delegations of students are assigned to conduct services for 
young men in the towns and villages of the Eighth Association District of 
Massachusetts. Upon their graduation, fully one half the class of '95 en- 
gaged in this work for several weeks in New Hampshire and Vermont 
under the direction of one of the secretaries of the International Commit- 
tee. 

LIBRARIES. 

During the entire course the students will have access to the Spring- 
field City Library of more than 80,000 volumes, to the School Library and 
to the Historical Library of the American Young Men's Christian Associ- 
ations ; and will also be required to engage in special courses of reading in 
connection with the department work. 

THE COURSE BY YEARS. 

First year. 

The Bible, see p. 20; Physiology, see p. 22; Hygiene, see p. 22; 
English composition, etc., see p. 24; Physics, see p. 21 ; Chemistry, see p. 
21 ; Vocal Music, see p. 24 ; Practical work in the local Y. M. C. A. 'sand in 
the Physical and Educational laboratories of the School, see p. 28. 

Second year. 

The Bible, see p. 20 ; Nerve Physics, see p. 22 ; Psychology, see p. 
22; Business Law and Civil Government, see p. 24 ; The Young Men's 
Christian Association— its field, objects, and history, the organization and 
its home, see p. 25 ; Theory and practice in the Physical and Educational 
Departments of the School, see pp. 27-28; Practice in the local Y. M. 
C. A.'s, p. 28. 

Third year . 

The Bible, see p. 20; Ethics, see p. 22; Sociology, see p. 22; Peda- 
gogy, see p. 23 ; The Young Men's Christian Association — methods of 
local work by departments, state and international supervision and exten- 
sion, see pp. 26-27 ; Practice in the Y. M. C. A.'s of Springfield and vicinity. 

SPECIAL LECTURES AND CONFERENCES, 1894-5. 
L. L. DociGETT, State Secretary of Ohio, "Association Work in Germany." 
J. R. Mott, College Secretary of the International Committee, " Bible 
Study for General Growth." 



30 



SECRETARIAL COURSE. 



Geo. B. Hodge, Educational Secretary of the International Committee, 
" The Development of Association Educational Work," illustrated by 
the Association Exhibit at the Columbian Exposition. 

Chas. T. Kissam, Plainfield, N. J., " Financial Management." 

Claus Olandt, Secretary of the International Committee, " Recent Ex- 
periences in Evangelistic Work." 

E. Porter Dyer, Editor Springfield Union, " The Secretary and the 
Newspapers." 

Dr. Chas. A. Eastman, Secretary of the International Committee, "Asso- 
ciation Work among the Dakota Indians." 

Geo. M. Hersey of Hartford, " Experience in Canvassing for and Erect- 
ing an Association Building." 

Rev. John H. Elliott of Chicago, " Power for Service." 

The Secretarial Students attended the following conferences and con- 
ventions: — 

April 19-21, 1895. Connecticut Valley District Conference at North- 
ampton. 

May 8-12, 1895. International Convention, Springfield, Mass. 
May 13-16, 1895. Conference of North American Secretaries' Asso- 
ciation, Hartford, Conn. 



For admission and expenses, see pp. 40. 41. 



PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Object:— The Training of Men for the Work of the Physical 
Directorship. 

This department of the School offers rare opportunities for a " nor- 
mal Christian physical education." 

LOCATION. 

There is no part of the country where athletics are so much fostered, 
where the college athletic teams are better trained, or where the local 
Young Men's Christian Associations are more vigorous in their physical 
work, than in the associations and colleges of New England. 

The students visit the majority of the following named first-class 
gymnasiums during their course : The Association Gymnasiums at Wor- 
cester, Boston, Cambridge, Holyoke, Hartford, New York, 23d Street, Har- 
lem, Brooklyn. College Gymnasiums: Harvard, Amherst, Yale. Athletic 
Clubs : Boston Athletic Club, New York Athletic Club. Normal Schools of 
Gymnastics: Boston Normal, Baron Posse, Harvard, Mary Allen Y. W. 
C. A., Dr. Anderson. 

From nowhere else in the country could this valuable experience be 
gained with so little expenditure of time and money. 

The fine building and gymnasium of the local Association afford illus- 
tration of a model work. 

The School's facilities in the way of gymnasium, athletic grounds, 
apparatus, etc., have been described under «• Equipment "(see pages 12-18). 

COURSE IN THEORY. 

Mechanics of the Body. 

Based on Physics and Anatomy. Study of the bones, articulations, 
muscles, muscle insertions, leverage ; of the combined action of muscles 
and mechanism of bodily movements, with special application to gymnas- 
tics and athletics. Demonstration on individuals, of muscular origin, inser- 
tion and action. 




a sphygmographic tracing. 



32 



PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Physiology of Exercise. 

Careful study of both general and special effects of exercise. Relation 
to circulation, respiration, nutrition, secretion ; " wind," breathlessness, 
fatigue, stiffness, overwork, etc., etc. " Training " is considered in this 
connection. Study of the waves in the circulation, as shown by the sphyg- 
mograph, their causes, peculiarities, and value. Original research along 
some special line for the solution of definite problems in our work. 

Ph) 'steal Ex a m in at ion . 

Physical Diagnosis, Loomis. Study of the appearances, conditions, 
defects, and deformities likely to be met with in the examining room; 
method of examining the heart, lungs, etc, to prepare the student to 
assume such responsibilities as may properly rest upon the physical direc- 
tor, and to protect those who may come under his charge against unwise 
exercise and habits of life. 

Massage. 

Handbook of Massage, Kleen. The technique of massage and physio- 
logical effects. General principles as applied to development and training. 
Massage of sprains and strains. Medical massage is not included. 

Gymnastic Therapeutics, 

Underlying principles of the subject rather than the details of applica- 
tion. The treatment of spinal curvature, functional derangements of the 
heart, neurasthenia, general debility, etc. 

A nthropometry. 

Use of anthropomet- 
ric apparatus. Measure- 
ments — how taken, pre- 
served and used. Bodily 
measurements, charts 
and their mathematical 
basis; the "percentile" 
method of Sir Francis 
Galton, the " physical 
height as a unit" method 
of Dr. Hitchcock, the 
ordinary "average" 
method. Typical versus perfect form. Proper use of anthropometric 
charts, fallacies involved in some of them. Characteristics of different 
classes of gymnasts and athletes. 

Photography. 

The camera. Principle of the lens. Chemistry of plate, develop- 
ment, fixing, etc. Instantaneous photography of athletic work. Stereopti- 
con slides. Enlarging. Time pictures of unusual cases in office. Flash 
light photography. Each student will supply his own outfit. 



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PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



33 



Literature of Physical Training. 

Each student will become familiar with the best books and pamphlets 
on physical training during his course. There will be regular class-room 
work in this as in other subjects. 

The students will in connection with this subject use the Physical 
Department of the School's Library. This has been built up largely by the 
contributions of physical directors throughout the country, and is one of 
the largest and best collections in our language on physical education. It 
contains over nine hundred books and pamphlets bearing upon physical 
education. A subject index makes it valuable as an aid to study, not only 
in prescribed work, but in broader lines, as the time of the student may 
permit. 

History and Philosophy of Physical Education. 

With reviews of the following books : Report of Boston Physical 
Training Conference ; Systematic Training of the Body, Schaible ; Phys- 
ical Training in American Colleges, Hartwell ; An Hour with Delsarte, 
Morgan ; Gymnastic Progression, Enebuske ; Kineisiology of Swedish 
Gymnastics, Posse- 

The design of this study is to give the student a clear knowledge of the 
work that has been done along these lines. The fundamental principles 
and aims of each system will be studied. The influence of the athletics of 
the Greeks on national life, the " Pentathlon " ; German gymnastics ; 
life of Jahn, Turnverein, school gymnastics, military gymnastics ; Gym- 
nastics in Sweden, Ling and his work, Royal Gymnastic Institute at Stock- 
holm, Swedish " movement cure"; the renaissance of athletics in France, 
life and work of Delsarte; English athletics; Physical education in 
America ; History of Physical Department of the Young Men's Christian 
Association. 

Reviews and special reading in preparation for graduating essays. 

COURSE IN PRACTICE. 

On account of the fact that this School gives, in its course in practice, 
attention not merely to gymnastics, but aims also to qualify its stu- 
dents as teachers of athletics and aquatics, it is impossible to do much in 
advanced gymnastics. Each class will, however, be carried as far as the 
time will permit. 

Special emphasis is laid all through the course on the enthusiastic 
pushing of that work which will be of chief value to the average man in the 
Associations. Every subject throughout the course is studied and prac- 
ticed from the standpoint of its usefulness as a physical or moral agent in 
the peculiar conditions obtaining in the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tions. Class, rather than individual work, accordingly, is emphasized and 
the elements of recreation and also of moral discipline are striven for. The 
character of the work done in the Associations is rapidly becoming system- 



34 



PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



atized, and a rationale formulated. The aim will be to fit the student for 
the new movement rather than for the old. 

Roberts' Home Dumb-bell Drill, as outlined in " Robert J. Roberts 
and his Work," will receive careful attention, as will also the philosophy of 
his work as outlined in the same pamphlet. 

liar-bell Drill (not yet published), by Dr. Gulick, will be studied at 
the same time. 

The Marching Syslem, by Dr. A. T- Halsted, will be the basis of all 
work in this direction. Special attention will be given to running mazes. 

The Apparatus Work will, during the early part of the course, be such 
as is most useful in Associations where large classes have to be handled 

rapidly. Later on the work more suitable 
for smaller classes, leaders' classes, etc., will 
be studied. There will be given, however, 
only a minimum of work in which hands sup- 
port the weight of the body for more than a 
few moments. Pulley weights will receive 
careful attention, both from the standpoint 
of development and the requirements of 
health gymnastics. 

Traveling rings, flying rings, climbing 
rope, Swedish bom, will each receive the 
attention that their usefulness demands. 

Class work in wrestling and sparring 
will be taken up during the Senior year. Fencing calisthenics will also 
come in at this time. Only that work that is suitable for class work will 
be given. Elementary tumbling, or mat work suitable for classes, will also 
be taught. 

Basket Ball and other games which are valuable as a means of exer- 
cise or recreation are taught and practiced. A Basket Ball League is 
formed and a series of match games played during the winter. 

Each student does actual work in the leading of classes. The art of 
teaching will be discussed on the floor as well as in the class in Pedagogy. 
(See General Course, page 23.) 

Emphasis here as in gymnastics is laid on the health side of the work, 
and on that which is suitable for large numbers. The cultivation of all- 
round rather than special events, is the aim in view. To understand the 
reasons for and the methods of teaching, as well as to qualify the student 
as a performer, are the ends to be attained. 

The Pentathlon will receive chief attention amongst the track and 
field events. 

Lawn tennis courts afford opportunity for this sport. Football has 
received considerable attention during previous years, and the School has 
won an enviable reputation as playing a clean and gentlemanly, as well as 
a hard and fast, game. Games have been played with Harvard, Yale, Wil- 



PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



35 



liams, Amherst, Dartmouth, Trinity, and others. Whether, or not this 
sport will be taken up in the future depends on the future of the game 
amongst the Associations. What this is cannot be seen at present. 

Team Ball, a game designed to take the same place out-of-doors, to 
the bulk of the Association members, that Basket Ball does indoors, will 
be brought out. 

Swimining will receive more attention than formerly. The various 
strokes will be taught and practiced. The rescuing of the drowning, the 
righting of a capsized canoe or boat, diving, etc., will be included in the 
course. 

The elements of rowing, paddling, and sailing will be taught ; this 
work being done on the Connecticut river. 

Several times during the course the students form a camp over night, 
generally going by boat. After Commencement there is usually a party 
that sails down the Connecticut river to the Sound, and on it for a short 
time. 

» The physical department students are required to unite and work with 
the Springfield Young Men's Christian Association throughout the entire 
course, to do regular service on one of the Association's standing commit- 
tees, and to attend all stated meetings of the committee to which ap- 
pointed. 

They will also be expected during the course to visit the large gym- 
nasiums of either Boston or New York, and that of either Harvard, Yale, 
or Amherst; also to attend each year two conventions, one of the Young 
Men's Christian Association and the other of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Physical Education. 

THE COURSE BY YEARS. 

First Year. 

Bible, see p. 20 ; Physiology, see p. 22 ; Hygiene, see p. 22 ; English 
Composition, etc., see p. 24; Physics, see p. 21 ; Chemistry, see p. 21 ; 
Vocal Music, see p. 24; Practical Work, see pp. 33-35. 

Second Year. 

Bible, see p. 20 ; Nerve Physics, see p. 22 ; Physiological Psychology, 
see p. 22; Psychology, see p. 22; Department Theory, see pp. 31-33; 
Methods and Principles of the Young Men's Christian Association, see 
pp. 23-24; Department Work, see pp. 33-35 ; Practical Work, see p. 35. 

Third Year. 

Bible, see p. 20 ; Ethics, see p. 22 ; Sociology, see p. 22 ; Pedagogy, 
see p. 23 ; Department Theory, see pp. 31-33; Department Practice, see 
PP- 33-35- 



For admission and expenses, see page 40, 41. 



EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT. 



Object: — The Training of Men for the Supervision of the Educa- 
tional Work of the Association. 

First, Educational Directors for the special duties of direct supervision 
of the educational departments of Association work. 

Second, Training Secretaries to have a more comprehensive idea of, 
that they may have a more intelligent general supervision over, the educa- 
tional department of their work. 

LOCATION. 

Within easy reach of a score or more institutions of learning of the 
highest order, also in close proximity to a large number of Associations 
where educational work is carried on, the location for such a school and 
such a training is most desirable. In many instances the students will be 
able to secure practical experience as well as material assistance by teach- 
ing night classes in neighboring Associations. 

THE NEED OF TO-DAY. 

Practical and specially trained educators capable of reaching and in- 
fluencing men on all sides of their lives to serve in the capacity of Educa- 
tional Directors of the Young Men's Christian Association. 

To young men of ability trained for this work is offered an unusual 
opportunity for usefulness by enabling them to become potent factors in 
solving many of the problems of to-day by reaching and helping young 
men in all that makes for honest Christian manhood and good citizenship. 

The possibilities of the educational work of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Associations, and the need for intelligent direction and supervision, 
are meeting with more and more recognition. Great masses of bright and 
capable young men in all parts of our country are willing and ready to improve 
every opportunity to better their condition. The educational facilities 
within their reach are as yet inadequate. Already large numbers are tak- 
ing advantage of the facilities offered by the Association educational 
classes, and are receiving material benefit as well as mental stimulus. 
These numbers might and should be multiplied many fold. 

The diversity of subjects taught in the evening classes of the Young 
Men's Christian Association will give a good idea of the immense possi- 
bilities in the educational work for reaching men of all classes and condi- 
tions, and will give a fair idea of its importance and adaptability. We 

36 



EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT. 



37 



must remember that no one Association takes up any considerable portion 
of them except perhaps a few in the largest cities. We expect that all 
graduates of this department will have at least an intelligent appreciation 
of the subjects outlined, and the conditions under which they are success- 
fully carried on so far as they relate to the planning of courses and reach- 
ing various classes of men, and will have a class-room training in all of the 
more important ones. 

A training of such breadth should qualify a man so to direct the edu- 
cational work of any Association that it will fully meet the needs of the 
various classes of men found in the city, and useless experiments costing 
time and money be avoided. This makes self evident the answer to the 
question, " Why such a training ? " 

The Department course includes the following : — 

1. Reading Room. 

2. Library. 

3. Literary societies. 

4. Lectures and Practical Talks. 

5. Educational Class Work Classified as follows : Commercial ; Po- 
litical ; Scientific; Industrial; Language; Miscellaneous. 

Reading Room, especially in its relation to Educational Class Work. 

Equipment — Location of room. Selecting and securing of those 
papers and periodicals that will be the most useful for the class of men it 
is desired to reach. 

Supervision — Care of rooms, books, and periodicals. Classification 
and cataloguing. Methods of directing readers to the material most useful. 

Library^ especially in its relation to Educational Class Work. 

Technical, reference, and circulating departments. Classification and 
cataloguing. Records. Librarian. Arrangement. Selection in buying 
books, ways and means, judicial advertising. 

Literary Societies. 

Congress, City Council, Technical Society, Working Men's Club. 

Lectures. 

Practical Talks, their use and abuse. The use of home talent. 

Educational Classes. 

In order that the best possible understanding of the opportunities for 
usefulness and the relative importance of this department may be had, we 
give here as complete a list as possible of the subjects already taught in 
the Associations on this continent. 

( 'omtnercial. 

1. Commercial arithmetic. 2. Penmanship. 3. Bookkeeping. 4. 
Business correspondence. 5. Business law. 6. Banking. 7. Shorthand. 
8. Typewriting. 



38 



EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT. 



Political. 

I. Geography. 2. History. 3. Civil government. 4. Social science. 
5. Ethics. 6. Political economy. 7. City council. 8. Congress. 

Scientific. 

1. Arithmetic. 2. Algebra. 3. Geometry. 4. Trigonometry. 5. 
Physics. 6. Chemistry. 7. Physical laboratory. 8. Chemical laboratory. 
9. Electricity. 10. Electrical engineering. 11. Steam engineering. 12. 
Mechanics. 13. Mechanical engineering. 14. Civil engineering. 15. 
Architectural engineering. 

Industrial. 

1. Mechanical drawing. 2. Architectural drawing. 3. Free hand 
drawing. 4. Monumental drawing. 5. Carriage designing. 6. Original 
designing. 7. Blueprinting. 8. Clay modeling. 9. Plaster casting. 10. 
Wood carving. 11. Carpentry. 12. Pattern making. 13. Forging. 14. 
Tempering. 15. Chipping. 16. Filing. 17. Molding. 18. Casting. 19* 
Plumbing. 20. Brazing. 

Lajigiiage. 

1. Reading and spelling. 2. Grammar. 3. Composition. 4. Rhetoric. 
5. English. 6. English literature. 7. Public speaking. 8. Elocution. 9. 
French. 10. German. 11. Spanish. 12. Latin. 13. Greek. 

Miscellaneous. 

r. Vocal music. 2. Glee club. 3. Orchestral music. 4. Bible school. 
5. Mechanical club. 6. Psychology and hygiene. 7. Foods, diet, etc. 8. 
Sanitation. 9. First aid. 10. Telegraphy. 11. Photography. 12. Venti- 
lation. 13. Tours. 

Total in all departments, seventy-seven. 

EXPLANATORY. 

The Associations have found it necessary in their evening classes to 
teach almost all the subjects in a different manner from the way they are 
taught in ordinary school work, owing to the fact that they reach men 
already engaged in practical life, and the object is to give them only that 
part of the subject adapted to their needs, and thus enable them with the 
least expenditure of time to get the greatest amount of benefit. 

The School's course in Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry is 
planned with a view not only to give the student a knowledge of the under- 
lying principles of the subject, but also with special reference in its applica- 
tion to practical, everyday problems, thus making it possible for them to 
plan courses best adapted to the needs of young men. 

In the course in Physics, enough attention is given to matter and its 
properties for practical use. The student is passed as rapidly as possible 
on to such subjects as dynamics in its relation to laws of motion, work, and 
energy, transformation of energy, machines, etc. ; heat in its relation to such 



EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT. 



V) 



problems in practical life as combustion of fuels, transmission of heat in 
heating and ventilating buildings ; heat in its relation to the various prob- 
lems of everyday comfort and practical life, power, etc. ; sound in its rela- 
tion to transmission of waves ; the relation between light and heat, leading 
up to and giving special emphasis to the important and far-reaching problems 
of to day, electricity and magnetism. 

The course in Chemistry covers the history of Alchemy of the Middle 
Ages in order that the student may recognize the important part played by 
this science in the development of the civilization of to-day ; the common 
elements, their occurrence, uses, and relation to each other, and to our every- 
day existence. Especial attention is given to a few of the more important 
elements, such as oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen, and their combinations 
which have a part in supporting life, such as air and water. The properties 
and impurities of these will be taken' up so that the student will be enabled 
intelligently to test for them and to teach and apply the principles of 
sanitation. The metals are studied with special reference to those used in 
the trades and industries, their composition, classification, and relative 
importance. Such chemical combinations as relate to bleaching, dyeing, 
foods, poisons, etc., are studied. 

DEPARTMENT PRACTICE. 

In this is included the laboratory work in practical physics and chemis- 
try, together with the shop work in wood and iron. In the Physical Labora- 
tory the students become familiar with the manipulation of laboratory 
apparatus. In the Chemical Laboratory is included the work of testing 
for elements and commercial compounds, etc. In the Mechanical Labora- 
tory is studied the properties of wood and iron, the various tools and their 
use, parts of structure, machines, etc., complete designs with a view to 
proportion, design, and symmetry. 

THE COURSE BY YEARS. 

First Year. 

Bible, Physiology, Hygiene, the English Language, Physics, Chemistry, 
Vocal Music, Department Laboratory Practice. 

Second Year. 

Bible, Nerve Physics, Physiological Psychology, Psychology, Depart- 
ment Theory, Methods and Principles of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, Practice in Educational Department of Association Work, Labora- 
tory Practice, Gymnasium Practice. 

Third 1 'ear. 

Bible, Ethics, Sociology, Pedagogy, Department Theory, First Aid, 
Swimming, Boating, etc., Department Practice. 

For equipment see pages 17, 18. For admission and expenses see 
pages 40, 41. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 



The School is open only to Christian young men, over eighteen years 
of age, who have already shown ability in the direction of the work for 
which they wish to prepare. Each applicant must be a member in good 
standing of an evangelical church, and if admitted shall bring a certificate 
to this effect and unite and work with some church of his choice in this 
city. 

Each applicant for admission shall give evidence of having had at 
least a fair English education. If a graduate of a college or high school, 
he shall, upon entering, show his certificate of graduation ; if not, he must, 
before he can be accepted, pass a preliminary examination. Applicants for 
the Physical Department will also have a physical examination. Business 
experience is very desirable. 

Several weeks are sometimes required in making a thorough investiga- 
tion, hence the desirability of making application as early as possible. 
Only after satisfactory reports are received can any student be admitted to 
the School. The School year begins with the second Wednesday in Sep- 
tember. Students who enter for one year, or the course, will not be ad- 
mitted after the last of September. In extreme cases men will be admitted 
for a part of a year, but nothing aside from the regular work is promised to 
such. 

It will be greatly to the advantage of all to enter at the beginning of 
the year, and too much emphasis cannot be laid upon the importance of 
taking the entire course. 

Each student shall give at least one week's notice if for any reason he 
wishes to leave the School before the end of the year. 

Each is received upon probation ; and when it becomes clearly evident 
that the prerequisites for success are wanting, he will no longer be retained 
in the School. 

Each student who has not already done so, is urged to read carefully, 
in advance of his coming, " The Student's Manual,'' by Rev. John Todd. 

ROOMS. 

Each student lodging in the dormitory will care for his own room, 
which must be kept scrupulously clean. He will be expected to provide 
sheets, pillow and bolster slips, towels, and soap. Beds are all single, three 
feet in width ; pillows, 18x26 inches. Rooms are liable to inspection. 

Sets consisting of four sheets, two pillow slips, four large linen towels, 
and two large bath towels, all hemmed, can be furnished by the School 
for $4.00, if ordered in advance. 

40 



ESTIMATE OF EXPENSES. 



FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR OF FORTY WEEKS. 

The following table is based upon the experience of the past five 
years : — 

Secretarial and Educational Physical 





Depai 


tments. 


Department. 


Table board (with students' club), 


$100 to $125 


$100 to $125 


Furnished room with light and heat, 


60 


" . 60 


60 ' 


« 60 


Tuition, 


50 


" 5° 




' 50 


Gymnasium suits,* 


8 


" 12 


is ' 


' 4ot 


Washing, 


1 2 


" 20 


12 1 


' 20 


Text and note books 


12 


" 20 


20 ' 


' 35 


Conventions, 


l S 


18 


15 ' 


18 


Membership in local Association, 




" 10 


2 ' 


' 10 




$259 


" $3>5 


$274 « 





The above estimate covers only the items specified, and 
not other necessary incidentals, which each must calculate 
for himself. 



Only sixty-four students can be lodged in the new dormitory, and 
rooms are assigned as the students are accepted; rooms so assigned, un- 
less by special engagement, will not be held more than one day after the 
opening of the term. 

Tuition is payable promptly on the last Monday in September and 
January, one half at each payment. Room rent, on last Monday in each 
month. No reduction of rent will be made to a student who engages a 
room and fails to appear at the specified time, nor to one who vacates his 
room less than a month before the close of the school. Rent stops only 
when the room is vacated and the key delivered to the janitor. A deposit 
of fifty cents will be required for each key. 

Students will save themselves trouble and expense by bringing ex- 
change on New York and Boston banks rather than local checks. 



* Students are advised not to purchase gymnasium or athletic suits before coming to the School as 
the School has regulation colors and suits which all are expected to wear. 

\Gymnasi11m —Long-sleeved jersey, $3.00; pants, #3.00; belt, 50 cents ; shoes, $2.50. Field.— 
Football suit (including shoes), $8.00 ; sleeveless jersey, $2.50 ; sweater, $3.50 ; spiked shoes, #4.50 ; 
tennis shoes, $2. 50 ; running pants, 75 cents; hat, 50 cents. Many of these need to be purchased 
but once. 

t To this should be added, in the Senior year, from $30 upwards for photography and sphyg- 
mography. 

41 



RECITATIONS, PRACTICE, AND EXAMINATIONS. 

Each student is expected to have at least three fifty minute class-room 
exercises each day during five days of the week, also at least two hours 
daily practice, according to the year and department, in gymnastics, ath- 
letics, shop work, laboratory work, or practical work in the Young Men's 
Christian Association. 

Examinations, either oral or written, are made at the option of each 
instructor. 

Monday is the School holiday. 

A Junior or Middler shall be eligible for promotion only after passing 
satisfactorily in every branch prescribed for the year covered, and upon 
recommendation of the department superintendent. 

A Senior shall be' eligible for graduation only after passing satisfac- 
torily in every branch of the course, and upon recommendation of the de- 
partment superintendent. 

FELLOWSHIPS. 

There have been established Fellowships which will yield three hun- 
dred dollars per year. 

They will be awarded by the faculty, the following points being those 
chiefly to be considered : — 

i st, Character ; 2d, Scholarship; 3d, Proficiency in practical depart- 
ment work. 

The Fellowships are open to any, but, other things being equal, they 
will be given to graduates of the School. They will be awarded if possible 
on or before Commencement day of each year. 

The duties connected with a Fellowship are : — 

1st. The acting as assistant in department theory and practice, the 
work not to exceed four hours a day. 

2d. The preparation of a thesis which shall embody the results of 
original work done under the supervision and with the advice of the super- 
intendent of the department. 

FOR GENERAL INFORMATION 
Concerning the School apply to Oliver C. Morse, Cor. Secretary. 

FOR SPECIAL INFORMATION 

Concerning the departments or for admission to the School, address : — 
J. T. Bowne, Supt. Secretarial Department. 
Luther Gulick, M.D., Supt. Physical Department. 
D. F. Graham, Supt. Educational Department. 

42 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 



Inquiries concerning the finances will receive immediate attention if 
addressed to Oliver C. Morse, Corresponding Secretary, and remittances 
may be made payable to his order or to George D. Chamberlain, Treas- 
urer. 

FORM OF BEQUEST. 

I give and bequeath to the International Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation Training School, Springfield, Mass., the sum of 

dollars * 

BEQUEST FOR ENDOWMENT. 
I give and bequeath to the International Young Men's Christian Asso 

ciation Training School, Springfield, Mass., the sum of 

to be safely invested by them and called the 

Fund. The interest of this fund to be applied to the use of the School.* 

PERPETUAL LOAN FUND. 

For the purpose of founding a perpetual loan fund in the International 
Young Men's Christian Association Training School, Springfield, Mass. 
(or any of its departments, if so stated), I hereby give the sum of five 
thousand dollars — or its equivalent in good securities at cash value — to be 
safely invested by them, the income' to be loaned toward the education of 
students who have already shown ability in the School. 



*Or the testator may specif}', towards the current expenses ; or towards the support of a chair of 
instruction in the General Course, or in any of the departments ; or to be used as a loan towards the 
education of students who have shown ability in any of the departments. 



43 



STUDENTS NOW ENGAGED IN ASSOCIATION 

WORK. 



The following is an approximately correct list of the students now in 
the work that have been under regular instruction in the International 
Young Men's Christian Association Training School, at Springfield, Mass., 
up to and including the Class of '95. 

State Secretary, Topeka, Kan. 
Phys. Director, Hartford, Ct. 
Ass't Instructor Int. Y. M. C. A. Train- 
ing School, Springfield, Mass. 
General Secretary, Taunton, Mass. 
General Secretary, St. Stephen, N. B. 
General Secretary, Brattleboro, Vt. 
General Secretary. 



Aiken, Eugene Myron, '83, 

Allen, Lewis Warren, '88; 

Allen, Winfred Emery, '95, 

Andrew, William Alexander, '91, 

Archibald, Lyman Walker, '93, 

Austin, Burton Cyrus, '94, 

Austin, Lewis Seybolt, '95, 

Badger, Jonathan Edmund, '94, 

Baker, George Douglas, '90, 

Baldwin, Harry Anderson, '91, 

Ball, William Henry, '91, 

Ballard, Lyman Ellsworth, 94, 

Barnes, Frank Everts. '93, 

Barrett, Stephen Edwin, '90, 

Bartlett, Reuel Earnest, '95, 

Barton, William Henry, '91, 

Bell, Arthur Ferguson, '94, 

Black, Jotham Frethey, '94, 

Black, Walter Orlando, '92, 

Bond, Thomas Parsons, '93, 

Boucher, Clarence Root, '87, 

Brown, Arthur White, 94, 

Bunting, Albert Edward, '94, 
burkhardt, frederick william, '93, 

Canfield, James Edward, '89, 

Carey, Charles Henry, '94, 

Carey, Wilbert Franklin, '92, 
Carruthers, Frederick Fayette, '89, 

Carson, Albert Thompson, '90, 

Chapman, Daniel C, '87, 

Chapman, William Francis, '87, 

Chase, William Richmond, '93, 

Cobleigh, Irving Vasa, '95, 

Colton, Oscar Clement, '88, 

Cook, John Wesley, '88, 



Thys. Director, Toronto, Ont. 
General Secretary, Muscatine, Io. 
General Secretary, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Phys. Director, Montreal, Que. 
Phys Director, 23d St. Br., N. Y.City. 
Phys. Director, Woburn, Mass. 
Ass't Sec'y, R. R. Br., N. Y. City. 
Phys. Director. 

Phys. Director, So. Framingham, Mass. 
General Secretary, Halifax, N. S. 
Phys. Director, Williamsport, Pa. 
Phys. Director, Redlands, Cal. 
Phys. Director, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Gen'I Sec'y, R. R. Br., Covington, Ky. 
Phys. Director, 

General Sec'y, Wateiford, N. Y. 
Phys. Director Ger. Br., St. Louis, Mo. 

General Sec'y, Gt. Barrington, Mass. 
Phys. Director, Dallas, Texas. 
General Secretary, So. Bend, Ind. 
General Secretary, Hastings, Neb. 
General Secretary, Platt&burg, N. Y. 
General Secretary, Ventura, Cal. 
Ass't Secretary, Montreal, Qi.e. 
General Secretary, Whitman, Mass. 
General Secretary, Norwich, Ct. 
General Secretary, Quincy, Mass. 
General Secretary, Bridgeport, Ct. 



45 



46 



STUDENTS IN ASSOCIATION WORK. 



Corbett, David Watson, '91, 

Cotton, Arthur Norman, '95, 

Crowe, Robert Oscar, '95, 

Daum, William Fletcher, '90, 

Davev, Joseph John, '94, 

Davis, William Henry, '92, 

Day, George Edward, '93, 
Denman, Wm. Van Benschoten, '95, 

Dickson, Henry David, '90, 

Dietz, Henry Louis, '94, 

Driver, James Kemp, '92, 

Dudley, Joseph Matthews, '95, 

Durand, William Balch, '95, 

Edwards, James Henry, '90, 

Exner, Max Joseph, '92, 

Fagg, Frederick Dowe, '88, 

Fairbanks, William Austin, '94, 

Fenner, Romaine Cordillo, '89, 

flllebrown, herbert martin, '90, 

Finch, George Hardy, '92, 

Fleming, Everett Thomas, '90, 

Fleming, George, '91, 

Flindt, Albert Edward, '90, 

Foss, Peter Lenord, '92, 

Francis, Ebenezer, '92, 

Freer, Harvey Washington, '95, 

French, Benjamin Snell, '93, 

Gabler, George Lewis, '94, 

Garland, Albert Ellsworth, '91, 

Gillett, Burt Wood, '87, 

Godtfring, Frederic William, '90, 

Greene, Sylvester Charles, '88, 

Halsted, Alfred Thompson, '91, 

Haskell, Claire Ellis, '93, 

Holman, Frank, '94, 

Horlacher, Louis Abraham, '90, 

Horner, Rudolf, '94, 

Ishikawa, Gen Samuro, '92, 

Jackson, Joseph Proctor, '89, 

Jones, Alfred Kirk, 90, 



General Secretary, Honolulu, Hawaii. 
Ass't Secretary, Rochester, N. Y. 
General Secretary, Peterboro, Out. 

Ass't Secretary, Springfield, Mass. 
General Secretary, Rockland, Mass. 
Ass't Secretary, Bridgeport, Conn. 
General Secretary, Lynn, Mass. 
Phys. Director, Reading, Pa. 
General Secretary, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Phys. Director, 20th St. Br., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 
Phys. Director, Dubuque, Io. 
General Secretary, Handley, W. Va. 
Phys. Director, Buffalo, N. Y. 

General Secretary, Reading, Pa. 
Phys. Dir., Carleton College, North- 
field, Minn. 
Gen. Sec, 26th Ward Br., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
General Secretary, Concord, N. H. 
General Secretary, Peioskey, Mich. 
Ass't State Sec'y, Mass. and R. L, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 
General Secretary, Torrington, Ct. 
General Secretary, Passaic, N. J. 
General Secretary, Brandon, Manitoba. 
General Secretary, Bay City, Mich. 
Phys. Director, Indianapolis, Ind. 
General Secretary, Sing Sing, N. Y. 
General Secretary. 
General Secretary, Stoneham, Mass. 

Phys. Director, Bridgeport, Ct. 
Phys. Director, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
General Secretary, Manchester, N. H. 
Financial Sec, Ger. Br., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Genera] Secretary, Union Depot Br., St. 

Louis, Mo. 
Phys. Director, Springfield, Mass. 
Phys. Director, San Antonio, Texas. 
General Secretary, Kingston, Ont. 
Gen. Secretary, Ger. Br., Chicago, 111. 
Gen. Sec, Ger. Br., San Francisco, Cal. 

Gen. Sec, Japanese Ass'n, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 
General Secretary, Dallas, Texas. 
Phys. Director, Utica, N. Y. 



STUDENTS IN ASSOCIATION WORK. 



47 



Killam, Frank, 
King, Elisha Alonzo, 
Kingsbury, Charles Henry, 
Kinnicutt, William Henry, 

Lantz, Christian, 
Locher, William Walter, 
Lohans, Herman Henry, 
Loring, Benjamin Tappan, 
Lotze, William George, 
Lunbeck, Arthur William, 
Lutz, John William, 

McCastline, Robert, 
McCleery, William James, 
McCurdy, James Huff, 

MacDonald, Finlay Grant, 
McGown, Chester Stowe, 
Mackay, Angus Murdoch, 
McKee, William Charles, 

McLeod, Alexander W., 
MacPhie, Duncan Angus, 
Mahan, Frank, 
Marshall, Fraser G., 

Martin, Charles Alvin, 
Martin, Rufus Jonathan, 
Maylott, Worthy Francis, 
Medd, Henry, 
Merrill, Frank Herbert, 
Meyer, Fred Winfred, 
Mogge, Ernest Lewis, 
Morgan, William George, 
Moyer, Elkanah DeWilla, 
Murray, Murdoch Kenzie, 

Naismith, James, 
Norris, James Hervey, 

Oller, Lawrence Shannon, 
Owen, William Thomas, 

Page, John, 

Page, Pierson Sterling, 
Parker, Anson Lindsley, 
Patton, Thos. Duncan, 
Pell, Frank William, 
Pogue, Elliott Samuel, 



'95, Phys. Director. 

'94, General Secretary, Newport, Ky. 

'92, General Secretary, Cumberland, Mcl. 

'94, Phys. Director, Cleveland, Ohio. 

'94, Gen. Sec, Greenpoint, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

'90, General Secretary, Muskegon, Mich. 

'95, Gen. Sec , German Br., Buffalo, N. Y. 

'93, Phys. Director, Lynn, Mass. 

'88, General Secretary, Denver, Col. 

'91, General Secretary, Uniontown, Pa. 

'94, Phys. Director, Knoxville, Tenn. 

'93, Ass't Phys. Dir., Harlem Br., N.Y. City. 

'94, General Secretary, Yarmouth, N. S. 

'91, Instructor Y. M. C. A. Training School, 

Springfield, Mass. 

'93, General Secretary, Reading, Mass. 

'95, General Secretary, Thompsonville, Ct. 

'89, General Secretary, Hamilton, Ont. 

'91, General Secretary, South Side Branch, 

Pittsburg, Pa. 

'87, General Secretary, Vancouver, B. C. 

'89, Phys. Director, Plainfield, N. J. 

'93, General Secretary, Charlotte, N. C. 

'90, Prov'l Secretary Maritime Provinces, 

Truro, N. S. 

'95, General Secretary, Milton, Pa. 

'94, Phys. Director, Northampton, Mass. 

'95, General Secretary, Millbury, Mass. 

'91, General Secretary, Summit, N. J. 

'95, General Secretary. 

'90, General Secretary, Springfield, Mass. 

'95, General Secretary, Geneva, N. Y. 

'94, Phys. Director, Auburn, Me. 

'95, General Secretary, Steelton, Pa. 

'90, General Secretary, Bath, Me. 

'92, Phys. Director, Denver, Col. 

'89, General Secretary, Hudson, Mass. 

'95, Phys. Director, Pittsburg, Pa. 

'90, Phys. Director, New Bedford, Mass. 

'95, General Secretary, Gait, Ont. 

'94, Phys. Director, Orange, N. J. 

'90, General Secretary, Detroit, Mich. 

'92, General Secretary, Winnipeg, Man. 

'9 r , General Secretary, Palestine, Texas. 

'96, Gen. Sec, Col'd Br., Washington, D. C. 



48 



STUDENTS IN ASSOCIATION WORK. 



Pollard, David Wright, 
Powlison, Charles Ford, 

Pratt, Frank Magee, 
Rideout, Melvin Bragdon, 
Ridgeway, John William, 
Ritchie, Mark, 
Rogers, D wight Leete, 

ROCERS, JoSIAH WlNSLOW, Jr., 

Ross, Maurice, 

Ruggles, Edward Packenham, 
Russell, Walter Burton, 

Sayford, Raphael, 
Seerley, Frank Newell, 

Shutts, George Liberty, 
Sibley, Frank Leroy, 
Smith, Fred. W., 
Smith, Harvey Leigh, 
Smith, John Peter, 
Spence, Donald McKay, 
Sprague, Douglas, 
Stephens, Duncan Calder, 
Stockwell, Albert Pike, 
Stratton, Arthur Talmage, 
Symonds, William H., 

Theis, Paul Eugene, 
Thompson, Hugh Currie, 
Thompson, John Georc.e, 

Vinson, James, 

Von Starck, Waldemar, 

Von Zastrow, Benno George, 

Welzmiller, Louis, Jr., 

Winslow, George Henry, 
Worth, Elbridge Morseman, 
Wyman, Wm. Hutchinson, 



'94, Phys. Director, Pawtucket, R. I. 

'89, Instructor Int. Y. M. C. A. Training 

School, Springfield, Mass. 

'87, General Secretary, Toronto, Ont. 

'93, Phys. Director, Paris, France. 

'96, General Secretary. 

'94, General Secretary, Calgary, Alberta. 

'94, General Secretary, Northampton, Mass 

'95, General Secretary, Greenfield, Mass. 

'94, Phys. Director, Fitchburg, Mass. 

'95, Phys. Director. 

'95, Phys. Director, Pottsville, Pa. 

'93, General Secretary, Marlboro, Mass. 

'90, Instructor Int. Y. M. C. A. Training 

School, Springfield, Mass. 

'92, Gen. Secretary, Framingbam, Mass. 

'94, Gen. Secretary, Chicopee, Mass. 

'94, Phys. Director, Bangor, Me. 

'93, Phys. Director, Galveston, Texas. 

'91, General Secretary, Clinton, Iowa. 

'92, General Secretary, Montpelier, Vt. 

'90, General Secretary, Charleston, W.Va. 

'94, General Secretary, Belleville, Ont. 

'92, General Secretary, Calcutta, India. 

'88, General Secretary, Pawtucket, R. I. 

'87, General Secretary, Somerville, Mass. 

'91, General Secretary, Paris, France. 

'89, General Secretary, New Haven, Conn. 

'93, General Secretary, New Glasgow, N. S. 

'92, General Secretary, Birmingham, Ala. 

'90, General Secretary, Breslau, Germany. 

'91, Gen. Sec, German Branch, Baltimore, 
Md. 

'94, Phys. Director, East 86th Street Branch, 

New York City. 

'9r, Railroad Secretary, Clifton Forge, Va. 

'94, General Secretary, Lock Haven, Pa. 

'89, General Secretary, Gloucester, Mass. 



IV fl OTHIhO ^ e P°^ c ' es as liberal cost as little money, no others as 
HvF "1 lll^lv c heap give as much for the money, as those of 

The Travelers 



OF HARTFORD, CO XIV. 

Non-forfeitable, world-wide, lowest cash rate. Also, largest Accident 
Company in the World, larger than all others in America 
together. Covers Accidents of 

Travel, Sport, or Business, 

All Around the Globe. 

Assets, - $17,664,000.00 

Surplus, - 2,472,000.00 
Paid Policy-holders, - 28,000,000.00 

$2,151,000.00 OF IT IN 1894. 



Jas. G. Batterson, Pres't. Rodney Dennis, Sec'y. John E. Morris, Ass't Sec'y. 
1 1 . M. PHILLIPS, President. <;. F. ADAMS. Treasurer. 

The Phillips Manufacturing Co. 

Contractors for 

Steam anb Ibot Mater 
Ibeating Apparatus 

AND SANITARY PLUMBING. 



Dealers in 



Steam and Gas Fitters* and Plumbers' Materials. 



Nos. 35 and 37 

LYMAN STREET, 



Springfield, Hass. 



ESTABLISHED 1836. 



PUTNAM MACHINE CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Standard Metal Working Machine Tools, 



Automatic Steam Engines, Etc., Etc. 




14-Inch Swing Engine Lathe. Actual Swing 15 Inches. 

DESIGNERS AND BUILDERS OF 

MACHINE SHOP EQUIPMENTS, 

Including Standard Engine Lathes, Planers, Shapers, 
Radial and Upright Drills, Milling Machines, 
Screw Machines, Bolt Cutters, and 
Special Bicycle Machinery. 

PUTNAM MACHINE CO.'S WORKS. FOURTEEN ACRES. 

For price and information address direct to 

PUTNAM MACHINE CO., 

FITCH BU RC, MASS., U. S. A. 



jREPORT OF THE TRUSTEES TO THE 
CORPORATION 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL 
YOUNG'MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
TRAINING SCHOOL. 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 19, 1895. 



CONTENTS. 

PAGE. 

Introductory, 50 

Widening Influence ok School, - 50 

Alumni. - - - - - 51 

Outside Work of Instructors, - 51 

This Year's Students, - - 51 

Course of Instruction, - - 51 

Special Lecturks, 53 

Practical Work, 53 

Libraries, - - - - - 53 

Extension of Course to Three Years, 54 

Change of Weekly Holiday, c;4 
Departments : 

Secretarial, 54 

Physical, 54 

Educational, - - - 54 
Property Interests : 

Land, - - - - 55 

Gymnasium Building, - - 56 

Dormitory Building, - - 56 

Current Expenses, 56 

Treasurer's Report, 5S 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



TO THE CORPORATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL 
V. M. C. A. TRAINING SCHOOL. 

For the Year ending June 19, 1895. 

Gentlemen : — The year which closes to-day has been rendered notable to the 
School by the meeting of the Thirty-first International Convention of the Young 
Men's Christian Associations of North America in this city. 

For twenty-three years New England had not been favored by such a conven- 
tion. At the last one, held in Lowell, Mass., in 1872, a prophecy was made that 
ere long a training school would be needed to prepare men for the office of general 
secretary in our Young Men's Christian Associations. 

Thirteen years later, or ten years ago, this School was founded, and this year 
the city in which it is located has had the privilege of welcoming the International 
Convention, and giving to its delegates a good opportunity of seeing the fulfillment 
of the prophecy uttered twenty-three years ago at Lowell. 

This convention brought together many of the prominent and deeply interested 
friends of Association work from.far and near, and afforded them a good opportunity 
of inspecting the location, surroundings, and appliances of this Association " School 
of the prophets," besides giving to the students in training at the School, a most 
practical and in every way excellent and inspiring outlook over the whole field of 
Association activity, and of bringing them into contact with many of its recognized 
leaders. 

Widening hifiuence of the School's Work : — 

The growth, not only in the actual number of the School's graduates, that are 
now in the service of the Associations, but in their proportion to other secretaries 
and physical directors, is noteworthy. 

The proportion of secretaries trained at the School has, within less than two 
years, increased from one in ten, to more than one in nine, while the number of 
secretaries and physical directors in the United States and Canada, taken together, 
is twenty per cent, of the total number, or one in five. 

In localities where the School has received special encouragement, however, 
its helpful influence has naturally been much greater than elsewhere. In Massa- 
chusetts and Rhode Island, for example, according to the last report of their state 
committee, thirty-six out of the one hundred and four general secretaries and phys- 
ical directors employed in these two states were trained at this School. In the 
Dominion of Canada over forty-two per cent, have obtained their special prepara- 
tion for the work at this institution. 

5° 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



The reports during the past year, also, concerning the valuable contributions 
which the students of the Physical Department are making to the organization and 
development along right lines of the physical work of the Associations, and, above 
all, the reports of increased spiritual fruitfulness on the part of recent graduates, 
are an occasion for thanksgiving. 

The School's influence, however, is not limited to this country, but is being 
exerted as a shaping and molding force, through its graduates, on all continents 
and in six different nations besides the United States and Canada. 

Moreover, the superintendent of the Secretarial Department received a letter 
last January from the secretary of the Association in Berlin, Germany, announcing 
his intention to start a course of training, similar to that furnished by our School, to 
prepare men for the work in Germany, and neighboring countries. 

The Aluytni'. — 

The love and loyalty of the School's alumni for their Alma Mater is very 
gratifying. The School was glad to welcome back to Springfield about fifty of them 
at the time of the International Convention, and many of them in various ways have 
aided both in the support of the School and the extension of its property interests. 

It is hoped, also, that the School's Alumni Association will develop increased 
efficiency, as an organization established for the promotion of the School's interests. 

During the Christmas holidays, a Metropolitan Chapter of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation was organized, the membership of which will consist of alumni located in 
New York or within a radius of fifty miles of that city. A Connecticut Valley 
Chapter has also been suggested. Such chapters might serve to concentrate and 
foster interest in the School's work, and promote plans helpful to it. 

The graduates of this year are to publish in their class book as full a list as 
possible of all the men who have ever attended the Springfield School from three 
months to two years. This will constitute the first published list that approaches 
completion. 

Outside 'Work of Instructors : — 

Aside from their regular duties at the School, different members of the faculty 
have made themselves useful to quite a large number of the Associations, by lec- 
tures, and by addresses on anniversary or other occasions. 

This Year 's Students : — 

The students this year have numbered forty-nine, twenty-four of whom belong 
to the Secretarial Department, and twenty-five to the Physical. Their attendance 
has covered more nearly the entire course than during any previous year. 

Of the forty-nine students twenty-one have been members of the Senior class, 
while twenty-eight have been members of the Junior class. Of this latter class five 
are college graduates, a larger number than in any previous class. Twenty-five 
per cent, are from Canada, the largest delegation we have ever had from across 
the line. 

The first colored man has entered the School this year for the regular course 
of training, and an Italian student who is preparing for the secretaryship of the 
Association in Rome, Italy. Germany and Ireland are also represented. 

( 'ourse of Instruction : — 

A new departure was made at the opening of the School year. The first two 
and a half days were devoted to a series of lectures to all the students, by differ- 



52 REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 

ent members of the faculty, on subjects having a general bearing upon the work 
of the year, such as, the students' relation to outside work; how best to economize 
their time ; to train the memory ; to make best use of the libraries ; to make 
abstracts and take notes of the lectures; to classify the material for work. One 
of the students afterwards remarked that it would have been a boon to him had 
he received such suggestions at the beginning of his college course. 

Changes in the courses of instruction led to the retirement of Dr. A. T. Hal- 
sted from the School's service last January, though we are glad to report that 
his valuable services will not be entirely lost to the students of the School, as he 
has accepted the position of Physical Director of the Springfield Association. 

The Bible instruction given by Mr. James McConaughy, the teacher of the 
English Bible at Mount Hermon, to each of the classes during the first and last 
ten weeks of the School year, has proved most valuable and acceptable, and it has 
been a matter of great regret, therefore, that Mr. McConaughy feels unable to 
continue the work another year, his regular work at Mount Hermon being too 
much of a tax and strain upon him to allow of his again undertaking this addi- 
tional work. We are glad, however, to state that we are able to secure his serv- 
ices for a few illustrated lectures to the students upon Bible scenes and subjects, 
by which valuable suggestions may be given in regard to the use of the stereopti- 
con in teaching the Bible.* 

Mr. Burr's excellent course in sociology was repeated during the fall term 
and in connection with it, weekly meetings of a Social Science Club were held for 
the carrying on of special investigations, at which reviews of current events in the 
field of sociology were presented and reports were rendered by one and another of 
the" students concerning different institutions in the city, such as the Boys' Club, 
City Mission, Salvation Army, Jail, Almshouse, etc., and special investigations were 
carried on by the club, of the various influences affecting young men, such as home 
life, school, reading room, church, club, saloon, etc. Debates were held on inter- 
esting sociological cpuestions, and occasional reviews of the fresh literature on the 
subject were presented. 

Mr. Burr has also given instruction in ethics, and in Old Testament history. 

The instruction in vocal music has been a pronounced success. A course of 
twenty lessons was secured from Mr. Philip H. Buechler, a graduate of the con- 
servatories of music in Munich and Berlin, Germany. For several years Mr. 
Buechler has been devoting his life to the elevation of church music, that it may 
contribute directly and powerfully to the prime object of church life. 

This course of instruction awakened great enthusiasm among the students, 
and it is exceedingly gratifying to know that an arrangement may be made with 
Mr. Buechler, in every way advantageous to the School, whereby his valuable 
services to the students may be continued from year to year. 

Mr. James Naismith, the faithful and efficient and highly valued teacher on 
the subject of man, to our great regret, has felt called upon to offer his resignation 
as an instructor at the School, being desirous of devoting several years to practi- 
cal investigation and development of physical department work in connection with 
some city Association, and in the pursuit of medical studies. We are safe in say- 
ing that he .will retire to the great regret both of the faculty and the students of 



* Since this report was submitted arrangements have been made with Rev. Jas. M. Gray, of 
Boston, to give most of the instruction in the English Bible at the School next year. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



53 



the School, to whom he has endeared himself by his unremitting fidelity and help- 
ful labors, and he will take with him a hearty God speed as he enters upon his 
new line of work and study. 

Special Lectures : — 

The regular instruction of the School has been reinforced by special lectures 
on topics of great interest, and very practical value by men specially qualified to 
treat of them. The list includes President G. Stanley Hall of Clark University, 
who delivered a most scholarly address at the opening of the gymnasium building 
on "The Problem of Health"; Rev. Dr. Philip S. Moxom, who spoke on "The 
Norwegian System of Controlling the Sale of Intoxicating Liquors "; Dr. E. M. Hart- 
well on the "Use of the Play Instinct in Education"; Robert A. Woods of the 
Andover House, on "The Idea of Social Settlement Work"; while among 
other special addresses may be mentioned those of Charles T. Kissam, Plainfield, 
N. J., E. Porter Dyer, and Milton Bradley of this city; and from among the inter- 
national, state and leading local secretaries of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, the students have heard most profitably from John R. Mott, the College 
Secretary, George B. Hodge, Educational Secretary, Claus Olandt, Jr., German 
Secretary, and Dr. Charles A. Eastman, Indian Secretary of the International 
Committee, L. L. Doggett, State Secretary-elect of Ohio, George M. Hersey, 
General Secretary of the Hartford Association, Dr. J. H. McCurdy, Physical 
Director of the 23d street branch of the New York City Association, and Evange- 
lists S. M. Sayford and John H. Elliott, both of whom have been prominent 
leaders in Young Men's Christian Association work. 

Practical Work : — 

Excellent opportunities for such work have been afforded during the year by 
deputation meetings at no less than thirteen places within one or two hours' ride 
of Springfield ; by the district conference held at Northampton during April ; by 
the International Convention in this city, and the Secretaiial Conference in Hart- 
ford, and notably, by the new facilities for all departments of Association work 
provided in the new building of the local Association. 

Many of the students are also planning to do deputation work for a part of 
the summer in New York, Vermont, and New Hampshire under the direction of 
the State Young Men's Christian Association committees. 

Libraries : — 

The value of the Reference Library has been greatly augmented by the 
obtaining of an adjoining room, furnished with table and light, and open up to ten- 
o'clock in the evening, where the students have availed themselves, as never be- 
fore, of the opportunity of consulting the books on its shelves. 

The Historical Library has, during the past year, also been put to excellent 
use by some of the prominent leaders of the Association movement, who have 
borne willing testimony to the eminently practical value of such a collection of 
Association literature. 

A few valuable books have been added to the reference library by a friend in 
New Jersey, and others have been kindly donated by one of the students, a mem- 
ber of the graduating class. 



54 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



The School is greatly in need of a fund whereby the fresh literature that is 
constantly appearing upon the subjects that are taught at the School, may find a 
place on its shelves, as well as for the proper care and maintenance of the litera- 
ture already collected, to say nothing of a fire-proof building, in which the His- 
torical, Reference, and Physical Department libraries may be safely and perma- 
nently cared for. 

E xtension of the Curriculum to three years : — 

The question of lengthening the course of training to three years has been 
under discussion for a long time and last winter by a unanimous vote of the Exec- 
utive and Instruction committees, to whom the matter was referred with power 
by the Trustees at their December meeting, this step was determined upon. 

The growth of Association work, and the correspondingly increased respon- 
sibilities of the leaders of it, has been the underlying reason for taking this im- 
portant step, for it has led to the addition this year of a new department of 
instruction called the Educational, and to the addition from time to time of new 
branches of study, to which justice can no longer be done within the limit of the 
two years' course. 

Change of Holiday •' — 

During the last term the weekly holiday has been changed from Saturday to 
Monday, and the advantages have been such as to make it probable that the 
change will be a permanent one. 

Departments : — 

The superintendent of the Secretarial Department reports that he has received 
sixty-seven applications for help in securing secretaries the past year, as compared 
with thirty-nine the previous year, and that in response to these twelve men from 
the class of '94 and three from the class of '95 have been supplied. The prospect 
is also good that within a few weeks all of the graduates this year from this de- 
partment will have been engaged for active Association service. 

Mr. Bowne also reports that he has had three times as many inquiries concern- 
ing admission to the School this year as during the same period last year. 

The superintendent of the Physical Department reports that special attention 
has been paid in this department to different forms of healthful and popular 
athletic exercise. 

The department has been presented by some of its friends with oil paintings of 
Roth's model, which are of great service in the study of anatomy. 

During the International Convention half a day was given to an exhibit of the 
Physical Department work of the American Associations in the School's gymnasium 
and on its athletic field, under the direction of Dr. Gulick, assisted by other mem- 
bers of the faculty. The exercises were admirably managed, and served most 
favorably to advertise that department of the School's work among the many 
Association friends that attended the convention. 

Another Summer Conference for Physical Directors has been arranged by Dr. 
Gulick, and will be conducted during the ten days immediately following the close 
of the School year. 

Mr. D. F. Graham came to the School on the 1st of January to take up his 
work as superintendent of the new Educational Department. The work this year 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



55 



has necessarily been confined to giving the students of the Secretarial and Physical 
Departments a broader outlook over the educational field of the Young Men's 
Christian Association work, especially along industrial lines, for the purpose of 
making them more intelligently interested and effective in reaching and helping 
young men through the educational appliances of the Associations. Such appli- 
ances are especially adapted to reach and help the young mechanics, who constitute 
sixty per cent, of all our young men. 

During the fall term the way was prepared for Mr. Graham's further work, by 
the teaching of physics under Dr. Halsted's direction, and during the winter and 
spring terms this study has been followed by the study of chemistry and mathe- 
matics, together with mechanical laboratory work. 

The students have also had eminently practical training in the construction of 
partitions and the setting up of machinery in the basement of the gymnasium for 
the mechanical laboratory, as well as in the erection, during the Easter holidays, of 
the grand stand on the School's athletic grounds. 

The work of this department has been rendered possible by the gift of $i,coo 
from Mrs. E. S. Woods of this city, towards its equipment, supplemented by the gifts 
of machinery, or liberal reductions in the cost of them, by manufacturers in different 
parts of the country, with whom Mr. Graham has carried on an extended corre- 
spondence. The real value, therefore, of the equipment of this department to day 
is $2,512. One thousand dollars more is needed to complete its equipment, and a 
choice investment also of $2,000 is awaiting any able and willing friend who desires 
to give that amount as a permanent construction fund, — (o be used only in the pur- 
chase of material and payment of labor for the building of apparatus, the proceeds 
from the sale of which would a little more than repay the cost both of the material 
and labor in their construction. By this means the fund, instead of being gradually 
exhausted, would gradually increase. By occupying off hours in such work, the 
future students in this department would not only obtain the most practical kind of 
training in industrial work, but also assist themselves financially during their stay 
at the School. Mr. Graham reports good work accomplished on the part of the 
students, both in their studies and practical training; and, in response to an 
expressed desire of a number of secretaries for abetter insight into the work of the 
Associations' Educational Department, he has arranged for a Summer Conference, 
to be held at the same time as the Physical Department Conference, and immedi- 
ately following the close of this School year. 

Property Interests — The School 's Grounds : — 

It is a subject for thanksgiving and congratulation that during the past exceed- 
ingly trying financial year, good progress has been made in furthering the School's 
property interests. 

During the year about seventeen acres of land, out of the thirty owned by the 
School in the neighborhood of Massasoit Lake and separated from the rest by the 
New England railroad, have been exchanged for an equal acreage on the other side 
of the railroad, and immediately adjoining the other thirteen acres. This exchange 
has compacted the School's grounds, extended their frontage on the lake, brought 
a bonus of $3,000, and by it enabled the School to complete the payment for its 
grounds, and leave a balance of $602.18 to the account of the land fund. The pur- 
chase of the grounds and their improvement, aside from the recent equipment of 
the athletic grounds, represent an expenditure of $23,894.96, minus the balance on 
hand. 



56 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



Gymnasium : — 

The opening of the School's first building, its beautiful gymnasium, occurred 
on the 26th of October. 

Of the four donors, two, namely Mr. Preston B. Keith and Mr. Rowland 
Hazard, favored us with their presence, and with some remarks on that most happy 
occasion. 

The building was an occasion of rejoicing then and has continued to be ever 
since, having most admirably served its purpose in supplying to the Physical 
Department all the needed facilities for its work ; and has proved invaluable also 
in furnishing temporary accommodations for the entire laboratory work of the 
educational department, as well as temporary recitation rooms and offices for other 
departments of the School. 

We are under lasting obligations to the four friends who have honored them- 
selves and blessed the cause in the bestowal of such a princely gift. 

Dormitory Building Fund: — 

So keenly was the need of a dormitory felt, that the trustees at their December 
meeting voted, in spite of the hard times and the possible danger to the current 
expense fund, to push forward the dormitory enterprise. Accordingly this was 
done, and by the first of this month $20,000 in cash or in subscriptions payable 
by September 1 had been secured, and ground was broken for this all-important 
building, June 5. It is hoped that it will be completed and ready for occupancy by 
November 1. 

The exact statement of the dormitory fund up to date is as follows : — 
In hand towards construction, 511,316 16 

In hand towards furnishing, 809 21 

Making the total in hand, £12,125 37 

Subscriptions payable by September 1 towards 

construction, #7>355 66 

Towards furnishing, 423 00 

Or a total of subscriptions payable by September, of $7>778 66 

This, with $93.42 of interest money, makes the whole amount on hand or pay- 
able by September 1, $19,997.45. 

Towards this the total amount given or raised by the alumni is $9,428.71. 

In addition to this, there is in the shape of subscriptions fairly reliable, but not 
payable until after September, $4,716.63. making the amount eventually provided 
for, $24,714.08, and leaving only about $10,000 to be secured. 

Current Expenses : — 

The question of meeting the current expenses for the year has become a most 
serious one. 

The statement of the School's situation will be most clearly understood by a 
comparison of last year's receipts with those of the current year. 

Last year it was necessary to raise by subscription $17,058.72. This year, 
because of unexpected shrinkage in income from rent and tuition, and an unex- 
pectedly large interest account, it will be necessary to raise $17,994.63, or $935 91 
more than last year. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



57 



Last year the income from rent amounted to $998.27. This year it amounts to 
$802.73, or $195.54 less. Last year the income from tuition amounted to $3,026.05 ; 
this year to $2,229, or a decrease of $797.05. Last year there was received from 
voluntary gifts at the time of the annual meeting, $15,787.1 2 ; this year there has 
been received up to date only $8,566.37, or a decrease of $7,220.75. This shows a 
total falling off in income as compared with last year, on account of rent, tuition, 
and donations of $8,213.34. 

A careful and earnest effort has recently been made to enlist a widely extended 
co-operation on the part of many of the secretaries of our Associations, including 
the School's alumni and other friends, to provide this very large needed balance. 
It is impossible to say to day just what the results of the effort will be. It can 
not be said, however, that the outlook is very favorable, though the result may 
disappoint our fears. 



N. B. August 1, 1895, the actual shortage on income account for the past year 
is about $6,821. 



On behalf of the Trustees, 




TREASURER'S REPORT 



For Year 1894—95. 
Current Expense Account. 
Dr. 

Balance from last year, 51.075 62 

Contributions, 10,738 18 

Tuition, 2,229 °° 

Rent, 1,301 39 

Bills payable, 4,600 00 

Interest on deposits, 23 4S 



Cr. 

Salaries, $12,515 82 

General expense, 3-98' 5° 

Secretarial expense, 417 46 

Physical expense, M38 99 

Industrial expense, 180 69 

Rent, 40 00 

Interest, 334 08 



$19,967 67 



18,90s 54 

Balance carried to new year, $1,059 13 

Industrial Equipment Fund. 
Contribution, $1,000 00 

Disbursements, 1,000 00 

Land Fund. 

Dr. 

Balance from last year, $538 77 

Contributions, I >°53 94 

Interest on deposits, 1 1 46 

$1,604 17 

Cr. 

Expenditures on grounds, $990 53 

Expenditures on grand stand, 472 72 

1.463 25 

Balance carried to new year, $140 92 

Dormitory Fund. 
Dr. 

Balance fro;n last year, $3^897 67 

Contributions, miscellaneous, 7,608 69 

Interests on deposits, 41 25 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



59 



Contributions, "Alumni," $i,oco oo 

Contributions, " Jubilee Class," with interest, $518 78 



Less Jubilee photograph, 

Contributions, "Class of '95," 
Contributions, " Class of '96," 



Cr. 

Contractors, account building contract, 
Loan to gymnasium fund, 
Sundry expenses, 



Balance carried to new year, 



60 00 



458 78 
500 00 
500 00 



$2,217 65 
3,9CO 00 
194 22 



$14,006 39 



6,311 87 
$7,694 5 2 



Gymnasium Fund. 
• Dr. 



Balance from last year, 
Contributions, 
Tablet (special), 
Bills payable, 
Interest on deposits, 



Cr. 



Contractors, 
Heating, 
Architect, 
Grading, 
Tablet (special), 

Apparatus, furnishings, and miscellaneous, 
Interest, 



Balance carried to new year, 



$31 97 
9,500 00 

18 r co 
9,900 00 
14 26 



$13,951 00 
1,021 co 
250 00 
• 274 62 
181 00 
1,143 26 
483 81 



$19,627 



17,304 69 
$2,322 54 



Students' Loan Fund. 
Dr. 



Balance from last year, 
Loan returned with interest, 
Interest on deposits, 



Loan to students, 



Cr. 



$iii 17 

89 78 
2 54 



$125 00 



$203 49 
125 00 



$78 49 




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Consolidated with Putnam Tool Company. 

FITCHBURG, MASS., IT. S. A. 




Il-lnch Swing Speed and Drilling Lathe. 

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Standard High Grade Machine Tools for all purposes pertaining to 
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Yale University Gymnasium, - - New Haven, Conn. 
The Anderson Normal School of Gymnastics, 

New Haven, Conn. 

Athletic Club of the Schuylkill Navy, - Philadelphia, Pa. 
Chicago Athletic Club, - ... Chicago, 111. 

Dr. Holbrook's Military School, - - Sing Sing, N. Y. 
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San Jose Y. M. C. Association, - - San Jose, Cal. 

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Special inducements to Industrial Schools and Colleges. Specifications and 
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References: Leland Stanford Jr. University, Ca]., Tufts Co lege, Somerville, 
Mass., Townsend School, Newport, Kingston School, Kingston, R I , Y. M. 
C. A. Training School, Springfield, and Springfield Industrial Institute. 



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c 




International 
Young Men's Ghristian Association 
Training School, 

Springfield, Mass., U. S. A. 



Ninth Catalogue. 

1893-4. 



IMIVRSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Contents. 



PAGE' 

Admission, Terms of — Regular Courses, 34 

" " Correspondence Courses, . . . . 37, 38 

Association Work, Study of 20 

Bequest, Forms for Inside back cover 

Calendar, , . . . ...... . . 3 

Contributions, How Made, Etc., Inside back cover 

Corporation, . ... . . . . . . 4 

Correspondence Course — Secretarial Department, . . .. . . 36 

" " Physical Department, . . . . . 37 

Design,, . . .... . . . - \ 

Educational Department — Department Course, 27 

Expenses, Estimate of — Regular Courses, . . . . . . 35 

" " Correspondence Courses, . . . 37, 38 

General Course of Instruction, 10 

Graduation, Conditions of ... . • 33 

Industrial Education, Study of . . . . . . 27, 28 

Information, How to Get it, Outside back cover 

Instructors, 9 

Man, Study of "... . 14-19 

Officers, . . . . . . . . . . , • . ~ * ; r M 

Pedagogy, Study . . . . 19 

Physical Department — Department Course, 29-32 

" " Correspondence Course, 37 

Promotions, Conditions of 33 

Rooms and Bedding, . t . . 34 

Schedule of Class Work, . . 33 

Secretarial Department — Department Course, .... 20-24 
" " Special Lectures, ..... 24-26 

" " Correspondence Course, 36 

Sociology, Study of . . 16-18 

Students — Regular Session, 1893-4, 6,7 

" Correspondence, 8 

Text-Books, v • , . . 39 

Tuition (see Expenses above). 



1893-4. 



NINTH CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

International 
Young Men's Christian Association 
Training School, 




SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS. 



With Prospectus for 1804-5. 



JUNE, 1894. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. : 

LORING & AXTELL, Printers. 
1894- 



The Design of the School. 



To train young men for the work of Secretaries, Physical 
Directors, Educational Directors, or other officers of Young Men's 
Christian Associations.* 



*In view of the intimate relation held and the dominant influence exercised by the Young Men's 
Christian Associations over the religious life of the students in most of our colleges, quite a number 
of the graduates of the School's physical department have been led to take up the work of the Chris- 
tian Physical Director in one and another of the colleges in which these Associations exist, and have 
found excellent opportunity to use the special training furnished by the School for Association 
Physical Directors. In view of this fact the School is prepared to train Christian young men of 
proper qualifications, desirous of fitting themselves for the work of the College Physical Director or 
Instructor, whether they be employed by the college corporation or by the Christian students' 
organization within the college. 



Calendar, 



Commencement Exercises and Annual Meeting of the Corpora- 
tion and Board of Trustees, Wednesday, June 20, 1894. 

Quarterly Meetings of the Trustees on the third Wednesdays of 
March, September and December. 

Regular Meeting of the Instructors every Wednesday. 

Summer Conference on Physical Work August 31 to September 
5, inclusive. 



Tenth "Regular School year, 1894-5. 

Fail Term { Begins Wednesday afternoon, September 12, 1894. 

( Ends Wednesday evening, December 19, 1894. 

Winter Vacation. 

rp ( Begins Wednesday morning, January 2, 180 c. 

Winter Term ] 8 \ *" J y ' J: > 

( Ends Friday evening, March 22, 1895. 

Spring Vacation. 

( Begins Tuesday morning, April 2, 1895. 
Spring Term < Commencement Exercises, Wednesday evening, 
( June 19, 1895. 



Correspondence Courses. 

Students may engage in the Correspondence Courses at any time. 



The Calendar is subject to change. 



3 



Corporation. 



(As constituted in the summer of 1893.) 



The names of .the Trustees are italicized. 



Australia, N. S. W., Sydney, David Walker. 

Vict., Melbourne, H. A. Wilcox. 
France, Paris, E. Buscarlet. 
Germany, Berlin, Count Andreas Bernstorff. 
Gr. Britain. England, London, M. H. Hodder. 

W. H. Mills. 

** Scotland, Glasgow, W. M. Oatts. 

«« " Portobello, R. H. Smith. 

India, Bombay, Robert McCann. 

" Madras, W. Reirson Arbuthnot. 
" " David McConaughy, Jr. 

Japan, Tokyo, John T. Swift. 
Sweden, Stockholm, Baron Edward Barnekow. 
Switzerland, Geneva, Rev. Gustave Tophel. 
British 1 olumbia, Victoria, F. W. Teague. 
Manitoba, Winnipeg, C. M. Copeland. 

R. J. Whitla. 
Nova Scotia, Halifax, E. W. Gorton. 
Ontario, Toronto, F. M. Pratt. 
" " Thomas S. Cole. 

" " Robert Kilgour. 

Quebec, Montreal, D. A. Budge. 
" " George Reid. 

D. W. Ross. 
F. W. Kelley. 
Ala., Birmingham, Joseph Hardie. 
Cal., San Francisco, H. J. McCoy. 
Colo., Denver, Alfred W. Chamberlin. 

" " Donald Fletcher. 
Conn., Bridgeport, W. E Colley. 

J. W. Cook. 
" Hartford, Henry Roberts. 
" Stamford, C. L. Re id. 
Ga., Atlanta, W. Woods White. 
111., Chicago, I. E. Brown. 
Ind., Richmond, Albert G. Shepard. 

" Indianapolis T. A. Hildreth. 
Ia., Des Moines, W. A. Magee. 

" E. D. Sampson. 

Kan., Topeka, R. B. Gemmell. 
Ky., Louisville, J. L. Wheat. 
Md., Baltimore, W. H. Morriss. 
Mass., Amherst, Merrill E. Gates. 
" Boston, R. M. Armstrong. 
" Jnmes L. Gordon. 
" Charles A. Hopkins. 
" *' H. M. Moore. 

Cambridge, O. H. Durrell. 
" Campello, Preston B. Keith. 
" Fitchburg, Frederick Fosdick. 
" Lynn, T. E. McDonald. 
" Manchester, Russell Sturgis. 
" Nantucket, E A. Lawrence 
" Springfield, Dr W. F. Andrews. 

" Charles H. Barrows. 
" " H. H. Bowman. 

" J T. Bowne. 
" George D. Chamberlain. 
'* " E. Porter Dyer. 

" " Luther Gulick, M.D. 

" " Charles jacobus. 

" " Henry S. Lee. 

" " John McFeihries. 

" " Arthur G. Merriam. 



Mass., Springfield, Oliver C. Morse. 

" Rev. David Allen Reed. 

" " C. H. Southworth. 

" Worcester, William Woodward. 
Mich., Detroit, K. G. Van Tuyi. 
Minn., Minneapolis, C. E. Dyer. 

" " John H. Elliott. 

" St. Paul, Thomas Cochran. 
Mo., Kansas City, Witten McDonald. 

" St. Louis, George T. Coxhead. 

" " Thomas S. McPheeters. 

Neb., Omaha, J. C. Denise, M.D. 

" Yutan, Robert Weidensall. 
N. H., Concord, Allen Folger. 
N. J., Newark, Aaron Carter, Jr. 

Elkanah Drake. 

" New Brunswick, Frank L. Janeway. 

" Orange, D. F. More. 

" Plainfield, W. D. Murray. 

" Summit, Charles B. Grant. 
N. Y., Addison, Burton G. Winton. 

14 Brooklyn, F. B. Schenck. 

" Buffalo, S. M. Clement. 

" " John B. Squire. 

Medina, W. A. Bowen. 

" New York, Thomas K. Cree. 

C. C. Cuyler. 

" George A. Hall. 

" " R. R. McBurney. 

" " Richard C. Morse. 

" " J. Gardner Smith, M.D. 

" " Erskine Uhl. 

** " A. J. D. Wedemeyer. 

L. D. Wishard. 

" Troy, L. E. G7irley. 
N. C, Charlotte, L. A. Coulter. 

" Davidson College, Prof. H. L. Smith. 
Ohio, Cincinnati, H. P. Lloyd. 

H. Thane Miller. 
Ore., Portland, Noel H. Jacks. 
Penn., Berwick, C. H. Zehnder. 

" Erie, C. W. Davenport. 

" Philadelphia, John H. Converse. 

" " Thomas Dewitt (Cuyler. 

" " Rev Wallace Mc Mullen. 

" Pittsburg, 5". P. Harbison. 

" Scranton, H M. Boies. 
R. I., Providence, H. S. Conant. 
S. C, Charleston, A. T. Jamison. 

" Columbia, A. T. Smythe. 
Tenn., Chattanooga, J. B. Milligan. 

" Knoxville, James H Cowan. 

'* Nashville, James Bowron. 

J. B. O' Bryan. 
Texas, Dallas, A. K. Hardie. 

«' Fort Worth, Wiliam C. Winthrop. 
Vt., Brattleboro, Col. J. J. Estey. 

Burlington, W. J. Van Patten. 

" Montpelier, A. J. Howe. 

" St. Johnsbnry, Col. Franklin Fairbanks. 
Va., Richmond, Joseph Bryan. 
Wash., Seattle, E C Kilbourne. 

" Spokane, Walter Hughson. 
Wis., Milwaukee, George J Rogers. 



4 



Officers, 1893-4. 



President. 

CHAS. H. BARROWS, Springfield, Mass. 

Vice-President. 

PRESTON B. KEITH, Campello, Mass. 

Treasurer. 

GEO. D. CHAMBERLAIN, Springfield, Mass. 

Recording Secretary. 

F. W. MEYER, Springfield, Mass. 

Corresponding Secretary. 

OLIVER C. MORSE, Springfield, Mass. 

Assistant Secretary. 

GEO. D. BAKER, Springfield, Mass. 



Executive Committee. 

R. C. Morse. Erskine Uhl. Dr. W. F. Andrews. 
H; H. Bowman. 

With the President, Treasurer, and Corresponding Secretary ex offic 



Committee on Instruction. 

Henry S. Lee. E. Porter Dyer. Chas. Jacobus. 

Geo. D. Chamberlain. 

With the President ex officio. 



Finance and "Building Committee. 

Jno. McFethries. Chas. A. Hopkins. H. H. Bowman. 

Erskine Uhl. J. T. Bowne. 

Luther Gulick. 

With the President and Corresponding Secretary ex officio. 



Auditor. 

H. H. Bowman. 



5 



Students, 



Secretarial Department, 



Seniors. 

Austin, Burton Cyrus, 
Bunting, Albert Edward, 
Davey, Joseph John, 
Horner, Rudolf, 
King, Elisha Alonzo, 
Lantz, Christian, 
McCleery, William James, 
Ritchie, Mark, 
Rogers, Dwight Leete, 
Sibley, Frank Leroy, 
Triplett, Edward Mason, 
Worth, Elbridge Morseman, 



Juniors. 



Austin, Lewis Seybolt, 
Bell, Arthur Ferguson, 
Chase, Albert Burleigh, 
Cobleigh, Irving Vasa, 
Cotton, Arthur Norman, 
Crowe, Robert Oscar, 
Dudley, Joseph Matthews, 
Freer, Harvey Washington, 
Lohans, Herman Henry, 
McGown, Chester Stowe, 
Martin, Charles Alvin, 
Maylott, Worthy Francis, 
Merrill, Frank Herbert, 
Mogge, Ernest Louis, 
Mover, Elk an ah DeWilla, 
Page, John, 

Rogers, Josiah Winslow, Jr.. 



New York City. 
Ellenville, N. Y. 
New York City. 
Basel, Switzerland. 
Attleboro, Mass. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Spencerport, N. Y. 
Waltham, Mass. 
New Britain, Conn. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Burlington, Iowa. 
New Bedford, Mass. 

Paterson, N. J. 
Montreal, Can. 
Chelsea, Mass. 
Washington, D. C. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Truro, Nova Scotia. 
Clifton Forge, Va. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Lynn, Mass. 
Orange, Mass. 
Thompson ville, Conn. 
Nashua, N. H. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Robesonia, Pa. 
Palmer, Mass. 
Beverly, Mass. 



6 



Physical "Department. 



Seniors. 



Badger, John Edmund, 

Black, Jotham Frethey, 

Brown, Arthur White, 

Carey, Charles Henry, 

Dietz, Jr., Henry Louis, 

Foster, Jr., Festus Harvey, 

Gabler, George Lewis, 

Holman, Frank, 

Kinnicutt, William Henry, 

Lutz, John William, 

Martin, Rufus Jonathan, 

McKee, William Earl, 

Morgan, William George, 

Page, Pierson Sterling, 

Ross, Maurice, 

Theis, Emile Charles, 

Wall, Charles Fitzgerald Butler, 

Welzmiller, Jr., Louis, 



Hanover, N. H. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Yarmouth, N. S. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Oakland, Cal. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Oneida, N. Y. 
London, Ont. 
New Bedford, Mass. 
Beaver Falls, Pa. 
Port Hastings, N. S. 
Plainville, Conn. 
Lockport, N. Y. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Cape Breton, N. S. 
Paris, France. 
Holy Cross, Ireland. 
New York City. 



Special Students. 



Otto, Henry Ladd, 
Pollard, David Wright, 
Spence, Donald McKay, 
Webb, Albert Elmer, 



Williamsport, Pa. 
Pawtucket, R. I. 
Yarmouth, N. S. 
Providence, R. I. 



J uniors. 

Allen, Winfred Emery, 
Bartlett, Reuel Earnest, 
Denman, William V., 
Durand, William Balch, 
*Greenwald, James Andrew, 
Kill am, Frank, 
McIntire, Henry Jerome, 
Oller, Lawrence Shannon, 
Ruggles, Edwin Pakenham, 
Russell, Walter Burton, 



Indianapolis, Ind. 
New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Hasbrouck, N. Y. 
Maiden, Mass. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Yarmouth, N. S. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
Milton, Mass. 
Springfield, Mass. 



Studied only part of the year. 



7 



Correspondence Students, 1893-4. 



Secretarial Department. 



Benton, Arthur L., Gen. Sec. R. R. Branch, Collinwood, Ohio. 
Chatterson J. Henry, Eau Claire, Wis. 

Dowling, John S., Ticonderoga, N. Y. 

Downs, Frederick Corson, Assistant Sec, New Haven, Conn. 
Fagan, J. Edward, General Secretary, Lansingburgh, N. Y. 
Hastings, Clarence E., Asstant Secretary, Newark, N. J. 
Jessup, Sam'l S., Assistant Secretary, 23d St., N. Y. City. 

Maines, William H., Assistant Secretary, Paterson, N. J. 
Megginson, W. S., Assistant Secretary, Atlanta, Ga. 
Morrison, F. S., General Secretary, Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

Payson, Edw'd J., General Secretary, Chatham, N. B. 

Pond, Bert Chauncey, Assistant Secretary, Bangor, Me. 



Physical Department. 



Benson, A. C, 
Close, Geo- H., 
Davis, A. B., 

Graham, James, Acting Physical Director, 

Guilford, E. W., Physical Director, 

Martin, G. M., Physical Director, 

Robertson, A., Asst. Sec. and Phys. Dir., 

Rudolph, Walter, 

Sauerbrey, H. S., 

Taylor, Samuel S., 

Thornberry, R. W., 

Wilder, E. W., Physical Director, 

Wolf, A. F., Physical Director, 



Worcester, Mass. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Fitchburg, Mass. 
Cleveland, O. 
McKeesport, Pa. 
Youngstown, O. 
Zanesville, O. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Owatonna, Minn. 
Bellefonte, Pa. 
Salem, O. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Wilkesbarre, Pa. 



8 



Instructors. 



General Course. 

OLIVER C. MORSE, 219 Florida Street, 
Authorship of the Bible and Christian Evide?ices. 

REV. T. H. HAWKS, D.D., 626 Worthington Street, 
Bible History, Exegesis, and Church History. 

JAMES McCONAUGHY, Mt. Hermon, Mass., 
Studies in the Life of Christ. 
JAMES NAISMITH, A.B., 92 Buckingham Street, 
Man, as an Individual. 

REV. HANFORD M. BURR, 159 Princeton Street, 
Ma?i, in his Relationships. 



Secretarial Department. 

J. T. BOWNE, Supt. of Dept., 35 Clarendon Street, 
Secretarial Department Course. 

CHARLES F. POWLISON, 219 Florida Street, 
Methods of Christian Work, Department Correspondence Course. 

F. W. MEYER, Gen. Sec, Y. M. C. A., 998 State Street, 
Applied Committee Work. 



Physical Department. 

LUTHER GULICK, M.D., 153 Westminster Street, 
Supt. of Dept. and Instructor. 

F. N. SEERLEY, M.D., 10 Merrick Avenue, 

Anatomy, Physiology of Exercise, etc. 

ALFRED T. HALSTED, M.D., Alden Street, 
Literature of Physical Education, Department Correspondence Course. 



^Educational Department. 

D. H. GRAHAM, Supt. of Dept., Springfield, Mass., 
Industrial Education, llieory and Practice. 



*ijce "A New Department," page 10. 



Course of Study. 



The course of study outlined in the following pages is the one 
which will be taken by the class enter i?tg in 1894. The class gradu- 
ating in 1895 will complete the course outlined in the catalogue of the 
year i?i which they entered. 

^. . ^ As the result of much careful discussion, 

Changes in Course ^ . w . , . , , . , ' 

of study. extensive changes have been made in the 

course of study to be followed in this school. 
These changes are of such significance and importance that it is 
believed they mark a new era in the history of the school. 

_ M ^ . First in importance is the opening of a new 

TV /Mew Department. department? the Educational Department, in 
which those who wish to prepare for the supervision of the educa- 
tional work of an Association will receive the special instruction 
necessary to fit them for such intelligent supervision. 

_ , • _ Qf the lines of educational work carried on 

Educational Work of , ,, A . . r . 

the Association. b y tne Associations of America, none are 
more important than those which aid young 
men in solving the problem of self-support. 

The commercial and the industrial classes 

3 du£r. r a. elates \ eem t0 . offer *e greatest opportunity in 
these directions. The General Secretary 
who is intelligently to supervise such classes must as far as possible 
be acquainted with the subjects themselves and how they can best be 
taught in the Association. It is one aim of this new department of 
the school to give all taking the secretarial course such knowledge. 

The Associations in the medium-sized and 
Training for Super- sma]ler towns will sca rcely be able to secure 

vision of Industrial . . f . . . . J t . , , . , 

Class Work. tne time °* desirable men to give the kind 

of attention to this department that is war- 
ranted by its importance. In such places the Secretary himself 
should be competent to plan and to an extent to carry on such work. 
This is merely the extension to the Educational Department of the 
policy which already obtains in the Physical Department. 

The general plan of the course of instruc- 
Pian of the Course. tion is that students preparing to be General 

Secretaries take a complete and general view 
of the whole field. Those preparing for the Physical and Educational 
Departments take a less thorough view of the whole, but a far more 
thorough study of their special departments. 



10 



Outline of the Course. 



THE BIBLE: [See page 12; taken by all students.] 

A general study of the Bible ; what it is, its authority, what it 
contains, and how to use it. 

MAN : [See page 14; taken by all students.] 

A general study of the physical, mental and moral natures and 
relationships of man, including Physiology, Physiology of 
Exercise, Hygiene, Personal Purity, First Aid to the Injured, 
Massage, Gymnastic Therapeutics, Anthropometry, Physical 
Measurements and Examination, Prescription of Exercise, 
Physiological Psychology, Ethics, Sociology, Pedagogy, etc. 

For those in the Physical Department special amplifi- 
cation is made of such studies as Physiology of Exercise, 
Physical Examination, Anthropometry, Gymnastic Thera- 
peutics, Prescription of Exercise, etc. 

ASSOCIATION WORK: 

An outline of this course as studied by the Secretarial and 
Educational Department students is given on pages 20-24. 
The Physical Department students cover the same outline, but 
with less general detail, giving special attention to the 
organization and conduct of the Physical Department of the 
Association. 

EDUCATIONAL WORK. 

General and Industrial: [Seepage 27; taken by stu- 
dents in Secretarial and Educational Departments.] 

This most important and significant addition to the work of 
the school includes Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Draw- 
ing and practical instruction in work in wood, iron, etc., to fit 
men for intelligent supervision of the industrial work which in 
the Association is to be a great avenue of work among the 
artisan classes of young men. 

PRACTICE: [See page 31. J 

Under this head are included athletics, gymnastics and shop 
work, varied in time according to the needs of the different 
departments ; also committee work in the local Associations. 



1 1 



Outline of Bible Study. 



Authorship of the Bible. 

This course is, in its nature, introductory to the study of the 
Bible, and will deal with the question of the authority of the Bible in 
the light of both its human and divine authorship. Such a course 
should be helpful in determining the spirit, and to some extent, the 
manner of approach to the intelligent study of the Bible. 

First will be considered the human authorship of the Scriptures, 
involving their genuineness and authenticity from an historical stand- 
point. The included topics will be : 

1. Method of determining the canon of Scripture ; 

2. A glance into the literary sources of the Scriptures, — Mss. 
and versions ; 

3. The formation of the Old Testament canon ; 

4. The origin and character of the Old Testament apocrypha; 

5. Testimony of Sacred and profane writers to the Old Testa- 
ment Scriptures as the word of God ; 

6. Why a New Testament canon ? 

7. Testimony of the fathers of the first three centuries to the 
canonicity of the New Testament books. 

Second, will be considered the divine authorship of the Bible, 
or inspiration, including the following topics : 

1. Differences between inspiration, revelation and spiritual 
illumination ; 

2. Inspiration viewed in the light of its effect ; 

3. Historical view of it ; 

4. Theories concerning its nature and extent ; 

5. Scripture teaching, and the value of it ; 

6. Proofs of the Scripture teaching. 

This course will be given in the form of lectures, with the aid of 
the blackboard and a specially prepared syllabus, or series of outlines, 
for each student. 

Evidences of Christianity. 

The object of this course is to show the reasonableness of 
Christianity or the religion of the Bible, and its claims for acceptance, 
that the student may the more clearly apprehend the grounds of his 
own faith in the religion of Jesus Christ, and that he may be the better 
prepared to present them to others so as to confirm their faith, or 
meet their doubts and answer their objections. 

After a general discussion of the nature of evidence, the ques- 
tions of the theist versus the atheist and pantheist; of the believer 
in a supernatural revelation, versus the deist and rationalist, and of 
the Christian religion versus the leading religions of heathendom, will 
be briefly presented, leading up to a consideration of the direct and 
positive grounds, both miraculous and moral, of Christian faith. 

This course, like that on Bible Authorship, will be given in 
lecture form, with the aid of blackboard and syllabus. 



12 



Biblical History. 

Is pursued under the ruling idea that the Bible sets forth the gradual 
unfolding of the purpose and plan of God for the salvation of men. 
A logical division of the history into periods, a careful study of its 
turning points and of the influence of lawgiver and prophet, with a 
constant reference to the relations of the chosen people to other 
nations, enables the student to see how the way was prepared for the 
coming of the predestined Saviour. 

Outline Studies in the Life of Christ. 

These studies will present, in their probable order, the leading 
events in our Lord's ministry, as a framework for further study of its 
details. His words and His works, the great discourses and most 
notable " signs," will be studied in their relation to His mission, and 
with special application to the young men of to-day. To guide the 
student in fruitful methods of studying the Gospels for himself and 
teaching them to others will be the leading purpose in this work. 
As an aid to its accomplishment, printed outlines will be furnished 
with questions for individual study and references to useful helps. 

"Christ Among Men." 

The revised course for Workers' Training Classes, recently 
published by the International Committee. 

This course takes up the interviews of Christ with individuals, 
following the same order which has already been observed in the 
" Outlines." It aims, by the study of Christ's own spirit, methods 
and doctrine, to make intelligent and efficient personal workers. 
Students will be encouraged to report, either privately or in class, any 
obstacles encountered in their own attempts to do personal work, 
and will receive such counsel and help as the teacher can give. 

Apostolic and Church History. 

Following the study of the life of Christ, will show the founding 
and development of the kingdom of God under the reign of the 
glorified Christ. 

Exegesis. 

In Exegesis the principles of interpretation are inculcated, and 
so far as the limited time given to the study will permit, the student 
is made familiar with right methods of exposition. 

Study of the Books of the Bible. 

To show the place and value of each of these books in the 
progress of revelation, that the student may be able to use them 
intelligently in their proper relation. 

Fundamental Truths. 

Outline of the fundamental truths of the Bible which are held in 
common by the evangelical churches. 



■3 



Study of Man. 



Object. 

The object of this course is to give each man a knowledge and 
appreciation of his own constitution and powers, physical, intel- 
lectual, and spiritual, leading up to the study of his relations to him- 
self, to his fellow men, and to his God ; that he may develop himself, 
and that he may be able intelligently to deal with others, helping 
them to perfect themselves. It is taken by all the students. 

The Studies. 

The course includes the following studies in outline : 

PHYSICS : 

The laws that govern gases will be studied, that the whole 
theory of respiration may be thoroughly understood ; the laws 
governing liquids, to give a clear comprehension of the physi- 
ology of digestion and circulation. The study of solids will 
be from the standpoint of mechanics ; this will give a basis for 
a thorough study of the different gymastic and athletic events, 
from both the hygienic and economic standpoints. 
This study will conclude with a view of the laws of the uni- 
verse as a whole, leading the student to recognize God in all 
things. 

CHEMISTRY : 

The chemistry of the constituent elements of the body will 
be taken up, with especial reference to the foods that ought 
to be used, particularly in " training," and in making the 
weak strong ; a brief view of the process of crystallization 
will also be taken. 

BIOLOGY : 

The next step is a view of the principles of biology, bringing 
in enough of botany and zoology to show man's place in the 
organized world, and his relation to the other creatures. 

ANATOMY : 

The structure of man will be treated of in such a way as to 
give a working knowledge of the bones as levers, the muscles 
as powers, and the nerves which furnish the stimulus to 
action. 



PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS : 



A study of the different measurements of the body and how 
to take them, giving a basis for the teaching of athletics from 
a mechanical standpoint, for prescription of exercise, the 
principles of which will also be taught, and furnishing data 
for anthropometric charts. 

PHYSIOLOGY : 

This study will include the arrangement of the vital organs 
with a careful study of their functions, and the causes which 
affect their operations. Muscular action will receive special 
attention, emphasis being laid upon the relation of exercise 
to the different functions of the body. The nervous system 
will also be carefully treated. 

HYGIENE : 

Considered in connection with physiology, and consisting of 
a study of the best methods of preserving the body in a 
healthy condition. 

PERSONAL PURITY: 

This subject will be carefully treated from the physiological, 
psychological, and ethical standpoints. 

TRAINING : 

A discussion of the best ways of making the most of the act- 
ive powers, with consideration of the different systems in 
vogue. 

FIRST AID TO THE INJURED: 

A course fitting the men to care for injured persons till medi- 
cal assistance arrives. 

PSYCHOLOGY : 

This subject comprises a study of the brain and its functions, 
of sensation, perception, the stream of thought, association of 
ideas, habit, memory, imagination, reasoning, production of 
movement (considered from the psychological point of view), 
the natural and moral affections, the will, the religious feel- 
ings, worship, etc. 



Following this study of man as an individual comes the study 
of man in his relationships, including Ethics, Sociology and 
Pedagogy. 



l 5 



Ethics. 



Covering the duties of man as a free moral agent. 

Text-book: Dr. Mark Hopkins' Law of Love and Love as a 
Law. 

Sociology.* 

"That Gospel, which in its highest unity is Love, is divided into 
two parts : the first is Theology, which is an elaboration of the first 
part of Christ's epitome of the Law, 1 Thou shalt love the Lord 
thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy 
mind, and with all thy strength ; ' the second is Sociology — the 
science of society — which is an elaboration of the second part of 
the epitome of the Law, 'Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.'" 
—Richard T. Ely. 

Object : The object of the course is twofold : 

(1) To acquaint the Association Worker with the nature and 
extent of the social problems of the age, especially such problems as 
will most concern him in his special field of work. 

(2) To suggest the nature and use of those principles and 
forces which may be brought to the solution of these problems. 

The Need : The Department of Practical Christian Sociology is the 
outcome of a necessity and an opportunity. The necessity is found 
in the fact that scientific diagnosis must precede successful med- 
ication and treatment in the healing of the moral and spiritual 
man, as well as in the healing of the physical man. The oppor- 
tunity is found in the absorbing interest in social questions which 
characterizes the age, and in the readiness of the helpful forces 
of society to be called forth to active service. We feel that the 
opportunity imposes an obligation. 

Hence the Department of Practical Christian Sociology, in which 
the student will have the opportunity of studying the social problems 
of the day from a practical Christian, and, at the same time, scientific 
standpoint. 

METHOD OF INSTRUCTION: 

Instruction will be given by lectures, carefully prepared courses 
of reading and class debates, to some of which the entire school will 
be invited. 



*The outline of this course is given at considerable length, inasmuch as the subject is a new one 
both to the school and to the public. 



16 



General Outline of Study. — Senior tjear. 
First and Second Terms. 

INTRODUCTORY : General view. 

Christian Sociology as a science ; its scope and relation to 

kindred sciences. 
The relation of the Christian church to social science and 

social problems. 
The relation of the Young Men's Christian Association to the 

same. 

Some Present-Day Problems of Sociology. 

A. THE WAGE EARNER: 

I. The wage-earner in his relation to the employer and capi- 
talist. The actual and ideal relation contrasted. The the- 
ory and practice of wages, hours of labor and strikes and 
lockouts. 

1. Source of Wages: Wage fund theory. 

Product theory. 
Henry George's theory. 
George Gunton's theory. 
Relation of wages to strikes. 

2. Hours of Labor : The length of the ideal working 
day with reference to different kinds of business ; its 
bearing on health, happiness, morality, and the prog- 
ress of Christianity. The economic value of shorter 
hours. 

3. Strikes and Lockouts : Causes and consequences. 
Their relation to business, good government and social 
order. The Homestead strike studied from the ethical 
and moral standpoint. 

II. The wage-earner in his relation to his fellows. Trades 
Unions, Labor Leagues and Guilds ; their principles, meth- 
ods, failures, successes, and possibilities. History of 
Labor Movement. 

III. The wage-earner in his relation to the Christian Church 
and Christian Institutions. 

Study of the situation and the causes. Investigations in 
Massachusetts in 1892. 

IV. The true source of hope for the wage-earner. 

A laborer's view, an employer's, an economist's, a Christian's. 



7 



Subjects for discussion: 

1. The Sabbath in relation to the interests of capital and 
labor. Ethical value of rest. History of Sunday labor 
in Europe. A warning. 

2. Why are the workingmen, as a class, not in our churches ? 

3. Why does the Young Men's Christian Association, at 
present, appeal more to the commercial than to the indus- 
trial class ? Study of efforts and experiments in that 
direction. 

THE POOR AND CRIMINAL CLASSES: 

I. The Situation : Pauper and penal statistics. The relation 
of poor wages to pauperism and crime. The causes of 
poverty: Ignorance, incapacity, improvidence, injustice, 
intemperance, misfortune, and wickedness. 

Special study of the Tempera?ice Question and Tenements 
and Tenement House Reform. 

Subject for class discussion : 

Which is the more effective, drunkenness as a cause of 
poverty, or, poverty as a cause of drunkenness ? 

II. Rescue and Redemptive Work: Methods, agencies, institu- 
tions ; City missions ; Philanthropic institutions — religious 
and secular; Charitable orders and brotherhoods; the 
Salvation Army ; Manual and Technical training schools ; 
Reformatories and prisons. 

III. The function of government in relation to the laboring, 
the dependent and destructive classes. Theories : Individ- 
ualism, Paternalism, Socialism. 

IV. The relation of Christianity to these classes. 

1. Scientific diagnosis — careful study of the needs. 

2. The application of the fundamental principles of Christ- 
ianity, " Love to God and love to man." Christian 
versus heathen economics. 

3. Biblical Sociology. 

V. The relation of the Youmg Men's Christian Association to 
these classes and their problems. 

1. The young man a problem himself: His needs, tempta- 
tions, and possibilities. 

2. The young man faces these problems in their aggra- 
vated form. 

3. The young man stands for the force which, wisely 
directed, will, under the Providence of God, help to solve 
these problems. 



8 



Pedagogy. 



This course is new this year. A somewhat detailed outline is therefore given. 

The Young Men's Christian Association is an educator of the 
young men whom it reaches. The aim of education is development. 
Development of men is the constant aim of the Association. In 
order that it may secure this it is doing more and more teaching. It 
is giving practical training for life and work to thousands of young 
men who are cut off from school or college. Some of our leading 
associations have men enough in their educational classes to match 
our universities. Few progressive Associations are without special 
educational work of some kind. 

The General Secretary, as the leader of the Association, 
must have most of the teacher's work, and so, much of the teacher's 
training. He will not always be a teacher of classes to a large 
extent, but he must be able to wisely plan and develop the educa- 
tional work. 

The Physical Director, in his special field, will be largely 
occupied with teaching. His every day work will be the teaching of 
classes. He, in a peculiar way, must have the teacher's instinct and 
the teacher's art. 

The Educational Director, when he comes (and he is 
coming), will need to be an educator of a high order to wisely direct 
the complex educational work which is rapidly developing in the 
Association. 

The course in Pedagogy has been shaped so as to give the 
student some of the fundamentals of the art and science of teaching. 

The following will indicate the general scope of the course which 
will be pursued by lecture, text book and selected readings. 

I. The aim of Education. 

II. The development of modern educational methods. 

III. The psychology of teaching. 

IV. The scope of the educational work of the Association. 

V. The arrangement of courses of study and the forming of 
classes. 

VI. The selection of teachers. 

VII. The choice and use of text-books. 

VIII. The educational use of books and current literature. 

IX. The Bible class. Using " Teachers and Teaching," by 
H. C. Trumbull, as a book of reference. 



19 



Association Work. 



Instructors, J. T. Bowne and Dr. F. N. Seerley. 

This course is taken by all students, but in different classes, the 
Secretarial and Educational Department students taking it under Mr. 
Bowne, and the Physical Department students under Dr. Seerley. 
Each class covers the same general outline, but the Physical Depart- 
ment students, spend a larger portion of time on the Physical Depart- 
ment section, and a less amount on the rest, than do the students in 
the other departments. 

Outline. 

FIRST DIVISION — The Field, Objects, and History. 

i . The Field and Its Limits : 

(A) The Work — why needed; (B) A Definite Work — for 
and by young men ; (C) The Aim Distinctively Religious; 
(D) Relation to the Church; (E) Relation to Other Relig- 
ious Societies. 

2. Summary of the Objects and Work: 

(A) The Means Employed in Cities ; (B) The Means Employed 
in Small Towns. 

3 . The Rise and Growth of the Associations : 

(A) Origin of the Present Movement; (B) Earlier Work for 
Young Men ; (C) Introduction into America and Work 
Prior to the Civil War ; (D) Army Work ; (E) Resumption 
of Home Work; (F) Development of the Work; (G) Loy- 
alty to the Church. 

SECOND DIVISION — The Organization and its Home. 

4. Organization : 

(A) When and How to Organize ; (B) Practical Hints. 

5 . The Constitution : 

(A) General Considerations ; (B) A Suggestive Outline. 

6. Branches and Sub- Organizations. 

7. T^he Management : 

(A) The Directors ; (B) The Officers. 

20 



8. Standing Committees : 

(A) Importance, Enlistment and Composition ; (B) How to 
Organize, the Chairman, etc. ; (C) Principles and Methods 
of Construction ; (D) Names and Duties. 

9. Membership : 

(A) Classes of Membership ; (B) How to Secure Members ; 
(C) The Membership Committee ; (D) How to Retain 
Members ; (E) Fees, Tickets, Records and Exchange ; (F) 
The Development of Active Members ; (G) The Associate 
Membership and its Relations ; (H) The Members' Meet- 
ing, or Reception. 

10. 7 he General Secretary : 

(A) The Office and Work ; (B) The Qualifications. 

11. The General Secretary — His -Relationships : 

(A) To Churches and Pastors ; (B) To Officers, Directors 
and Committees; (C) To Other Employes; (D) To the 
Members; (E) To the Religious Work ; (F) To the Busi- 
ness Community ; (G) To his Fellow Secretaries. 

12. The General Secretary — Personal Hints. 

(1) Accepting a Call, (2) Beginning Work, (3) Correspond- 
ence, (4) Prominent Visitors, (5) System, (6) Memorandum 
Books, (7) Statistics, (8) Human Nature, (9) Dress, (10) 
Conversation, (n) Economy, (12) The Other Sex, (13) 
Health, (14) Growth, (15,) Spiritual Life. 

13. Securing and Training Employed Officers: 

(A) Demand and Supply ; (B) Methods of Training. 

14. The Association Home: 

(A) Advantages of Owning a Building ; (B) Location ; (C) 
Arrangement and Construction ; (D) Equipment. 

15. The Care of the Home: 

(A) General Principles ; (B) Repairs and Safety ; (C) Order 
and Cleanliness. 

16. How to Get a Building : 

(A) Preparatory Work; (B) Plan of a Canvass; (C) Hints 
and Cautions. 

17. The Building Movement: 

Its Beginning and Growth. 



21 



THIRD DIVISION — Methods of Work* 



1 8. Current Finances: 

(A) Ways and Means — (i) annual budget, (2) income, (3) 
solicitation ; (B) Collections and Disbursements ; (C) Finan- 
cial Book-keeping. 

19. Real Estate and Endowme?it Funds : 

(A) Incorporation ; (B) Trustees ; (C) Endowment ; (D) 
Debt, Taxes, Insurance, and Leases. 

20. Records and Public Presentation of the Work : 

(A) Records and Statistics; (B) Anniversaries; (C) The 
Parlor Conference; (D) Printed Matter — (1) the bulletin 
(2) annual reports, etc. 

21. The Bible in Associatio?i Work:~\ 

(A) Individual Study — objects, methods and helps; (B) 
Class Study — (1) a Bible class indispensable, (2) relation 
of the general secretary, (3) divisions, beginners, advanced 
and training classes, (4) time, place, and appliances, (5) 
the teacher, (6) the class, (7) the topics, (8) preparing the 
lesson, (9) teaching the lesson, etc. ; (C) Practical Work 
with the Unconverted — (1) personal work, (2) the evange- 
listic Bible class, (3) the Bible in the evangelistic meeting ; 
(D) Bible readings. 

22. Religious Meetings, etc. : % 

(A) The Young Men's Meeting; (B) Other Meetings at the 
Rooms; (C) Religious Work Outside the Rooms — (1) in 
boarding houses, (2) work in public institutions, (3) ser- 
mons to young men, (4) distribution of religious reading 
matter, (5) the invitation committee. 

23. The Place and Value of the Secular Agencies. 

24. The Educational Department as a Department of Association Work: 

In previous years Mr. Bowne has given instruction upon this subject, 
but with the opening of the new Educational Department of the School, it 
will be much more fully covered, especially along industrial lines. For 
full outline see page 27. 

25. The Physical Department as a Department of Association Work : 

(A) Aim of the Department — (1) health, (2) education, (3) 
recreation ; (B) Conditions under which a Physical Depart- 
ment should be started ; (C) Scientific Equipment and- 
Methods — (1) examinations, (2) statistics, (3) prescription 
of exercise; (D) Practical Equipment and Methods — (1) 

♦Methods of Work are fully illustrated by approved record blanks and printed matter, and 
wherever possible, practice will be required. 

t This is in addition to the study of the Bible in the General Course. 

% Methods of work in the Religious Department are taught practically throughout the entire 
course. 



22 



location and arrangement of gymnasium, (2) bath and 
dressing rooms, (3) outfit of gymnasium, (4) methods of 
gymnastic work, (5) out-door work; (E) The Religious 
Work; (F) The Physical Director; (G) The Department 
Committee. 

26. The Social Department : 

(A) The Reception Committee ; (B) The Social Rooms ; (C) 
Social Entertainments. 

27. Information and Relief: 

(A) Boarding Houses ; (B) The Employment Bureau ; (C) 
Savings Bureau and Benefit Fund ; (D) Visiting the Sick ; 
(E) Destitute Young Men. 

28. Work for Boys: 

(A) History ; (B) Necessity, Aim and Benefits ; (C) Organiza- 
tion ; (D) Different Classes; (E) Methods and Agencies — 
(1) religious, (2) educational, (3) physical, (4) social. 

29. Work for Special Classes: 

(A) College Students — history, methods, outgrowths; (B) 
Railroad Men — (1) history, (2) aims and benefits, (3) organi- 
zation and finance, (4) rooms and methods; (C) Commercial 
Travelers — the field, work and agencies ; (D) Other Nation- 
alities — (1) the field, (2) the German work, (3) the Colored 
work, etc.; (E) Miscellaneous Classes — (1) soldiers and 
sailors, (2) deaf mutes, (3) lumbermen, (4) firemen, police- 
men, street car employes, etc. 

30. Women 's Work for Young Men : 

Organization and Methods. 

FOURTH DIVISION — General Supervision and Extension. 

3 1 . State and Provincial Work : 

(A) History; (B) The State Committee; (C) Finances; (D) 
The State Secretary; (E) The State Convention — (1) pre- 
paratory work by the state committee, the programme, the 
convention circular, (2) preparatory work by local associa- 
tion, (3) at the convention; (F) The District Work — (1) 
the committee, (2) conferences and visitation, (3) corres- 
ponding members ; (G) The Relation of Local Associations 
to the General Work. 

32. 2 he American Ititernational Work: 

(A) History and Organization; (B) The Field; (C) The 
Work — (1) supervision and extension, (2) correspondence, 
(3) publications, (4) securing and training employed officers, 
(5) aid to building enterprises, (6) aid in securing funds, (7) 



23 



aid to state and other conventions, (8) help in disaster, (9) 
secretaries of the committee, (10) international finances, 
(11) international conventions, (12) day and week of prayer. 

33. The World's Alliance: 

History, Organization and Work. 



Text-Book : "Hand-book of the History, Organization and 
Methods of Work of Young Men's Christian Associations — Edition 
of 1892." This book was prepared primarily for the use of this 
school. 

During the entire course the students will have access to the 
City Library of more than 80,000 volumes, to the School Library 
and to the Historical Library of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tions ; and will also be required to engage in special courses of read- 
ing in connection with the department work. 

Department Practice. 

The Associations of Springfield are consolidated on the metro- 
politan plan. 

The Juniors are required to become members of the Armory Hill 
Branch before October first ; to do regular practical work on one or 
more of its standing committees ; and to attend all stated meetings 
of the committees to which appointed. 

The same is required of the Seniors in connection with the Central 
Branch, unless preparing especially for Railroad work, when they 
will unite with the Railroad Branch. 

All are given practice in preparing monthly reports of commit- 
tees, minutes of meetings, items for newspapers and bulletins, 
printers' copy and proof reading ; and are expected to attend each 
year at least two Association Conventions. The instructors decline 
to grant leave of absence to attend conventions other than those 
prescribed in the Department Course. 

Students will be marked for practice as for any other work of 
the course. 

Special Lectures and Conferences — 1893-94. 

April 25, 1893. — W. D. Murray, President Y. M. C. A., Plain- 
field, N. J., and member of the International Committee. " The 
Field is the World." 

May 1. — S. M. Sayford, College Evangelist. " The Promotion 
of Spiritual Power." 

May 23. — R. M. Armstrong, State Secretary of Mass. " The 
Second Greatest Need — Good Business Management." 

May 26. — Alexander Lamb, Captain in Salvation Army. 
" Dangers in Soul Winning." 



24 



May 29. — S. A. Taggart, Secretary International Committee. 
" Education as related to the Extension of the Young Men's Christ- 
ian Association." 

June 2. — George A. Hall, State Secretary of New York. 
" The Secretary as a Personal Worker." 

Sept. 26. — Frank Willcock. "Student Work in the Slums 
of N. Y. City." 

Oct. 17. — Thomas Elgar, of New York City. "Work among 
Prisoners." 

Oct. 17. — L. D. Wishard, Secretary International Committee. 
" Fundamental Principles of the Work of the International Committee 
in Foreign Mission Lands; and again, Nov. 21, "How the Local 
Secretary may co-operate with the International Committee in the 
Foreign Department of its Work." 

Jan. 9, 1894. — Edward A. Hill, of the Springfield Republican. 
"The Association and the Newspaper." 

Jan. 29. — Sumner F. Dudley, Assistant State Secretary of 
New York. " Organization and Re-organization of Boys' Work." 

Feb. 12. — George B. Hodge, Secretary of International Com- 
mittee. " Recent Developments in the Educational Department ; " 
and again, Feb. 13, " The Relation of the Association to Industrial 
Class Work." 

Feb. 14. — George B. Kilbon, Principal Springfield Manual 
Training School, and President of the Manual Training Teachers 
Association of America. " The Place of Manual Training in the 
Educational System of to-day;" Feb. 15, "Practical Illustrations 
of Manual Training in Wood and Iron Work at the Manual Training 
School." 

Feb. 16. — Dr. D. E. Yarnell, General Secretary Young Men's 
Institute Branch, New York City. " Ways and Means of Reaching 
and Helping Mechanics." 

Feb. 19. — C. E. Wilde, of New York City, for seventeen years 
manager and buyer for A. T. Stewart. " Men Wanted ! " 

Feb. 27. — Prof. Charles Jacobus, Principal Springfield High 
School. " Memory Helps." 

March 6. — Rev. H. M. Burr, of Springfield. " Social 
Settlements." 

March 10. — Elkanah Drake, Chairman New Jersey State 
Committee of Young Men's Christian Associations. " What I know 
of the Essentials to Success." 

March 20. — Rev. Dr. William Rice, Librarian Springfield 
City Library. " How to use the Library." 

March 22. — Edwin D. Ingersoll, of Denver, Col. "The 
Beginnings of Railroad Association Work." 



2 5 



April 1 6. — Clarence J. Hicks, Secretary International Com- 
mittee. " Recent Developments in the Railroad Work." 

The students of this department attended the following confer- 
ferences and conventions : — 

October 19-22, 1893. — Massachusetts State Convention, at 
Fitchburg. 

January 27, 1894. — Western Massachusetts Conference of 
Junior Departments, at Springfield. 

February 6-8. — New England Secretaries' Conference, at 
Waterbury, Conn. 



For Correspondence Course, see pages 36-38. 
For Text- Books and Prices, see page 39. 



26 



Educational Department. 

* 



Object : Training for the general supervision of the educational 
work and the special duties of Educational Directors. 

Ideal : Training for life rather than for selfish culture. 

The Need : An opportunity to combine industrial, mental, moral 
and spiritual education to peculiar advantage. 

We recognize that the best results in this department can be 
secured only by actual contact with practical operations. 

The work in this department comprises a knowledge of and 
training in the use of the following : 

1. Reading Room. 

2. Library. 

3. Literary Society. 

4. Lectures and Practical Talks. 

5. Educational Classes. a. Commercial. b. Sociological. 
c. Industrial. d. Scientific. e. Language, f Mis- 
cellaneous. 

1. Reading Room: Equipment, supervision, papers and periodicals, 
how secured, technical and scientific material for special classes 
of men. 

2. Library : Growth of Association libraries, technical, reference 
and circulating departments, classification and cataloguing, 
records, librarian, arrangement, selecting and buying books, 
ways and means, judicious advertising. 

3. Literary Society, Congress, Etc. : Value, organization and 

supervision. 

4. Lectures, Practical Talks, Etc. : Their use and abuse. 

Home talent. 

The course in this special department work will embrace in 
general the following : 

5. Educational Classes : Need and possibilities, equipment and 
rooms. Growth, committees, adaptation, thoroughness, instruct- 
ors, examinations, etc. 

(1.) Class room work in such subjects as in the judgment 
of the faculty may seem wise ; as mathematics, book-keep- 



27 



ing, business law, stenography and type writing, political 
economy, drawing and applied design, physics, chemistry, 
power generators (special attention being given to applied 
electricity and all forms of laboratory work), English, 
French, German, Spanish and music. 

(2.) A special course in the history and philosophy of educa. 
tion and the history of educational work in the Association. 

(3.) Methods. 

(4.) Lectures, quizzes, conversations, etc. 

(5.) Extended courses in the Mechanical laboratory including 
the use of tools, work in wood and metal, the elementary 
principles of the trades and industries, etc. 

As far as equipment and facilities will allow the following is a 
suggestive outline of one of the courses in the 

Industrial Section. 
Tentative Schedule.— First JJear. 

First Term. Physics, Mechanical Laboratory. 

Second Term. Mathematics, Mechanical Laboratory. 

Third Term. Drawing, Physical and Mechanical Laboratory. 

Second year. 

First Term. Higher Mathematics, Drawing and Mechanical 
Laboratory. 

Second Term. Chemistry, History and Philosophy of Educa- 
tion, industrially considered, and Mechanical Laboratory. 

Third Term. Engineering, Chemical and Mechanical Labora- 
tory Work. 



28 



Physical Department. 



Object : — The training of men for the work of the Physical Director. 

In addition to the general outline study of man's nature and 
relationships, given on pages 14 and 19, the students of the Physical 
Department will have amplifications of those studies which they need 
to know in greater detail, and of which the following will be 
suggestive : 

Mechanics of the Body. — Based on Physics and Anatomy. 

Study of the bones, articulations, muscles, muscle insertions, 
leverage ; of the combined action of muscles, and mechanism of bod- 
ily movements, with special application to gymnastics and athletics. 
Demonstration on individuals, of muscular origin, insertion and 
action. 

Physiology of Exercise. 

Careful study of both general and special effects of exercise. 
Relation to circulation, respiration, nutrition, secretion; "wind," 
breathlessness, fatigue, etc., etc. "Training" is considered in this 
connection. 

Physical Examination. — Physical Diagnosis, Loomis. 

Study of the appearances, conditions, defects and deformities 
likely to be met with in the examining room ; method of examining 
the heart, lungs, etc. ; to prepare the student to assume such respon- 
sibilities as may properly rest upon the physical director, and to 
protect those who may come under his charge against unwise exercise 
and habits of life. 

Massage. — Massage as a Mode of Treatment, Murrett. 

General principles as applied to development and training. 
Massage of sprains and strains. Medical massage is not included. 

Gymnastic Therapeutics. 

Underlying principles of the subject rather than the details of 
application. The treatment of spinal curvature, functional derange- 
ments of the heart, neurasthenia, general debility, etc. 

Anthropometry. — Use of anthropometric apparatus. 

Measurements ; how taken, preserved and used. Bodily meas- 
urement charts and their mathematical basis ; the " percentile " 
method of Sir Francis Galton, the "physical height as a unit" 
method of Dr. Hitchcock, the ordinary "average" method. Typical 
versus perfect form. Proper use of anthropometric charts, fallacies 
involved in some of them. Characteristics of different classes of 
gymnasts and athletes. 

Photography. 

Instantaneous photography of athletic work. Stereopticon slides. 
Time pictures of unusual cases in office. Flash light photography. 
Each student will supply his own outfit. 



29 



Literature of Physical Education. 

The following, and other books will be read by the students and 
discussed in the class-room : How to get Strong, Blaikie ; Sound 
Bodies for our Boys and Girls, Blaikie ; Physical Education, Maclaren ; 
Walker's Manly Exercise, "Craven;" Brawn and Brain, Aldridge ; 
Physical Culture for Home and School, Dowd ; Health by Exercise, 
Taylor ; Physical Exercise, Wood; Athletics and Football, Shearman ; 
New Gymnastics for Men, Women and Children, Lewis ; Education, 
Spencer; Indian Club Exercises, Kehoe ; British Sports and Pastimes, 
Trollope; Gymnastics for the Fingers and Wrists, Ward-Jackson ; 
Exercise and Training, their Effect on Health, Lee ; University Oars, 
Morgan; Physical Education, Roth; The Brawnville Papers, Tyler; 
Man, Moral and Physical, Jones ; Swedish Educational Gymnastics, 
Posse; A Manual of Anthropometry, Roberts; Out-door Papers, 
Higginson ; Salzman's Gymnastics for Youth. 

These papers and pamphlets will also be studied : Anthropomet- 
ric Manual, Amherst College, Hitchcock and Seelye ; The Physical 
Proportions of the Typical Man, Sargent ; The Anatomy of the 
Contortionist, Dwight ; Physical Training, Sargent; The Influence 
of Exercise on Health, Richards; The Physical Development of 
Women, Sargent ; Military Drill and Gymnastic Training in Physical 
Culture, Hartwell ; Military Drill on Boys, Sargent ; Physiology of 
Exercise, Hartwell ; Physical Characteristics of the Athlete, Sargent ; 
Hygiene for Baseball Players, LeuJ ; Proceedings of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Physical Education. 

The students will have the use of the Library on Physical Educa- 
tion. This has been built up mostly by the contributions of physical 
directors throughout the country, and is one of the largest and 
best libraries in our language on this subject. It contains nearly 
nine hundred books and pamphlets bearing upon physical education. 
A subject index makes it exceedingly valuable as an aid to study, not 
only in prescribed work, but in broader lines, as the time of the 
student may permit. 

History and Philosophy of Physical Education. — With 
reviews of the following books : Report of Boston Physical Training 
Conference; Systematic Training of the Body, Schaible ; Physical 
Training in American Colleges, Hartwell ; An Hour with Delsarte, 
Morgan; Gymnastic Progression, Enebuske. 

The design of this study is to give the student a clear knowledge 
of the work that has been done along these lines. The fundamental 
principles and aims of each system will be studied. The athletics of 
the Greeks, influence on national life, the "Pentathlon;" German 
gymnastics, life of Jahn, Turnverein, school gymnastics, military 
gymnastics ; gymnastics in Sweden, Ling and his work, Royal 
Gymnastic Institute at Stockholm, Swedish " movement cure;" the 
renaissance of athletics in France, life and work of Delsarte ; English 
athletics ; physical education in America ; history of physical depart- 
ment of the Young Men's Christian Association. 

Reviews and special reading in preparation for graduating 
essays. 



30 



Practice. 



Physical Department students will take the whole of the follow- 
ing course as outlined. Secretarial and Educational Department 
students will take the Hygienic Gymnastics, the Pentathlon, and 
other field work, in addition to the shop work under Mr. Graham. 

Gymnastics. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Hygienic Gymnastics. 

Free-hand and calisthenic drills, of the character best adapted 
to improve the health and build up a strong body ; quick, vigorous, 
safe, and progressive work on the apparatus giving the widest range 
of healthful exercise, as side horse, long horse, parallel bars, end and 
side work, vaulting bar, buck, mats, springboard, etc. Drills capable 
of great modification and extension, while containing the same essen- 
tial elements, will be memorized. 

Games. 

Basket ball and other games of suitable character for Association 
use will receive special attention. 

Marching. 

Adaptation of military and fancy marching to meet the needs of 
the Association, enabling the gymnasium leader to handle his men in 
such a way as to secure good order and esprit du corps in his classes. 

senior year. 

Special attention will be paid to normal work, leading of classes, 
constructing drills, etc. Further work with hand apparatus, and in 
heavy gymnastics. 

Athletics. 

Seven acres of the permanent school grounds are given exclu- 
sively to this purpose, laid out as an Athletic Field, with running 
track, tennis courts, and ball field. Land adjoining, also owned by 
the school, will afford additional opportunity for practice in football, 
basket ball, etc., when the regular grounds are occupied. Especial 
emphasis will be laid on the Pentathlon, or fivefold contest, consisting 
of the ioo-yard dash, running high jump, throwing 12-pound hammer, 
pole vault, and mile run. 



3 1 



Aquatics. 

Unusual facilities for rowing are afforded by the Connecticut 
river. We have three four-oared gigs, two double gigs, one single 
gig, one shell, one sailing canoe, two birch bark canoes, and one St. 
Lawrence skiff. 

Each student will learn to swim in the various styles, and will 
be taught methods for rescuing and restoring the drowning. 

Mechanical Laboratory. 

Practical work of the Educational Department ; see page 28. 

Association Work. 

During the Junior year, all students of this department are 
required to be members of the Armory Hill Branch of the local 
Association, to do regular practical work on one of its standing com- 
mittees; and to attend all stated meetings of the committee to which 
appointed. During the Senior year the same must be done in con- 
nection with the Cejitral Branch. 

They will also be expected during the course to visit the large 
gymnasiums of either Boston or New York, and that of either Harvard, 
Yale or Amherst ; also to attend each year two conventions, one of 
the Young Men's Christian Association and the other of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Physical Education. 



Third Summer Conference. 

It has been decided to hold a third Summer Conference on the 
Physical Department work, the experience of the last two years 
having shown the great profit of such time. The date has been 
fixed from August 31 to Sept. 5, inclusive. All interested in the work 
are invited. The general program will be the same as that for last 
year. The mornings will be given to discussions, the afternoons to 
athletics, aquatics, or gymnastics, the evenings to section meetings or 
recreation. 



For Correspondence Course, see pages 36-38. 
For Text- Books and Prices, see page 39. 



33 



Provisional Schedule of Daily Exercises. 

MONDAY TO FRIDAY INCLUSIVE. 



J uniors. 



HOUR. 


SCHEDULE. 


8 a. m. 


Vocal Music (fall) 

Study of Man (winter and spring) 


10 a. m. 


Association Work (fall and winter) 
Ethics (spring) 


12 m. 


Bible 


3 P- m - 


Physical or Educational Department Work. 


4 p. m. 


Practice 


5 P- m - 


Practice 


Seniors. 


HOUR. 


SCHEDULE. 


8 a. m. 


Physical or Educational Department Work 


io a. m. 


Sociology and Pedagogy (fall and winter) 
Association W r ork (spring) 


1 1 a. m. 


Practice 


12 m. 


Practice 


3 P- m - 


Study of Man 


4 p.m. 


Bible 


This schedule is subject to change. 



All students are expected to attend daily prayers at xo a.m. 

A Junior shall be eligible for promotion only after passing satisfactorily in every branch of the 
first year, and upon recommendation of the department superintendent. 

A Senior shall be eligible for graduation only after passing satisfactorily in every branch of the 
the course, and upon recommendation of the department superintendent. 



33 



Terms of Admission. 



The Association Training School is open only to Christian young 
men, over eighteen years of age, who have already shown ability in 
the direction of the work for which they wish to prepare. Each 
applicant shall be a member in good standing of an Evangelical 
church, and if admitted shall bring a certificate to this effect and 
unite and work with some church of his choice in this city. 

Each applicant for admission shall give evidence of having had 
at least a fair English education. If a graduate of a college or high 
school, he shall, upon entering, show his certificate of graduation ; if 
not, he must, before he can be accepted, pass a preliminary exami- 
nation. Applicants for the Physical Department will also have a 
physical examination. Business experience is very desirable. 

Several weeks are sometimes required in making a thorough 
investigation, hence the desirability of making application as early as 
possible. Only after satisfactory reports are received can any student 
be admitted to the school. The school year begins with the first 
Wednesday in September. Students who enter for one year, or the 
course, will not be admitted after the last of September. In extreme 
cases men will be admitted for a part of a year, but nothing aside 
from the regular work is promised to such. 

It will be greatly to the advantage of all to enter at the beginning 
of the year, and too much emphasis cannot be laid upon the import- 
ance of taking the entire course. 

Each shall give at least one week's notice if for any reason he 
wishes to leave the school before the end of the year. 

Each is received upon probation ; and when it becomes clearly 
evident that the prerequisites for success are wanting, he will no 
longer be retained in the school. 

Each student who has not already done so is urged to read 
carefully, in advance of his coming, "The Student's Manual," by 
Rev. John Todd. 

Kooms. 



Each student lodging in the building will care for his own room, 
which must be kept scrupulously clean. He will be expected to provide 
sheets, pillow and bolster slips, towels and soap. Beds are all single, 
three feet in width; pillows, 18x26 inches; bolsters, 18x36 inches. 
Rooms are liable to weekly inspection. 

34 



Estimate of Expenses. 



For the School year of Forty Weeks. 

The following table is based upon the experience of 1891-94: 

Secretarial Physical 





Depart 


ment. 


Department. 


Table board, 


$100 to 


#125 


$100 to $125 


Furnished room with light and heat, 


40 " 


60 


40 " 60 


Tuition, 


SO " 


5° 


5° " 5° 


Gymnasium suits,* 


8 " 


12 


15 " 4°t 


Washing, 


12 " 


20 


12 " 20 


Text and note books (see page 39), 


12 u 


20 


20 " 35 


Conventions, 




18 


15 " ■ 18 


Membership in local Association, 


2 " 


2 


2 " 2 




$239 to 


$302 


$254 to $3451 



The above estimate covers only the items specified, and 



NOT OTHER NECESSARY INCIDENTALS, WHICH EACH MUST CALCULATE 
FOR HIMSELF. 



The expenses of transients vary from $5 to $7 per week. 

Only forty-four students can be lodged in the present building, 
and rooms are assigned as the students are accepted ; rooms so 
assigned, unless by special engagement, will not be held more than 
one day after the opening of the term. Furnished rooms outside the 
building cost from $1.25 to $2 per week; table board, from $3 to 
$4 per week. 

Tuition is payable promptly on the last Mondays in September 
and January, one-half at each payment. Room rent, on last Monday 
in each month. No reduction of rent will be made to a student who 
engages a room and fails to appear at the specified time, nor to one 
who vacates his room less than a month before the close of the 
school. Rent stops only when the room is vacated and the key 
delivered to the janitor. A deposit of twenty-five cents will be 
required for each key to the entrance of the gymnasium. 

Students will save themselves trouble and expense by bringing 
exchange on New York and Boston banks rather than local checks. 



♦Students are advised not to purchase gymnasium or athletic suits before coming to the school 
as the school has regulation colors and suits which all are expected to wear. 

\Gymnasium. — Long-sleeved jersey, $3.00 ; pants, #3. 00; belt, 50 cents; shoes, $2.50. Field. — 
Football suit (including shoes) $8.00; sleeveless jersey, $2.50 ; sweater, #3.50; spiked shoes, #4.50; 
tennis shoes, $2.50; running pants, 75c; hat, 50c. Many of these need to be purchased but once. 

$To this should be added, in the Senior year, from $30 upwards for photography and 
sphygmography. 



35 



Correspondence Courses. 



Secretarial Department. 

This is a provision in response to a deeply felt and widely 
expressed need for extending as far as possible the advantages of 
the Secretarial Department. Many have had only a partial training 
for the secretaryship, some none at all, and still others, though 
recognizing their lack and desirous of more thorough preparation, 
have been unable for various causes to obtain it. 

The Correspondence Course includes the whole of Association 
Work as outlined on pages 20-24 (excepting gymnastics and 
athletics), and not the General Biblical Course outlined on pages 
12, 13, and personal contact with both instructors and fellow students 
is necessarily forfeited ; yet, while thus limited, it is possible through 
intelligent direction to obtain much better results than could be 
expected from unaided individual effort. The instructors are the 
same as in the regular department course. 

The outline consists of two parts. The first embraces the 
"Field, Objects and History" of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, and "The Organization and its Home" (see pages 20-21). 
The second part includes " Methods of Work," and "General Super- 
vision and Extension" (see pages 22-24). "The Hand Book of 
Young Men's Christian Associations" — Edition of 1892, is used as a 
text-book. By close application of at least one hour a day the course 
may be covered in one year. 

The method of study, based upon the same general plans as have 
been used by the Chautauqua College during the past with so much 
success, embraces written questions, answers, outlines, suggestions, 
collateral reading and study, papers, reviews, and examinations. 
Reviews are required at the completion of the first and second parts 
of the course, and a certificate will be given to those passing 70 per 
cent, in an examination upon the whole. 

This method admits of the practical application of lessons 
studied, cultivates the art of composition, promotes clear thinking 
and exactness of expression, and develops habits of reading and 
study. Specimen lesson leaves will be mailed upon application. 

Admission. — The Correspondence Course is designed for Gen- 
eral Secretaries and Assistants. Others who are specially fitted may 
take the course if approved by the instructors. Students are re- 
ceived at any time. 



36 



Fees. — An enrollment fee of $5 is required when the student is 
admitted. The tuition fee is $20 for the course; one-half payable 
when the studies are begun, the other half at the beginning of the 
second part of the course. The expense of text-book and postage on 
correspondence will not exceed $5. 

Postage. — Students must enclose stamps each time of writing, 
sufficient for return postage. 

For list of Correspondence Students see page 8. 



Physical Department. 

This course is intended to require about a year, studying not 
over an hour a day. It will be found useful for men who have been 
led into the conduct of physical work without much study of the 
underlying subjects, and for leaders who have some thought of enter- 
ing the work, or who wish to fit themselves for better service in 
behalf of their fellows even while in the ranks of the volunteer 
workers. 

The following are some of the subjects to be treated : 

The organization and conduct of the physical department of the 
Association ; 

Physical Measurements, and how to take them ; 

Anthropometry, its simpler principles, and how to use measure- 
ments and charts ; 

Anatomy; study of the bones and muscles, and of the actions of 
muscles by groups ; 

Physiology ; a good outline which can be amplified, if desired, 
by further study of a larger work by the same author. 

Hygiene, study of laws of health ; emphasized in connection 
with appropriate chapters in Physiology. 

Personal Purity, from the physiological standpoint ; 

Prescription of Exercise for common defects, weaknesses, and 
derangements ; 

Exercises : suggestive calisthenic drills, and " Series " on 
apparatus. 

Questions will accompany each subject, by the use of which the 
student may test his knowledge of what he is going over day by day, 
and a final test will be given on each subject on its completion. It 
will be found an aid to memory to write answers to the questions 
given, but this is not required, except in prescribed tests and final 
examinations. 

Emphasis will be laid upon those things which have most direct 
bearing upon our work. 

Questions on any obscure points, arising in the study of any 
subject, will be gladly answered to the best of our ability, as it is the 



37 



desire that this course shalHbe as helpful as we can make it to men 
seeking better equipment for their work. 

Fees. — An enrollment fee of $5.00 is required when the student 
is admitted. The tuition fee is $20 for the course ; one-half payable 
when the studies are begun, the other half at the beginning of the 
second part of the course. This does not include text-books. 

Postage. — Students must enclose stamps each time of writing, 
sufficient for return postage. 

Active membership in the Association, and a fair common 
school education are requisite for admission to this course. Students 
will be accepted, to begin study Oct. r, '94. 

The course may be taken as rapidly or as slowly as each indi- 
vidual student may desire. 

The School also furnishes a fuller correspondence course, for 
those wishing to take the subjects in greater detail. Information 
concerning these courses will be furnished on application to A. T. 
Halsted, M.D., Springfield, Mass. 



38 



Text-Books. 



Note. — The first column gives the special prices at which the books are offered to our students 
in Springfield; if ordered by mail or express, transportation will be extra. The second column gives 
the regular list prices. It will be necessary to allow a liberal margin above this estimate, for books not 
now determined upon. 



List No. 1. 



Common to students of both departments. 

Special. List. 

Robinson, English Harmony of the Gospels, $ l -3S $ 1 -S° 

Handbook of Young Men's Christian Associations 

Edition of 1892, (about) 2.00 

Hopkins, Outline Study of Man, 1.55 1.75 

" Law of Love and Love as a Law, 1.55 1.75 

Morton, Handbook of First Aid, .25* .25 

Roberts, Rules of Order, .55 .75 

Yeo, Manual of Physiology, 2.70 3.00 

" Manual of Physical Measurements, .68 .75 

Trumbull, Teachers and Teaching, (about) .84 1.00 

In addition to this list, the Secretarial Department students will 
use the publications of the Int. Com. of Y. M. C. A's, N. Y., $1.25. 



List No. 2. 

In addition to List No. i, the Physical Department students 
will use the following: 

Gould, Medical Dictionary, $3.00 $3-25 

Gray, Anatomy, 5.40 6.00 

Foster, Text Book of Physiology, American edition, 4.05 4.50 

(Four vol. edition may be preferred), 8.10 9.00 

Acton, Reproductive Organs, 1.80 2.00 

Gymnastics, .90 1.00 

Loomis, Physical Diagnosis, 2.70 3.00 

Murrell, Massage as a Mode of Treatment, 1.35 1.50 

Schaible, Systematic Training of the Body, 1.50 2.00 



*No discount from list prices. 



39 



Contributions. 



Inquiries concerning the finances will receive immediate atten- 
tion if addressed to Oliver C. Morse, Secretary International 
Y. M. C. A. Training School, Springfield, Mass., and remittances 
may be made payable to his order. 



Form of Bequest. 

I give and bequeath to the International Young Men's Christian 
Association Training School, Springfield, Mass., the sum ot 
dollars.* 



Bequest for Endowment 

I give and bequeath to the International Young Men's Christian 
Association Training School, Springfield, Massachusetts, the sum 
of , to be safely invested by them and called 

the Fund. The interest of this fund to be 

applied to the use of the School.* 



Perpetual Loan Fund. 

For the purpose of founding a perpetual loan fund in the Inter- 
national Young Men's Christian Association Training School, 
Springfield, Mass. (or either of of its departments, if so stated), 
I hereby give the sum of five thousand dollars — or its equivalent 
in good securities at cash value — to be safely invested by them, the 
income to be loaned toward the education of students who have 
already shown ability in the school. 



*Or the testator may specify, towards the current expenses ; or towards the support of a chair 
of instruction in the general course, or in either of the departments ; or to be used as a loan toward 
the education of students who have shown ability in either departments. 



For General Information 



Concerning the school or its finances, apply to 

Oliver C. Morse, Secretary Int. Y. M. C. A. Training School, 
Springfield, Mass. 



For Special Information 

Concerning the Departments or admission to the School, address : 
J. T. Bowne, Supt. Secretarial Department, 35 Clarendon St. 
Luther Gulick, M.D., Supt. Physical Dept., 153 Westminster St. 
Springfield, Mass. 



So ?4<tf 
19-^2/9^, 



INTERNATIONAL 
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
TRAINING SCHOOL, 
SPRINGFIELD, MASS., U. S. A. 



EIGHTH CATALOGUE, 
i 892-9 j. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

•Admission, Terms of— Regular Courses 33 

" " Correspondence Courses, 36, 37 

Bequest, Forms For, Inside back ewer 

Calendar, 3 

Contributions, How Made, etc., Inside back cover 

Corporation, 4 

Correspondence Course— Secretarial Department, .... 35, 36 
•Physical " ...... 36, 37 

Design, 2 

Expenses, Estimate of— Regular Courses, 34 

" " Correspondence Courses, .... 36, 37 

General Course of Instruction, 12-17 

Graduation, Conditions of, . . 32 

Information, How to Get It, Outside back cover 

Instructors, 11 

Officers, 5 

Physical Department— Department Course, 25-29 

" " Correspondence Course, 36, 37 

Promotions, Conditions of, 32 

Rooms and Bedding, 33 

Schedule of Class Work, 32 

Secretarial Department— Department Course, 18-22 

" " Special Lectures, 23 

" " Correspondence Course, .... 35, 36 

Students— Regular Session, 1892-1893, 6, 8 

" Correspondence, 9, 10 

Tuition (see Expenses above). 



1892-3. 



EIGHTH CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
TRAINING SCHOOL, 

SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS. 




WITH PROSPECTUS FOR 1893-4. 



MAY, 1893. 



PRESS OF CLARK W. BRYAN COMPANY. 

1893. 



THE DESIGN OF THE SCHOOL: 

To train young men as Secretaries, Physical Directors, or other 
officers of Young Men' s Christian Associations. 



CALENDAR. 



Commencement Exercises and Annual Meeting- of the Corpora- 
tion and Board of Trustees, Wednesday, June 21, 1893. 

Quarterly Meetings of the Trustees on the third Wednesdays of 
March, September, and December. 

Regular Meeting of the Instructors on the second Wednesday of 
each month. 



Summer Conference on Physical Work, August 30 to September 5. 



NINTH REGULAR SCHOOL YEAR, 1893-4. 

Special Notice. — The year for the Physical Department Seniors 
will commence on Wednesday, August 30th. See page 25. 

■p. Ttttjtvt 5 Begins Wednesday afternoon, September 13, 1893. 
ierm | Ends Wednesday evening, December 20, 1893. 

WINTER VACATION. 

Winter Term I Begins Wednesday morning, January 3, 1894. 
Winter ierm-j £nds Friday evening, March 23, 1894. 

SPRING VACATION. 

( Begins Tuesday morning, April 3, 1894. 
Spring Term < Commencement Exercises, Wednesday evening, 
( June 20, 1894. 



CORRESPONDENCE COURSES. 
Students may engage in the Correspondence Courses at anytime. 



The Calendar is subject to change. 



3 



CORPORATION. 



The names of Trustees are italicized. 



Australia, N. S. W., Syduey, David Walker. 

" Vict , Melbourne, H. A. Wilcox. 
France, Paris, E. Buscarlet. 
Germany, Berlin, Count Andreas Bernstorff. 
Gt Br., England, London, M. H. Hodder. 

W. H. Mills. 
" Ireland, Belfast, Robert McCann. 
" Scotland, Glasgow, W. M. Oatts. 

Portobello. R. H. Smith. 
India, Madras, W. Rierson Arbuthnot. 

" David McConaughy, Jr. 
Japan, Tokyo, John T. Swift. 
Sweden, Carlskrona, Baron Edward Barnekow. 
Switzerland, Geneva, Rev. Gustave Tophel. 
British Columbia, Victoria, F. W. Teague. 
Manitoba, Winnipeg, C. M. Cope^nd. 

R. J. Whitla. 
Nova Scotia, Halifax, E. W. Gorton. 
Ontario, Hamilton, F. M Pratt. 
" Toronto, Thos. S. Cole. 
" " Robert Kilgour. 

Quebec, Montreal, D. A. Budge. 

D. W. Ross 
" " F. W. Kelley. 

Ala., Birmingham, Joseph Hardie. 
Ark , Little Rock, Col. Logan H. Roots. 
Cal., San Francisco, H. J. McCoy. _ 
Colo., Denver, Alfred W. Chamberlin. 
" " H. B. Chamberlin. 
" " Donald Fletcher. 
Conn., Bridgeport, W. E. Colley. 
" Southport, Elbert B Munroe. 
" Stamford, C. L. Reid 
Ga., Atlanta, W. Woods White. 
111., Chicago, /. E. Brown. 
Ind , Richmond, Albert G. Shepard. 
Ia., DesMoines, W. A. Magee. 
" " E. D. Sampson. 

Kan.. Topeka, R. B. Gemmeil. 
Ky., Louisville, J. L. Wheat 
Me., Portland, T. E. McDonald. 
Md.. Baltimore, W. H. Morriss. 
Mass., Boston, R. M. Armstrong. 
" " J. W Cook. 
" " Jas. L. Gordon. 

" " Chas. A . Hopkins. 

" " H. M. Moore. 
" Cambridge, O. H. Durrell. 
" Campello, Preston B Keith. 
" Fitchburg, Frederick Fosdick. 
" Manchester, Russell Sturgis. 

Springfield, Dr. W F. Andrews. 
" Chas. H . Barrows. 

" H H. Bowman. 

*' J T Bowne. 

" Geo. D. Chamberlain. 

" E. Porter Dyer. 

Luther Gubck, M. D. 
" " Chas Jacobus. 

" " Henry S. Lee. 

11 Arthur G. Merriam. 

" " Oliver C. Morse. 

" Rev. David Allen Reed. 

" " C H. Southworth. 

Mass , Worcester. William Woodward. 
Mich., Detroit, H. G. Van Tuyl. 



Minn., Minneapolis', C. E Dyer. 

John H. Elliott. 
" St. Paul, Thomas Cochran. 

T. A. Hildreth. 
Mo., Kansas City, Witten McDonald. 
" St. Louis, Geo. T. Coxhead. 

'* Frank L. Johnston. 
" " Thos. S. McPheeters. 
Neb., Omaha, J. C. Denise, M. D. 
" Yutan, Robert Weidensall. 
N. H., Concord, Allen Folger. 
" " E. A. Lawrence. 

N. J., Newark, Aaron Carter, Jr. 

*' Elkanah Drake. 
" New Brunswick, Frank L.Janeway. 
" (.orange. D. F. More. 
" Piainfielci, W D. Murray. 
" Summit, Chas. B. Grant. 
N. V., Addison, Burton G. Winton. 
" Brooklyn. F. B Schenck. 
" Buffalo, S. M. Clement. 

" John B. Squire. 
" Medina, W. A. Bowen. 
" New York, Cephas Brainerd. 
" " Thomas K. Cree. 

" C. C. Cuyler. 

Cleveland H. Dodge. 
" " Geo. A. Hall. 

" " R. R. McBurney. 

" " Richard C. Morse. 

" " J. Gardner Smith, M. D. 

Erskine Uhl. 
" ' A. J. D. Wedemeyer. 

Benj. C. Wetmore. 
L D. Wishard 
" Troy, L. E. Gurley. 
N. C. Charlotte, L. A. Coulter 
" Davidson College, Prof. H. L. Smith. 
Ohio, Cincinnati, H. P. Lloyd 

H. Thane Miller. 
Ore., Portland, Noel H. Jacks. 
Penn., Berwick, C.H. Zehnder. 
" Erie, C. W. Davenport. 
" Philadelphia, John H Converse. 
" " Thos. Dewitt Cuyler 

" " Rev. Wallace McMullen. 

" Pittsburgh, S. P. Harbison. 
" Scranton, H. M. Boies 
R I., Peace Dale, R. G. Hazard, id. 

" Providence, H. S. Conant. 
S. C, Charleston, A. T. Jamison. 

" Columbia, A. T. Smvthe. 
Tenu., Chattanooga. J. B. Milligan. 

Knoxville, James H. Cowan. 
" Nashville, James Bowron. 
" J. B. O'Bryan. 
Texas, Dallas A. F. Hardie, 

" Fort Worth, Wm. C. Winthrop. 
Vt., Brattleboro. Col. J J. Estey. 
" Burlington, W. J. Van Patten. 
" Montpelier. A. J. Howe. 
" St. Johnsbury, Col. Franklin Fairbanks. 
Va., Richmond, Joseph Bryan. 
Wash., Seattle, E C Kilbourne. 

" Spokane, Walter Hughson. 
Wis., Milwaukee, Geo. J. Rogers. 



4 



OFFICERS. 



President, Vice-President, 
CHAS. H. BARROWS. H. B. CHAMBERLIN. 

Treasurer, Cor. Secretary, 

GEO. D. CHAMBERLAIN. OLIVER C. MORSE. 

Pec. Secretary. 
F. W. MEYER. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: 

R. C. Morse, R. R. McBurney, C. H. Barrows, 

Dr. W. F. Andrews, H. H. Bowman. 

with officers ex officio. 

auditor : 
H. H. Bowman. 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTION : 

Chas. H. Barrows, Henry S. Lee, E. Porter Dyer, 
Geo. D„ Chamberlain. 



THE CONTROL. 

The control of this school is vested in the Trustees, of whom six, 
with the officers ex officio, constitute an Executive Committee. 

The Trustees are chosen by the Corporation, a majority of whom 
are nominated by the International Convention of Young Men's 
Christian Associations. The instructors are appointed by the 
Trustees. 



5 



STUDENTS, 1892-83. 



SECRETARIAL DEPARTMENT. 



SENIORS. 



Archibald, Lyman Walker, 
Barnes, Frank Everts, 
Chase, William Richmond, 
Day, George Edward, 
French, Benjamin Snell, 
Hildner, Ernst Gotthold, 
Mahan, Frank, 
Willcock, Frank, 



Truro, N. S. 
Montpelier, Vt. 
New Bedford, Mass. 
Westrleld, Mass. 
Amsterdam, N. Y. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Memphis, Term. 
Orangeburg, S. C 



JUNIORS. 

Austin, Burton Cyrus, 
Bunting, Albert Edward, 
Davey, Joseph John, 
Fairbanks, William Austin, 
*Hatt, George Clark, 
Hjorth, Wilhelm, 
Horner, Rudolf, 
King, Elisha Alonzo,- 
Lantz, Christian, 
McCleery, William James, 
Ritchie, Mark, 
Rogers, Dwight Leete., 
Sibley, Frank Leroy, 
Stephens, Duncan Calder, 
Triplett, Edward Mason, 
Worth, Elbridge Morseman, 



New York City. 
Ellenville, N. Y. 
New York City. 
Westboro, Mass. 
Fredericton, N. B. 
Copenhagen, Denmark. 
Basel, Switzerland. 
Attleboro, Mass. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Spencerport, N. Y. 
Waltham, Mass. 
New Britain, Conn. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Burlington, Iowa. 
New Bedford, Mass. 



Studied only part of the year. 



7 

PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



SENIORS. 

Bond, Thomas Parsons, 
burkhardt, frederick wllliam, 
Haskell, Claire Ellis, 
McCastline, Robert, 
Rideout, Melvin Bragdon, 
Smith, Harvey Leigh, 



Cassopolis, Mich. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Chelsea, Mass. 
New York City. 
Ottumwa, Iowa. 
Attleboro, Mass. 



special student. 
Loring, Benjamin Tappan, Holyoke, Mass. 



juniors. 

Badger, Jonathan Edmund, 
Ballard, Lyman Ellsworth, 
Bayley, Alfred, 
Black, Jotham, 
Brown, Arthur White, 
Burton, Willis Sylvester, 
Carey, Charles Henry, 
Clarkson, Thomas Carbarns, 
Dietz, Jr., Henry Louis, 
Foster, Jr., Festus Henry, 
Gabler, George Lewis, 
Holman, Frank, 
Kelly, M. D., David Frederic, 
Kinnicutt, William Henry, 
Lutz, John William, 
Martin, Rufus Jonathan, 
McKee, William, 
Morgan, William George, 



Hanover, N. H. 
Providence, R. I. 
Cheshire, Conn. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Yarmouth, N. S. 
Cattaraugus, N. Y. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Coatbridge, Scotland. 
Oakland, Cal. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Oneida, N. Y. 
London, Ont. 
Bellaghy, Ireland. 
New Bedford, Mass. 
Beaver Falls, Pa. 
Port Hastings, N. S. 
PlainviUe, Conn. 
Lockport, N. Y. 



s 



Page, Pjerson Sterling, 

Ross, Maurice, 

*Smith, Frederick W., 

Theis, Emile Charles, 

Wall, Charles Fitzgerald Butler, 

Welzmiller, Jr., Louis, 



Williamsport, Pa. 
Cape Breton, N. S. 
New Bedford, Mass. 
Paris, France. 
Holy Cross, Ireland. 
New York City. 



* Studied only part of the year. 



CORRESPONDENCE STUDENTS, 1892-3. 



SECRETARIAL DEPARTMENT. 



Benton, Arthur L., Gen. Sec. R. R. Branch, 
Chatterson, J. Henry, Assistant Sec, 
Cleveland, Frederick L., General Sec, 
Dowling, John S., General Secretary, 
Downs, Frederick Corson, Asst. Sec, 
Everett, Charles E., General Secretary, 
Fagan, J. Edward, General Secretary, 
Gillison, John Thomas, General Sec, 
Haller, Charles P., General Secretary, 
Hewer, Basil, General Secretary, Stafford 
Rooms, 

Jones, Oliver A., General Secretary, 
Lunger, James Orion, General Secretary, 

Washington Heights Branch, 
Maines, William H., Assistant Secretary, 
McLennan, Alexander C, Gen. Sec, 
Megginson, W. S., Assistant Secretary, 
Monroe, Edwin D., General Secretary, 
Munger, I. Edwin, General Secretary, 
Pond, Bert Chauncey, Assistant Secretary, 
Porter, Christopher C, General Sec, 
Smith, Harry Boydston, Assistant Secre- 
tary, Greenpoint, 
Stafford, Abel J., General Secretary, 
Sterner, G. B., McClellan, Assistant Sec- 
retary Armory Hill Branch, 
Tainter, Anson L., Assistant Secretary, 
Tenney, Walter L., Asst. Sec Bedford Br., 
Wilmerton, Willtam Nyce, Gen. Sec, 



Collinwood, Ohio. 
Eau Claire, Wis. 
Petersburg, Va. 
Ticonderoga, N. Y. 
New Haven, Conn. 
SaultSte Marie, Mich. 
Fairport, N. Y. 
Pekin, 111. 

Thompson ville, Conn. 

London, England. 
Hoosick Falls, N. Y. 

New York City. 
Paterson, N. J. 
New Brunswick, N. J. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Waterford, N. Y. 
Muscatine, Iowa. 
Bangor, Me. 
Houston, Texas. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Hancock, Mich. 

Springfield, Mass. 
Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Chester, Pa. 



9 



io 

PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Adams, A. F., National Museum and Na- 
tional Deaf Mute ColLege, 
Benson, A. C, 

Caswell, C. E., Physical Director, 
Cook, E. B., Physical Director, 
Davis, A. B., 

Dodge, H. E., Phys. Dir. N. W. Branch, 
Meylan, G. L., Physical Director, 
Robertson, A., Asst. Sec. and Phys. Dir., 
Rudolph, Walter, 
Sauerbrey, H. S., 

Skarstrom, William, Gymnastic Instructor, 

Pratt Institute, 
Wilder, E. W., Physical Director, 



Washington, D. C. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Wichita, Kan. 
Poughkeepsie, N. 
Fitchburg, Mass. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Bangor, Me. 
Zanesville, Ohio. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Owatonna, Minn. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Worcester Mass. 



INSTRUCTORS. 



GENERAL COURSE: 
O. C. Morse, 219 Florida Street, 

Christian Evidences and Outlines of Fundamental Truths of the Bible. 
James Naismith, A.B., 92 Buckingham Street, 

Study of the Bible by Books, Outline Study of Man, Ethics, 
Methods of Christian Work — Senior Year. 
Rev. T. H. Hawks, D.D., 626 Worthington Street, 

Bible History, Exegesis, and Church History. 
R. A. Clark, A.B., M.D., 786 State Street, 

Compositio?i, Rhetoric, Vocal Music, 
Abridged Physical Department Course. 
Rev. Hanford M. Burr, 159 Princeton Street, 

Christian Sociology. 



SECRETARIAL DEPARTMENT: 
J. T. Bowne, Supt. of Dept., 35 Clarendon Street, 

Regular and Abridged Secretarial Department Courses. 
• C. F. Powlison, 219 Florida Street, 

Methods of Christian Work — funior Year. 
Department Correspondence Course. 
F. W. Meyer, Gen. Sec, Y. M. C. A., 998 State Street, 

Applied Committee Work. 



PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT : 
Luther Gulick, M.D., Supt. of Dept., 153 Westminster Street, 

History and Philosophy of Physical Exercise, Anthropometry. 
F. N. Seerley, M.D., 33 Pendleton Avenue, 

Animal Mechanics, Physiology and Hygiene. 
A. T. Halsted, Ph.G., M.D., io2c£State Street, 

Physical Examinations, Gymnastic Therapeutics, 
Department Correspondence Course. 



1 1 



THE GENERAL COURSE. 



The General Course of instruction is largely common to the stu- 
dents of both departments.* It covers two years, and includes the 
following- topics : 



Bible History and Exegesis. 

History of Evangelical Chris- 
tianity. 

Christian Evidences. 

Old and New Testament Canon. 

Fundamental Doctrines of the 
Bible. 

Books of the Bible. 



Outline Study of Man. 
Christian Ethics. 
Christian Sociology. 
Practical Methods of Christian 
Work. 

Rules for Deliberative Bodies. 
Composition and Rhetoric. 
Vocal Music. 



BIBLE HISTORY AND EXEGESIS. 

Junior Year. 

Biblical History (O. T.) 

The Life of Christ. 

Biblical Geography and Chronology. 

Senior Year, 

History of the Apostolic Church. 

Biblical Geography and Chronology (Continued). 

History of Evangelical Christianity : An outline presentation of 
its progress down to the present time, prominence being 
given to missions and the development of doctrine. 

New Testament Exegesis: Selections from Gospels and Epistles. 

Old Testament Exegesis : Selections from Psalms and Prophets. 

English Versions. 

Introduction. 

Text-books : Dr. Smith's Old and New Testament Histories (Har- 
per's Student Series), Fisher's History of the Christian Church; 
Robinson's English Harmony of the Gospels. 

EVIDENCES, CANON, DOCTRINES, BOOKS. 

Jimior Year. 

Outline Study of the Evidences of Christianity; The Divine and 
Human Authorship of the Bible, including the Inspiration, Genuine- 

* See Schedule on page 32. Text Books on page 38. 



12 



1 3 



ness and Canonicity of the Scriptures; and the Fundamental Doc- 
rines held in common by evangelical denominations. 

Senior Year. 

Study of the books of the Bible, with special reference to the 
development of the great doctrines. 

OUTLINE STUDY OF MAN. 

Senior Year. 

The method is constructive, dealing with the operations and rela- 
tions of the physical, psychical, and the moral ; and leading up from 
unorganized matter to the complete unity of the triune man by the 
successive application of powers from without. 

Text-book: Dr. Mark Hopkins' Outline Study of Man. 

CHRISTIAN ETHICS. 

Senior Year. 

Covering the duties of man as a free moral agent. 

Text-book: Dr. Mark Hopkins' Law of Love and Love as a Law. 

COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC. 

Compositions, mainly on subjects relating to association work, 
are required once a month throughout the two years. 

Rhetoric is taught during the Junior year. The object of this 
work is to give such a knowledge of English as shall result in the 
formation of correct and helpful habits in the writing of letters, 
papers, reports, etc. Special attention is given to proof reading. 

Students are expected to join and work with one of the literary 
societies of the school. 

Manual: Roberts' Rules of Order. 

Kellogg's "Text-book on Rhetoric." 

VOCAL MUSIC 

Will be taught throughout the Junior year. The course will include : 
The laws of vibration and tones ; the study of the staff, notes and 
scales; singing by note ; singing of church music and male chorus 
music. The object of the course being that all may acquire the 
ability to lead simple music. 

METHODS OF CHRISTIAN WORK, 

Under the following heads, receive special attention throughout both 
years : The Young Men's Meeting and its Methods; How to Study 
and Use the Bible ; How to Deal with Inquirers ? The Workers' 
Training Class. 



14 

A Course in Practical Christian Sociology.* 



"That Gospel, which in its highest unity is Love, is divided into 
<wo parts: the first is Theology, which is an elaboration of the first 
part of Christ's epitome of the Law, 'Thou shalt love the Lord 
thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy sou), and with all thy 
mind, and with all thy strength ; ' the second is Sociology— the 
science of society — which is an elaboration of the second part of 
the epitome of the Law, ' Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.' " 
—Richard T. Ely. 



Object: The object of the course is twofold: 

(1) To acquaint the Association Worker with the nature and 
extent of the social problems of the age, especially such problems 
as will most concern him in his special field of work. 

(2) To suggest the nature and use of those principles and forces 
which may be brought to the solution of these problems. 

The Need: The Department of Practical Christian Sociology is 
the outcome of a necessity and an opportunity. The necessity 
is found in the fact that scientific diagnosis must precede 
successful medication and treatment in the healing of the 
moral and spiritual man, as well as in the healing of the phy- 
sical man. The opportunity is found in the absorbing interest 
in social questions which characterizes the age, and in the 
readiness of the helpful forces of society to be called forth to 
active service. We feel that the opportunity imposes an 
obligation. 

Hence the Department of Practical Christian Sciology, in which 
the student will have the opportunity of studying the social prob- 
lems of the day from a practical, Christian, and, at the same time, 
scientific standpoint. 

Method of Instruction : 

Instruction will be given by lectures, carefully prepared courses 
of reading and class debates, to some of which the entire school 
will be invited. 



* The outline of this course is given at considerable length, inasmuch as ti e subject is a new 
one both to the school and to the public. 



*5 



General Outline of Study.— Senior Year. 

First and Second Terms. 

Introductory: General View. 

Christian Sociology as a science ; its scope and relation to 

kindred sciences. 
The relation of the Christian church to social science and 

social problems. 
The relation of the Young Men's Christian Association to 

the same. 

Christian Sociology in History : Sociology new as a scientific 

study but old as a sympathetic instinct. 
The growth of the sense of social obligation and of what is 

due from man to man, as indicated by the changed and 

changing condition of women, children, slaves, working 

class, paupers and criminals. 
Subjects for class discussion : 

(1) The attitude of the church to slavery. 

(2) The attitude of the church to the working class. 

Some Present-Day Problems of Sociology. 

A. The Wage-Earner. 

(1) The wage-earner in his relation to the employer and capi- 
talist. The actual and ideal relation contrasted. The 
theory and practice of wages, hours of labor and strikes and 
lockouts. 

(a) Source of Wages : Wage fund theory. 

Product theory. 
Henry George's theory. 
George Gunton's theory. 
Relation of wages to strikes. 

(b) Hours of Labor: The length of the ideal working day 
with reference to different kinds of business; its bearing 
on health, happiness, morality, and the progress of Chris- 
tianity. The economic value of shorter hours. 

The Sabbath in relation to the interests of capital and labor. 
Ethical value of rest. History of Sunday labor in Europe. 
A warning. 

Subjects for discussion : 

I. The comparative value, for the purposes of moral and 
spiritual development, of libraries, parks, and museums, 
as compared with worship. 

II. On what principles and precepts does the Christian 
Sabbath depend ? 



1 6 



(c) Strikes and Lockouts : Causes and consequences. Their 
relation to business, good government and social order. 
The Homestead strike studied from the ethical and moral 
standpoint. 

(2) The wage-earner in his relation to his fellows. Trades 
Unions, Labor Leagues and Guilds ; their principles, 
methods, failures, successes, and possibilities. History of 
Labor Movement. 

(3) The wage-earner in his relation to the Christian Church 
and Christian Institutions. 

Study of the situation and the causes. Investigations in 
Massachusetts in 1892. 
Subjects for class discussion : 

I. Why are the workingmen, as a class, not in our churches ? 

II. Why does the Young Men's Christian Association, at 
present, appeal more to the commercial than to the indus- 
trial class? Study of efforts and experiments in that 
direction. 

(4) The true source of hope for the wage-ear?ier. 

A laborer's view, an employer's, an economist's, a Christian's. 

B. The Poor and Criminal Classes. 

(1) The Situation : Pauper and penal statistics. The relation 
of poor wages to pauperism and crime. The causes of 
poverty : Ignorance, incapacity, improvidence, injustice, 
intemperance, misfortune, and wickedness. 

Special study of the Temperance Question and Tenements 
and Tenement House Reform. 
Subject for class discussion : 
Which is the more effective, drunkenness as a cause of 
poverty, or, poverty as a cause of drunkenness ? 

(2) Rescue and Redemptive Work: Methods, agencies, institu- 
tions; City missions; Philanthropic institutions — religious 
and secular; Charitable orders and brotherhoods; the 
Salvation Army ; "Manual and Technical training schools ; 
Reformatories and prisons. 

(3) The function of government 'in relation to the laboring, the 
dependent and destructive classes. Theories : Individu- 
alism, Paternalism, Socialism. 

(4) The relation of Christiafiity to these classes. 

a. Scientific diagnosis, — careful study of the needs. 

b. The application of the fundamental principles of Chris- 
tianity, "Love to God and love to man." Christian 
versus heathen economics. 

c. Biblical Sociology. 



'7 



(5) The relation of the Young Men's Christian Association to 
these classes and their problems. 

a. The young man a problem himself : His needs, temp- 
tations, and possibilities. 

b. The young man faces these problems in their aggra- 
vated form. 

c. The young man stands for the force which, wisely 
directed, will, under the Providence of God, help to 
solve these problems. 



Educational Work. 

(1) Study of work already done in educational lines. 

(2) The Ideal: Training for life, rather than for selfish culture. 

(3) The Need : The justification for the educational work of the 
Association. An opportunity to combine manual, mental, 
moral and spiritual education to peculiar advantage. 

(4) Legitimate Scope and Possibilities : Studies best adapted 
to the purposes of Association work. 

(5) Approved Methods : Examples. 



SECRETARIAL DEPARTMENT. 



Object: Training for the special duties of the General Secre- 
taryship. 



DEPARTMENT COURSE OF STUDY,* 

FIRST DIVISION— The Field, Objects, and History. 

1. The Field and Its Limits: 

(A) The Work— why needed; (B) A Definite Work— for and 
by young men ; (C) The Aim Distinctively Religious; (D) 
Relation to the Church; (E) Relation to Other Religious 
Societies. 

2. Summary of the Objects and Work : 

(A) The Means Employed in Cities; (B) The Means Em- 
ployed in Small Towns. 

3. The Rise and Growth of the Associations : 

(A) Origin of the Present Movement ; (B) Earlier Work for 
Young Men ; (C) Introduction into America and Work 
Prior to the Civil War; (D) Army Work; (E) Resumption 
of Home Work ; (F) Development of the Work ; (G) Loy- 
alty to the Church. 

SECOND DIVISION— The Organization and its Home. 

4. Organization : 

(A) When and How to Organize ; (B) Practical Hints. 

5. The Constitution: 

(A) General Considerations ; (B) A Suggestive Outline. 

6. Branches and Sub- Organizations : 

7. The Management : 

(A) The Directors ; (B) The Officers. 

* This is in addition to the whole of the General Course outlined on pages 12 and 13, and 
covers two years. See also Schedule of Class Work by departments on page 32. 



iS 



*9 



8. Standing Committees : 

(A) Importance, Enlistment and Composition ; (B) How to 
Organize, the Chairman, etc. ; (C) Principles and Methods 
of Construction ; (D) Names and Duties. 

9. Membership : 

(A) Classes of Membership ; (B) How to Secure Members ; 
(C) The Membership Committee ; (D) How to Retain 
Members; (E) Fees, Tickets, Records and Exchange ; (F) 
The Development of Active Members ; (G) The Associate 
Membership and its Relations ; (H) The Members' Meet- 
ing, or Reception. 
10 The General Secretary : 

(A) The Office and Work ; (B) The Qualifications. 

1 1 . The General Secretary — His Relatio?iships : 

(A) To Churches and Pastors; (B) To Officers, Directors 
and Committees; (C) To Other Employes; (D) To the 
Members ; (E) To the Religious Work ; (F) To the Busi- 
ness Community ; (G) To his Fellow Secretaries. 

12. The General Secretary — Personal Hints : 

1, Accepting a Call ; 2, Beginning Work ; 3, Correspondence ; 
4, Prominent Visitors ; 5, System; 6, Memorandum Books; 
7, Statistics; 8, Human Nature; 9, Dress; 10, Conversa- 
tion ; 11, Economy; 12, The Other Sex; 13, Health; 14, 
Growth; 15, Spiritual Life. 

13. Securing and Training Employed Officers: 

(A) Demand and Supply ; (B) Methods of Training. 

14. The Association Home : 

(A) Advantages of Owning a Building ; (B) Location ; (C) 
Arrangement and Construction ; (D) Equipment. 

15. The Care of the Home : 

(A) General Principles; (B) Repairs and Safety; (C) Order 
and Cleanliness. 

16. Ho7v to Get a Building: 

(A) Preparatory Work; (B) Plan of a Canvass; (C) Hints 
and Cautions. 

17. The Building Movement : 

Its Beginning and Growth. 

THIRD DIVISION— Methods of Work* 

18. Current Finances : 

(A) Ways and Means — (1) annual budget, (2) income, (3) 
solicitation ; (B) Collections and Disbursements; (C) Finan- 
cial Bookkeeping. 



* Methods of Work are fully illustrated by approved record blanks and printed matter, and 
wherever possible, practice will be required. 



20 



19. Real Estate and Efidowment Funds : 

(A) Incorporation; (B) Trustees; (C) Endowment; (D) Debt, 
Taxes, Insurance, and Leases. 

20. Records and Public Presentation of the Work : 

(A) Records and Statistics ; (B) Anniversaries ; (C) The Par- 
lor Conference ; (D) Printed Matter— (i) the bulletin, (2) 
annual reports, etc. 

2 1 . The Bible in Association Work : 

(A) Individual Study — objects, methods and helps ; (B) Class 
Study— (1) a Bible class indispensable, (2) relation of the 
general secretary, (3) divisions, beginners, advanced and 
training classes, (4) time, place, and appliances, (5) the 
teacher, (6) the class, (7) the topics, (8) preparing the lesson, 
(9) teaching the lesson, etc. ; (C) Practical Work with the 
Unconverted — (1) personal work, (2) the evangelistic Bible 
class (3) the Bible in the evangelistic meeting; (D) Bible 
readings. 

22. Religious Meetings, etc. : 

(A) The Young Men's Meeting ; (B) Other Meetings at the 
Rooms; (C) Religious Work Outside the Rooms— (1) in 
boarding houses, (2) work in public institutions, (3) sermons 
to young men, (4) distribution of religious reading matter, 
(5) the invitation committee. 

23. The Place and Value of the Secular Agencies. 

24. The Educational Department : 

(A) The Reading Room — furniture, supervision, papers and 
periodicals, how secured ; (B) The Library* — (1) growth of 
Association libraries, (2) reference and lending departments, 
(3) apartments, (4) classification and cataloguing, (5) charg- 
ing, (6) the librarian, (7) order, (8) selecting and buying 
books, (9) ways and means, (10) advertising the library ; (C) 
Educational Classes— (1) the need, (2) growth, (3) the com- 
mittee, (4) adaptation, (5) thoroughness, (6) frequency of 
classes, (7) instructors, classrooms and examinations ; (D) 
Literary Societies — value, how organized and supervised ; 
(E) Lectures and Talks— (1) use and abuse of lectures, (2) 
home talent, (3) practical talks. 

25. The Physical Department : 

(A) Aim of the Department— (1) health, (2) education, (3) 
recreation ; (B) Conditions under which a Physical Depart- 
ment should be started ; (C) Scientific Equipment and 
Methods— (1) examinations, (2) statistics, (3) prescription of 
exercise ; (D) Practical Equipment and Methods — (1) loca- 
tion and arrangement of gymnasium, (2) bath and dressing 

* Arrangements can be made, if desired, for a special course in Association Library Work. 



2 I 



rooms, (3) outfit of gymnasium, (4) methods of gymnastic 
work, (5) out-door work ; (E) The Religious Work ; (F) The 
Physical Director; (G) The Department Committee. (All 
Secretarial students will take the abridged course in Gym- 
nastics and Athletics on page 18.) 

26. The Social Department : 

(A) The Reception Committee ; (B) The Social Rooms ; (C) 
Social Entertainments. 

27. I?iformation and Relief: 

(A) Boarding Houses; (B) The Employment Bureau; (C) 
Savings Bureau and Benefit Fund ; (D) Visiting the Sick ; 
(E) Destitute Young Men. 

28. Work for Boys : 

(A) History; (B) Necessity," Aim and Benefits; (C) Organiza- 
tion ; (D) Different Classes; (E) Methods and Agencies — 
(1) religious, (2) educational, (3) physical, (4) social. 

29. Work for Special Classes : 

(A) College Students — history, methods, outgrowths; (B) 
Railroad Men — (1) history, (2) aims and benefits, (3) organi- 
zation and finance, (4) rooms and methods ; (C) Commercial 
Travelers— the field, work, and agencies ; (D) Other Nation- 
alities — (1) the field, (2) the German work, (3) the Colored 
work, etc.; (E) Miscellaneous Classes — (1) soldiers and 
sailors, (2) deaf mutes, (3) lumbermen, (4) firemen, police- 
men, street car employes, etc. 

30. Women's Work for Young Men: 

Organization and Methods. 

FOURTH DIVISION— General Supervision and Extension. 

31. State and Provincial Work: 

(A) History; (B) The State Committee; (C) Finances; (D) 
The State Secretary; (E) The State Convention— (1) pre- 
paratory work by the state committee, the programme, the 
convention circular, (2) preparatory work by local associa- 
tion, (3) at the convention; (F) The District Work— (1) the 
committee, (2) conferences and visitation, (3) corresponding 
members ; (G) The Relation of Local Associations to the 
General Work. 

32. The Afnerican Internatiofial Work: 

(A) History and Organization ; (B) The Field ; (C) The Work 
— (1) supervision and extension, (2) correspondence, (3) 
publications, (4) securing and training employed officers, 
{5) aid to building enterprises, (6) aid in securing funds, (7) 



22 



aid to state and other conventions, (8) help in disaster, (9) 
secretaries of the committee, (10) international finances, 
(11) international conventions, (12) day and week of prayer. 
33. The World's Alliance: 

History, Organization, and Work. 
Text-book : " Hand-book of the History, Organization and Meth- 
ods of Work of Young Men's Christian Associations — Edition o 
1892." This book was prepared primarily for the use of this school. 

During the entire course the students will have access to the City 
Library of more than 80,000 volumes, to the School Library and to 
the Historical Library of the Young Men's Christian Associations ; 
and will also be required to engage in special courses of reading in 
connection with the department work. 

GYMNASTICS AND ATHLETICS— Abridged Course. 

This course is a part of the regular prescribed work of the Secre- 
tarial Department, and every student therein is expected to engage 
faithfully in it. Its purpose is to give to each a practical knowledge 
of this work, that will enable him intelligently to direct a small 
gymnasium. A sufficient amount of theory will be given to insure 
the intelligent appreciation of the field. 

Each student will receive a physical examination, and work will 
be prescribed that will, as far as possible, put him in the best condi- 
tion for study and future work. 

Theory. — Elementary anatomy, physiology, and hygiene. 

In connection with these subjects will be taken up the philosophy 
of the different gymnastic systems, and the theory of massage. 

First aid to injured. 

Lectures on history of physical education, effect of body on the 
mind, literature of physical education. 
Measurements, how taken and used. 

Purity, scientific basis and methods of work for its advancement. 

Text-books: Martin's Human Body (Briefer Course), Morton's 
Handbook of First Aid. 

Practice.— Calisthenics. Use of developing apparatus. 

Light Gymnastics, including dumb bells, wands, Indian clubs, 
etc. A calisthenic, dumb bell, and bar bell drill will be committed 
to memory. 

Heavy Gymnastics : vaulting, horizontal and parallel bars, horse, 
buck, etc. 

Athletics : walking, running jumping, throwing the hammer, put- 
ting the shot, pole vaulting, base ball, foot ball, lawn tennis. 

Class work especially adapted to the needs of the Young Men's 
Christian Associations, on all of the apparatus, will be committed 
by the students. 



23 



Note.— In a number of instances attempts have been made to have the Assistant Secretary 
conduct the physical department. This is not so desirable as for the General Secretary himself 
to do it, having an assistant to relieve him in the general work of the Association in order that he 
may have the time. Work in the physical department gives the Secretary an opportunity to be- 
come acquainted with the associate membership such as is not afforded by any other department. 
It also involves his taking exercise that is necessary for his own well being, and puts him before 
his membership in a desirable light. The fundamental idea of the Association— that it is an 
association and not a one man affair — should be kept in mind here as in the other departments. 
Much cau be done through the development of leaders, so that where the Secretary is directing 
the gymnasium, he ought after a time to be obliged to conduct only a leader's class, all the other 
classes being led by the men whom he has trained. This is the simple application of the commit- 
tee idea to the physical department. 

DEPARTMENT PRACTICE. 

The Associations of Springfield are consolidated on the metro- 
politan plan. 

The Juniors are required to become members of the Armory Hill 
Branch before October first ; to do. regular practical work on one or 
more of its standing committees; and to attend all stated meetings 
of the committees to which appointed. 

The same is required of the Seniors in connection with the Central 
Branch, unless preparing especially for Railroad work, when they 
will unite with the Railroad Branch. 

All are given practice in preparing monthly reports of commit- 
tees, minutes of meetings, items for newspapers and bulletins, 
printer's copy, and proof reading; and are expected to attend each 
year at least two Association Conventions. The instructors decline 
to grant leave of absence to attend conventions other than those 
prescribed in the Department Course. 

Students will be marked for practice as for any other work of 
the course. 

SPECIAL LECTURES AND CONFERENCES. 

March 22, 1892 — Robinson Souttar, President of Y. M. C. A., 
Oxford, England. "The Decree of Success in Christian Work." 

December 5. — H. P. Anderson, Secretary of International Com- 
mittee. " Condition and Claims of Work in the South." 

January 27, 1893. — George B. Hodge, Secretary of Educational 
Department International Committee. " Possibilities in the Educa- 
tional Department of the Young Men's Christian Association." 

March 7. — A. H. Siegfried, Eastern Agent of the " Chicago 
Daily News," and President of the Montclair (N. J.) Y. M. C. A. 
"The Association and the Newspaper;" and again April 18, on 
" Kinship between the Association and Church." 

March 14. — George A. Warburton, Secretary of Railroad 
Branch, Y. M. C. A., New York City. " Hindrances and Helps to 
Progress in the Christian Life." 



?4 



March 21. — S. C. Roney, Knoxville, Tenn. "Business Methods 
Applied to all Departments of Association Work." 

April 4. — Claus Olandt, Jr., Secretary International Commit- 
tee. " Association Work Among German-speaking Young Men." 

April 5.— E. Porter Dyer, Editor "Springfield Daily Union." 
"The Preparation of an Article for the Press." 



The students of this department attended the following con- 
ferences and conventions : — 

Octobei 20-23, 1892. — Massachusetts State Convention, at 
Pittsfield. 

February 21-22, 1893.— New York State Secretaries' Con- 
ference, at Albany. 

February 23-26. — New York State Convention, at Saratoga 
Springs. 

For Correspondence Course, see pages 35-36. 



For Text-Books and Prices, see page 38. 



PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



MOTTO— E Tribus Unum. 



Object : Training for the special duties of Physical Directors. 



The whole work of this department is founded on a few general 
principles, and all the studies are considered with reference to those 
principles. 

These principles are : 

/. Unity. 

Man is a unit ; body, mind and soul forming one complete 
whole, neither complete without the others. 

II. Law of Symmetry. 

The best results can be secured only when man as a whole 
is symmetrically developed, not merely each nature with 
reference to itself, but each nature in relation to the others. 

III. " Function makes Structure." 

The doing of a thing tends to increase the ability to do that 
thing. Thus, doing all-round exercises, those which 
demand symmetrical bodies, tends to produce symmetry. 



It has been found impossible to put into the present two-years' 
course a sufficient attention to the out-of-door work. Accordingly 
it has been decided for the present year to devote the time from 
August 30 to September 13 in such work with the Senior class. It 
is thus apart of the required work. Attendance during these two 
weeks is at present optional to the junior students. It is a time, 
however, of great importance, and should be observed by all present 
and prospective students. 



2 5 



26 



DEPARTMENT COURSE.— TWO YEARS. 



THEORY. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. 

Animal Mechanics. — Based on physics and anatomy. Elemen- 
tary Physics, Balfour Stewart. Energy, Mechanical Powers, Study 
of the Lever. Gray's Anatomy. Osteology, pp. 220-295. Articu- 
lation, Lectures, Myology, pp. 362-487. Lectures on combined 
action of muscles in gymnastics and athletics. Mechanism of 
bodily movements. Study of relations and insertions of muscles to 
power and speed. Study of individuals as to muscular origin and 
insertion. 

Young Men's Christian Association.— The students in this 
department will be expected to cover during the Junior year an 
abridged course in Young Men's Christian Association work based 
upon the outline of the Secretarial Department, on pages 18-22. 

Second Term. 

Physiology.— Martin's " Human Body." (Large edition.) 
Especial attention will be given to the following : Structure of 
motor organs. Structure of muscle, muscular growth. Causes 
affecting growth. Physiology of muscle. Muscular fatigue and 
exhaustion. Muscular training, stiffness and rest. Local effects 
of exercise on muscle. Effects of massage on muscle. Physiology 
of the nervous system. Effects of the different kinds of exercise 
on the brain, spinal cord, and nerves. Effects of exercise on cir- 
culatory apparatus. " Wind " in training. Alteration of weight 
by exercise. Waste products of exercise. Energy-yielding foods. 
Muscle-building foods. Functions of brain and spinal cord. 
Special lectures on sight and the "subjective functions of the ner- 
vous system " will indicate the nature and method of the modern 
physiological psychology. 

Hygiene. — Considered with physiology in connection with appro- 
priate chapters, with especial reference to the following: Duration 
of life. Causes of disease : heredity, use and abuse of stimulants, 
tobacco, abuses of eating, mental worry, immorality, late hours. 
Food and diet. Cleanliness : baths and bathing. Clothing : ma- 
terial, fashion, pressure. Habitations : ventilation, sanitary appli- 
ances, disinfection, hygiene of employment. 



27 



Training. — Theory of, considered in connection with physi- 
ology. General principles and effects on the body. Dietetics. 
Training for wind, muscle, endurance, speed, habit. Effects of 
each. Training for all-round athletic contest. Training for indi- 
vidual events: sprint running, high jumping, long distance running, 
hammer throwing, putting shot, hurdle running. 

Young Men's Christian Association (Abridged Course).— 
Continued. (See First Term.) 

Third Term. 

Personal Purity. — Physiology of the reproductive organs. 
Effects of violation of the laws of purity ; on the body, on the mind. 
Intellectual licentiousness; cause, effects. Hygienic treatment. 
Quack doctors and their methods. 

First Aid to the Injured. — H'and-book of First Aid, Morton. 
Additional lecture on the treatment of sprains, muscular strains, 
and bruises. The use of bandaging for weak joints, and the treat- 
ment of every-day wounds. 

Physical Department. — a. Fundamental basis and relation to 
other departments, b. Conditions for: demand, gymnasium com- 
mittee, leader, place, c. Methods and equipment : number of 
classes, leaders, and leaders' corps, visitors. Scientific (office) : 
Physical examination, prescription, measurements, personal purity. 
Practical (gymnasium, field) : kinds of exercise, exhibitions, com- 
petitions, d. Religious work : personal, Bible training class, e. 
Physical Director: Qualifications, spiritual, mental, physical; train- 
ing; duties. 

Young Men's Christian Association (Abridged Course). — 
Continued. (See First Term.) 

On account of the great amount of work to be covered in practice, 
it has been found necessary to have the Senior year in the Physical 
Department open two weeks before the regular term. The extra 
time will be spent entirely in athletic and aquatic practice. This 
time is a regular part of the course, and is necessary to graduation. 
Any other students so desiring can avail themselves of this oppor- 
tunity for extra practice. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. 

Physiology of Bodily Exercise, Lagrange. — Physiological 
aspects of training. Wind, stiffness, and other questions of a 
similar nature. Exception is taken to Dr. Lagrange's position on 
the cause of breathlessness, and the relation of the lungs to chest 
expansion. 



28 



Sphygmography. — The use of the sphygmograph in health. 
Each student will supply himself with a Dudgeon sphygmograph. 
The causation of the different elements of the tracings. Work and 
rest of the heart and arteries ; influence of cold, heat, gravity, com- 
pression, tea, coffee, tobacco, and stimulants. Each student will 
prepare in essay form a report of the experiments conducted by 
himself on some problem that shall be given him. The scientific 
or inductive method of study will here receive attention, the design 
being to conduct original scientific investigations by correct princi- 
ples, and also to enable him to recognize correct and incorrect 
inductions. 

Physical Examination.— Physical Diagnosis, Page. Diseases 
and sequelae most frequently met with in the examining room. 
Auscultation, percussion. The use of inspection will be emphasized. 

Massage. — Massage as a mode of treatment, Murrell. General 
principles as applied to development and training. Massage of 
sprains and strains. Medical massage is not included. 

Second Term. 

Gymnastic Therapeutics. — Underlying principles of the sub- 
ject rather than the details of application. The treatment of spinal 
curvature, functional cardiac difficulties, neurasthenia, general 
debility. 

Anthropometry. — Use of anthropometric apparatus. Measure- 
ments; how taken, preserved, and used. Bodily measurement 
charts and their mathematical basis; the "percentile" method of Sir 
Francis Galton, the "physical height as a unit" method of Dr. 
Hitchcock, the ordinary "average" method. Typical versus per- 
fect form. Proper use of anthropometric charts, fallacies involved 
in some of them. Characteristics of different classes of gymnasts 
and athletes. 

Literature of Physical Education. — The following books will 
be read by the students and discussed in the class-room : How to 
get Strong, Blaikie; Sound Bodies for our Boys and Girls, Blaikie; 
Physical Education, Maclaren ; Walker's Manly Exercise, "Craven;" 
Brawn and Brain, Aldridge; Physical Culture for Home and School, 
Doiud; Health by Exercise, Taylor; Physical Exercise, Wood; 
Athletics and Football, Shearman; New Gymnastics for Men, 
Women, and Children, Lewis ; Education, Spencer; Indian Club 
Exercises, Kehoe ; British Sports and Pastimes, Trollop e ; Gymnas- 
tics for the Fingers and Wrists, Ward-Jackson ; Exercise and Train- 
ing, their Effect on Health, Lee; University Oars, Morgan; Phys- 
ical Education, Roth; The Brawnville Papers, Tyler; Man, Moral 



2 9 



and Physical, Jones ; Swedish Educational Gymnastics, Posse; A 
Manual of Anthropometry, Roberts; Out-door Papers, Higgi?ison ; 
Salzman's Gymnastics for Youth. 

These papers and pamphlets will also be studied : Anthropome- 
tric Manual, Amherst College, Hitchcock and See/ye; The Physical 
Proportions of the Typical Man, Sargent; The Anatomy of the 
Contortionist, Dzvight ; Physical Training - , Sargent ; The Influence 
of Exercise on Health, Richards ; The Physical Development of 
Women, Sargent ; Military Drill and Gymnastic Training in Physical 
Culture, Hartwell; Military Drill on Boys, Sargent; Physiology of 
Exercise, Hartwell; Physical Characteristics of the x^thlete, Sargent; 
Hygiene for Baseball Players, Leicf ; Proceedings of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Physical Education. 

The students will have the use of the Library on Physical Educa- 
tion. This has been built up mostly by the contributions of physical 
directors throughout the country, and is one of the largest and best 
libraries in our language on this subject. It contains upwards of 
three hundred volumes and nearly as many pamphlets, some of 
which are rare and valuable, besides files and current numbers of 
magazines. A subject index of the whole will render available what 
has not hitherto been of service. 

Third Term. 

Photography. — Instantaneous photography of athletic work. 
Stereopticon slides. Time pictures of unusual cases in office. 
Flash light photography. Each student will supply his own outfit. 

History and Philosophy of Physical Education.— With re- 
views of the following boohs : Report of Boston Physical Training 
Conference; Systematic Training of the Body, Schaible ; Physical 
Training in American Colleges, Hartwell ; An Hour with Delsarte, 
Morgan; Gymnastic Progression, Enebuske. 

The design of this study is to give the student a clear knowledge 
of the work that has been done along these lines. The fundamental 
principles and aims of each system will be studied. The athletics of 
the Greeks, influence on national life, the "Pentathlon; " German 
gymnastics, life of Jahn, Turnverein, school gymnastics, military 
gymnastics; gymnastics in Sweden, Ling and his work, Royal 
Gymnastic Institute at Stockholm, Swedish " movement cure ; " the 
renaissance of athletics in France, life and work of Delsarte ; 
English athletics ; physical education in America; history of physi- 
cal department of the Young Men's Christian Association. 

Reviews and special reading in preparation for graduating essays. 



3° 

PRACTICE. 

The method of instruction in gymnastics and athletics is analytic 
and synthetic. It is called analytic because each exercise is ana- 
lyzed into the elementary movements of which it is composed. It 
is synthetic because after learning these elementary movements, 
they are gradually combined to form the exercise first shown. The 
student is thus led both to a thorough appreciation and comprehen- 
sion of the exercise as a whole, and to its intelligent performance. 

Although it is desired to give the student as wide a range of prac- 
tice as possible, still it is deemed unwise to attempt any work of a 
hazardous nature. 

Special attention will be given to the building up of the weak 
parts of the student, and the development of a strong, erect, sym- 
metrical, and graceful figure. Two hours a day will be given to 
practice throughout both years. 

Gymnastics.— Junior Year. Calisthenics. Use of Developing 
Apparatus : Chest weight, floor and overhead pulleys, etc. Light 
Gymnastics, Elementary: Dumb bells, Indian clubs, wands. Heavy 
Gymnastics, Elementary : Vaulting bar, horizontal bar, parallel 
bars, horse, buck. Special reference will be paid to gymnastic 
games. 

Senior Year. Sparring; Wrestling; Normal work, leading of 
classes, etc. Light Gymnastics : Dumb bells, Indian clubs, wands. 
Heavy Gymnastics : Vaulting bar, horizontal bar, parallel bars, 
horse, buck. 

Pedagogy. — Attention will be given to the art of teaching. Each 
student will be given practice in the actual leading of classes. 

Invention of Exercises.— Especial attention will be given to 
the construction of gymnastic drills to meet especial cases and 
classes. Each student will be required to prepare and submit such 
drills to the instructors. 

Athletics. — Seven acres of the permanent school grounds are 
given exclusively to this purpose, laid out as an Athletic Field, with 
running track, tennis courts, and ball field. Land adjoining, also 
owned by the school, will afford additional opportunity for practice 
in football, basket ball, etc., when the regular grounds are occu- 
pied. Especial emphasis will be laid on the Pentathlon, or five- 
fold contest, consisting of the ioo-yard dash, running high jump, 
throwing 12-pound hammer, pole vault, and mile run. 

Aquatics. — Unusual facilities for rowing are afforded by the Con- 
necticut river. We have three four-oared gigs, two double gigs, one 
single gig, one shell, one sailing canoe, two birch bark canoes, and 
•one St. Lawrence skiff. 

Each student will learn to swim in the various styles, and will be 
taught methods for rescuing and restoring the drowning. 



3i 



During the Junior year, all students of this department are re- 
quired to be members of the Armory Hill Branch of the local 
Association, to do regular practical work on one of its standing 
committees; and to attend all stated meetings of the committee to 
which appointed. During the Senior year the same must be done 
in connection with the Central Branch. 

They will also be expected during the course to visit the large 
gymnasiums of either Boston or New York, and that of either Har- 
vard, Yale or Amherst; also to attend each year two conventions, 
one of the Young Men's Christian Association and the other of the 
American Association for the Advancement of Physical Education. 

Of the General course on pages 12, 13, the students in this depart- 
ment take Systematic Bible Truth, Exegesis, Methods of Christian 
Work, Outline Study of Man, and Ethics, omitting Vocal Music, 
Rhetoric, Bible History, and Church History. 

See schedule of Class Room Work on page 32. 



Second Summer Conference. 

It has been decided to hold a second Summer Conference on the 
Physical Department work, the experience of last year having 
shown the great profit of such time. The date has been fixed from 
August 30 to September 5. All interested in the work are invited. 
The general program will be the same as that for last year. The 
mornings will be given to discussions, the afternoons to athletics, 
aquatics, or gymnastics, the evenings to section meetings or recrea- 
tion. A general outline of work designed particularly for the 
Young Men's Christian Association will be presented for discus- 
sion, criticism, and ultimate publication. 



For Correspondence Course, see pages 36 and 37. 



For Text-Books and Prices, see page 38. 



3? 



DAILY ORDER OF EXERCISES 

By Departments, 
Monday to Friday, Inclusive. 



juniors. 





Secretarial. 




Physical. 


8.00 a. m. 


Systematic Bible Truth (3). 
Vocal Music (2). 


8.00 a. m. 


Systematic Bible Truth (3). 
Abridged Secretarial Department 
Work (2). 


g.oo a. m. 




9.00 a. m 


Department Theory. 


10.00 a. m. 


Department Work (Fall). 
Abridged Physical Departm't Work 
(Winter and Spring). 


10.00 a. m. 


Exercise. 


11.00 a. m. 




11.00 a. m. 


Exercise. 


12.00 m. 




12.00 m. 




3.00 p. m. 




3.00 p. m. 




4.00 p. m. 


Bible History (3). Rhetoric (2). 


4.00 p. m. 




5 .00 p. m. 


Exercise. 


5.00 p. m. 




SENIORS. 




Secretarial. 




Physical. 


8.00 a. m. 




8.00 a. m. 


Department Theory. 


9.00 a. m. 


Systematic Bible Truth, Ethics, or 
Outline Study of Man. 


9.00 a. m. 


Systematic Bible Truth, Ethics, or 
Outline Study of Man. 


10.00 a. m. 


Dep't Work (Winter and Spring). 
Christian Sociology (5). 


10.00 a. m. 


Christian Sociology (Fall) (5). 


11.00 a. m. 




11.00 a. m. 


Exercise. 


12.00 m. 




12.00 m. 


Exercise. 


3.00 p. m. 


Church History (Fall) (5). 
Exegesis (Winter and Spring) (5). 


3.00 p. m. 


Exegesis (Winter and Spring) (5). 


4.00 p. m 


Exercise. 


4.00 p. m. 




S.oop. m. 

1 




5.00 p. m. 





The figures after the names of the studies refer to the number of hours per week given to 
that subject. 

All students are expected to attend daily prayers at 10 a. m., and to furnish original compositions 
once a month. 

A Junior shall be eligible for promotion only after passing satisfactorily in every branch of the 
first year, and upon recommendation of the department superintendent. 

A Senior shall be eligible for graduation only after passing satisfactorily in every branch of the 
course, and upon recommendation of the department superintendent. 



33 



TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

The Association Training School is open only to Christian young 
men, over eighteen years of age, who have already shown ability in 
the direction of the work for which they wish to prepare. Each 
applicant shall be a member in good standing of an Evangelical 
church, and if admitted shall bring a certificate to this effect and 
unite and work with some church of his choice in this city. 

Each applicant for admission shall give evidence of having had 
at least a fair English education. If a graduate of a college or high 
school, he shall, upon entering, show his certificate of graduation ; 
if not, he must, before he can be accepted, pass a preliminary 
examination. Applicants for the Physical Department will also 
have a physical examination. Business experience is very desirable. 

Several weeks are sometimes required in making a thorough in- 
vestigation, hence the desirability of making application as early as 
possible. Only after satisfactory reports are received can any 
student be admitted to the school. The school year begins with 
the first Wednesday in September. Students who enter for one 
year, or the course, will not be admitted after the last of September. 
In extreme cases men will be admitted for a part of a year, but 
nothing aside from the regular work is promised to such. 

It will be greatly to the advantage of all to enter at the beginning 
of the year, and too much emphasis cannot be laid upon the im- 
portance of taking the e?itire course. 

Each shall give at least one week's notice if for any reason he 
wishes to leave the school before the end of the year. 

Each is received upon probation ; and when it becomes clearly 
evident that the prerequisites for success are wanting, he will no 
longer be retained in the school. 

Each student who has not already done so is urged to read care- 
fully, in advance of his coming, "The Student's Manual," by Rev. 
John Todd. 



ROOMS. 

Each student lodging in the building will care for his own room, 
which must be kept scrupulously clean. He will be expected to pro- 
vide sheets, pillow and bolster slips, towels, and soap. Beds are all 
single, three feet in width ; pillows, 18x26 inches ; bolsters, 18x36 
inches. Rooms are liable to weekly inspection. 



34 



ESTIMATE OF EXPENSES 



FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR OF FORTY WEEKS. 



The following table is based upon the experience of 


1891-92 : 




Secretarial 


Physical 




Departm 


ent. 


Department. 


Table board, 


$100 to : 




$100 to $150 


burnished room with light and heat, 


40 " 


55 


40 " 55 


Tuition, 


50 " 


50 


50 " 50 


Gymnasium suits,* 


8 " 


12 


15 " 4o| 


Washing, 


12 " 


20 


12 " 20 


Text and note books (see page 35), 


12 " 


20 


20 " 35 


Conventions, 


15 " 


18 


15 " 18 


Membership in local Association, 


2 " 


2 


2 " 2 




$239 to $327 


$254 to $370$ 


The above estimate covers only 


THE ITEMS SPECIFIED, AND 


NOT OTHER NECESSARY INCIDENTALS, 


WHICH 


EACH 


MUST CALCU- 



LATE FOR HIMSELF. 



The expenses of transients vary from $5.00 to $7.00 per week. 

Only forty-four students can be lodged in the present building, 
and rooms are assigned as the students are accepted ; rooms so 
assigned, unless by special engagement, will not be held more than 
one day after the opening of the term. Furnished rooms outside 
the building cost from $1.25 to $2,00 per week; table board, from 
$3.00 to $4.00 per week. 

Tuition is payable promptly on the last Mondays in September 
and January, one-half at each payment. Room rent, on last Mon- 
day in each month. No reduction of rent will be made to a student 
who engages a room and fails to appear at the specified time, nor to 
one who vacates his room less than a month before the close of the 
school. Rent stops only when the room is vacated and the key de- 
livered to the janitor. A deposit of twenty-five cents will be 
required for each key to the entrance of the gymnasium. 

Students will save themselves trouble and expense by bringing 
exchange on New York and Boston banks rather than local checks. 

* Students are advised not to purchase gymnasium or athletic suits before coming to the school, 
as the school has regulation colors and suits which all are expected to wear. 

t Gymnasium. — Long-sleeved jersey, #3.00; pants, $3.00; belt, 50c; shoes, 2.50. Field — 
Football suit (including shoes), $8. 00; sleeveless jersey, $2.50; sweater, $3.50; spiked shoes, 
$4.50; tenuis shoes, $2.50; running pants, 75c ; hat, 50c. Many of these need to be purchased 
but once. 

X To this should be added, in the Senior year, from $30.00 upwards for photography and 
sphygmography. 



CORRESPONDENCE COURSES, 



SECRETARIAL DEPARTMENT. 



This is a provision in response to a deeply felt and widely ex- 
pressed need for extending as far as possible the advantages of the 
Secretarial Department. Many have had only a partial training for 
the secretaryship, some none at all, and still others, though recog- 
nizing their lack and desirous of more thorough preparation, have 
been unable for various causes to obtain it. 

The Correspondence Course includes the whole of the Depart- 
ment Course outlined on pages 18-22 (excepting gymnastics and 
athletics), and not the General Biblical Course outlined on pages 
12, 13, and personal con tact with both instructors and fellow students 
is necessarily forfeited ; yet, while thus limited, it is possible through 
intelligent direction to obtain much better results than could be 
expected from unaided individual effort. The instructors are the 
same as in the regular department course. 

The outline consists of two parts. The first embraces the 
"Field, Objects, and History" of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, and "The Organization and its Home" (see pages 18, 19). 
The second part includes "Methods of Work," and "General 
Supervision and Extension" (see pages 20, 21). "The Hand Book 
of Young Men's Christian Associations" — Edition of 1892, is used 
as a text-book. By close application of at least one hour a day the 
course may be covered within one year. 

The method of study, based upon the same general plans as have 
been used by the Chautauqua College during the past with so much 
, success, embraces written questions, answers, outlines, suggestions, 
collateral reading and study, papers, reviews, and examinations. 
Reviews are required at the completion of the first and second parts 
of the course, and a certificate will be given to those passing 70 per 
cent, in an examination upon the whole. 

This method admits of the practical application of lessons 
studied, cultivates the art of composition, promotes clear thinking 



35 



36 



and exactness of expression, and develops habits of reading and 
study. Specimen lesson leaves will be mailed upon application. 

Admission. — The Correspondence Course is designed for General 
Secretaries and Assistants. Others who are specially fitted may 
take the course if approved by the instructors. Students are re- 
ceived at any time. 

Fees.— An enrollment fee of $$ is required when the student is 
admitted. The tuition fee is $20 for the course ; one-half payable 
when the studies are begun, the other half at the beginning of the 
second part of the course. The expense of text-book and postage 
on correspondence will not exceed $5. 

Postage. — Students must enclose stamps each time of writing, 
sufficient for return postage. 



For List of Correspondence Students, see page 9. 



PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



The aim will be to meet as far as possible by correspondence the 
needs of those who are unable to come to Springfield, but who 
desire the advantages that are offered here in the direction of 
Physical Education. 

This course is designed for physical directors and assistants ; 
others who are specially fitted to take it may join if approved by 
the instructors. Those who are unable on account of financial 
difficulties to come to the school can avail themselves of this oppor- 
tunity to secure a considerable part of the desired training, and at 
the same time be supporting themselves. Physical directors who 
realize the need of further study along these lines are thus offered 
the desired opportunity. A person able to spend but one year at 
the school could so prepare himself by correspondence that this 
year would suffice to complete the Department Course and enable 
him to graduate. 

The work demanded by the course will be considerable. This is 
necessary, as the ground to be covered is large and the knowledge 
needed is thorough. 

The instruction will, of course, be individual ; progress can thus 
be made as slow or as rapid as circumstances may demand or allow. 
It will be found advantageous, however, to give to it not less than 
two hours daily. 

A series of courses will be arranged for correspondence work. 



37 



Each course will consist of forty sections, each section consisting 
of five lessons, each of which will demand on an average two hours' 
study. The subject matter covered will be the same as that covered 
at the school (for outline see pages 25-29). The same text-books 
will be used. Work will be given out for each day, important points 
noted and difficulties explained. 

The first forty sections are divided as follows: Physiology, 20; 
Sphygmograph, 1; Personal Purity, 7; Physiology of Bodily Exer- 
cise, 8 ; First Aid, 4. 

The second course takes up Animal Mechanics, a study of the 
bones, muscles and body movements ; Hygiene ; and Training. 

Those subjects which as yet have no satisfactory text-books and 
which are given in the form of lectures will be written out for the 
use of the students taking the Correspondence Course. 

There will be frequent written examinations. The students of 
this department will have the same privilege of questioning on 
difficult points connected with the subject as have those actually 
on the ground. 

Tuition will be twenty-five dollars for each course of forty sec- 
tions ; fifteen payable on registration and ten on completion of 
the first twenty sections. All expense for postage will be met by 
the student. 



For List of Correspondence Students, see page 10. 



38 

TEXT BOOKS. 



Note.— The first column gives the special prices at which the books are offered to our students 
in Springfield; if ordered by mail or express, transportation will be extra, The second column 
gives the regular list prices. 

List No. i. 

Common to students of both departments. 

Special. List. 

Robinson, English Harmony of the Gospels, $1.35 $1.50 
Handbook of Young Men's Christian Associations 

— Edition of 1891, (about) 2 00 

Hopkins, Outline Study of Man, 1.55 1.75 

" Law of Love and Love as a Law, 1.35 1.75 

Morton, Handbook of First Aid, .25* .25 

Roberts, Rules of Order, .55 .75 

List No. 2. 

In addition to List No. i, the Secretarial Department students 
will use the following: 

Smith, Old and New Testament Histories (Harper's 

Student Series), 2 vols., each, 1.04 1.25 

Fisher, History of the Christian Church, 2.50 3.50 

Rhetoric, (about) 1.25 f 

Martin, Human Body (Briefer Course), 1.20 1.50 



List No. 3. 

In addition to List No. i, the Physical Department students 
will use the following: 

Gould, Medical Dictionary, 3.00 3.25 

Gray, Anatomy, $.40 6.00 

Baljour Stewart, Elements of Physics. 1.10 1.25 

Martin, Human Body (large edition), 2.20 2.75 

Hygiene, (about) 1.25! 

Acton, Reproductive Organs, 1.80 2.00 

Gymnastics, .90 100 

Lagrange, Physiology of Bodily Exercise, 1.50 1.75 

Page, Physical Diagnosis, 180 2.00 

Murrell, Massage as a Mode of Treatment, 1.35 1.50 

Schaible, Systematic Training of the Body, 1.50 2.00 



* No discount from list prices, 
t Book not decided npon. 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 



Inquiries concerning the finances will receive immediate atten- 
tion if addressed to Oliver C. Morse, Secretary International 
Y. M. C. A. Training School, Springfield, Mass., and remittances 
may be made payable to his order. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath to the International Young Men's Christian 
Association Training School,, Springfield, Mass., the sum of 
dollars.* 



BEQUEST FOR ENDOWMENT. 



I give and bequeath to the International Young Men's Christian 
Association Training School, Springfield, Massachusetts, the sum 
of , to be safely invested by them and called 

the Fund. The interest of this fund to be 

applied to the use of the School.* 



PERPETUAL LOAN FUND. 



For the purpose of founding a perpetual loan fund in the Inter- 
national Young Men's Christian Association Training School, 
Springfield, Mass. (or either of its departments, if so stated), I 
hereby give the sum of five thousand dollars — or its equivalent in 
good securities at cash value— to be safely invested by them, the 
income to be loaned toward the education of students who have 
already shown ability in the School. 



* Or the testator may specify, towards the current expenses; or towards the support of a chair 
of instruction in the general course, or in either of the departments; or to be used as a loan 
toward the education of students who have shown ability in either of the departments. 



FOR GENERAL INFORMATION 



concerning the School or its finances, apply to 

Oliver C. Morse, Secretary Int. Y. M. C. A. Training School, 
Springfield, Mass. 



FOR SPECIAL INFORMATION 

concerning the Departments or admission to the School, address : 
J. T. Bowne, Supt. Secretarial Dept., 35 Clarendon St. 
Luther Gulick, M.D., Supt. Physical Dept., 153 Westminster St. 
Springfield, Mass. 



c 



INTERNATIONAL 
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
TRAINING SCHOOL, 
SPRINGFIELD, MASS., U. S. A. 



SEVENTH CATALOGUE, 
1891-92. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Admission, Terms of — Regular Courses, 30 

" " Correspondence Courses, 33, 34 

Bequest, Forms for, Inside back cover 

Calendar, . . . " 3 

Contributions, How Made, etc., . . . . . Inside back cover 

Corporation, 4 

Correspondence Course— Secretarial Department, .... 32, 33 

Physical " 33,34 

Design, 2 

Expenses, Estimate of— Regular Courses, 31 

" " Correspondence Courses, .... 33, 34 

General Course of Instruction, . 12, 13 

Graduation, Conditions of, 29 

Information, How to Get It, Outside back cover 

Instructors, , n 

Officers, 5 

Physical Department— Department Course, 21-27 

" " Correspondence Course, . . ., . .33, 34 

Promotions, Conditions of, 28 

Rooms and Bedding, 30 

Schedule of Class Work, 28, 29 

Secretarial Department— Department Course, 14-19 

" " Special Lectures, 19 

" " Correspondence Course, . . . 32, 33 

Students — Regular Session, 1891-92, 6, 7 

" Correspondence, 8, 9 

" Summer Session, 1891, 9, 10 

Tuition (see Expenses above). 



1891-2. 
SEVENTH CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
TRAINING SCHOOL, 

SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS. 




WITH PROSPECTUS FOR 1892-3. 



MAY, 1892. 



PRESS OF 
CLARK W. BRYAN AND COMPANY. 
1892. 



THE "DESIGN OF THE SCHOOL: 

To train young men as Secretaries, Physical "Directors, or other 
officers of Young Men's Christian Associations. 



CALENDAR. 



Commencement Exercises and Annual Meeting of the Corpora- 
tion and Board of Trustees, Wednesday, June 8, 1892. 

Quarterly Meetings of the Trustees on the third Wednesdays of 
March, September, and December. 



SUMMER CONFERENCE ON PHYSICAL TRAINING. 

Begins Thursday morning, June 2, 1892. 
Closes Saturday afternoon, June 11, 1892. 



EIGHTH REGULAR SCHOOL YEAR, 1892-93. 

Fall Term -! Begins Wednesday afternoon, September 7, 1892. 

( Ends Wednesday evening, December 21, 1892. 

WINTER VACATION. 

Wtntft? Tfrat i Begins Wednesday morning, January 4, 1893. 
winter 1 erm | Ends Friday evening, March 24, 1893. 



SPRING VACATION. 



{ Begins Tuesday morning, April 4, 1893. 
Spring Term ■< Commencement Exercises, Wednesday evening, 
< June 14, 1893. 



CORRESPONDENCE COURSES. 
Students may engage in the Correspondence courses at any time. 



The Calendar is subject to change. 
3 



CORPORATION. 



The names of Trustees are italicized. 



Australia, N. S. W., Sidney, David Walker. 

" Vict., Melbourne, H. A. Wilcox. 
France, Paris, E. Buscarlet. 
Germany, Berlin, Count Andreas Bernstorff. 
Gt. Br., England, London, M. H. Hodder. 

W. H. Mills. 
" Ireland, Belfast, Robert McCann. 
" Scotland, Glasgow, W. M. Oatts. 
" " Portobello, R. H. Smith. 

India, Madras, W. Rierson Arbuthnot. 

" " David McConaughy, Jr. 
Japan, Tokyo, John T. Swift. 
Sweden, Carlskrona, Baron Edward Barnekow. 
Switzerland, Geneva, Rev. Gustave Tophel. 
British Columbia, Victoria, F. W. Teague. 
Manitoba, Winnepeg, C. M. Copeland. 

R. J. Whitla. 
Nova Scotia, Halifax, E. W. Gorton. 
Ontario, Hamilton, F. M. Pratt. 
" Toronto, Thos. S. Cole. 

" Robert Kilgour. 
Quebec, Montreal, D. A. Budge. 

D. W. Ross. 
F.W. Kelley. 
Ala., Birmingham, Joseph Hardie. 

" Marion, C. W. Lovelace. t 
Ark., Little Rock, Col. Logan H. Roots. 
Cal., San Francisco, H. J. McCoy. 
Colo., Denver, Alfred W. Chamberlin. 
" " H. B. Chamberlin. 

" " Donald Fletcher. 

Conn., Bridgeport, W. E. Colley. 
" Hartford, Cltas. A. Jewell. 
" Meriden, W. A. Kelsey. 
" Southport, Elbert B. Munroe. 
Ga. , Atlanta, W. Woods White. 
111., Chicago, /. E. Brown. 
Ind., Indianapolis, Dr. L. H. Dunning. 

" Richmond, Albert G. Shepard. 
Ia., Des Moines, W. A. Magee. 
" " " E. D. Sampson. 
Kan., Topeka, R. B. Gemmell. 
Ky., Louisville, J. L. Wheat. 
Me., Portland, T E. McDonald. 
Md., Baltimore, W. H. Morriss. 
Mass., Boston, R. M. Armstrong. 
" " J. W. Cook. 
" " Jas. L. Gordon. 
" " Chas. A. Hopkins. 

" H.M. Moore. 
" Cambrioge. O. H. Durrell. 
" Campello, Preston B. Keith. 
" Fitchburg, Frederick Fosdick. 
" Manchester, Russell Sturgis. 
" Springfield, Dr. W. F. Andrews. 
"• " Chas. H. Barrows. 

" " H. H. Bowman. 

J. T. Bowne. 
" " Geo. D. Chamberlain. 

" *• E. Porter Dyer. 

" Luther Gulick, M. D. 
" " Charles Marsh, t 

" " Arthur G. Merriam. 

" " Oliver C. Morse. 

" Rev. David Allen Reed. 
" ' Henry S. Lee. 

Mich., Detroit. H. G. Van Tuyl. 



Minn., Minneapolis, C. E. Dyer. 

John H. Elliott. 

" St. Paul, Thomas Cochran. 

T. A. Hildreth. 
Mo., Kansas City, Witten McDonald. 

" St. Louis, Geo. T. Coxhead. 

" " Frank L. Johnston. 

Thos. S. McPheeters. 
Neb., Omaha, J. C. Denise, M. D. 

" Yutan, Robert Weidensall. 
N. H., Concord, Allen Folger. 

" " E. A. Lawrence. 

N. J., Newark, Aaron Carter, Jr. 

" Elkanah Drake. 

" New Brunswick, Frank L.Janeway. 

" Orange, D. F. More. 

" Plainfield, W. D. Murray. 

" Summit, Chas. B. Grant. 
N. Y., Addison, Burton G. Winton. 

" Brooklyn, F. B. Schenck. 

" Edwin F. See. 

" Buffalo, M. Clement, Jr. 

" " John B. Squire. 

" Medina, W. A. Bowen. 

" New York, Cephas Brainerd. 

" " Thomas K. Cree. 

C C. Cuyler. 
" Cleveland H. Dodge. 
Geo. A. Hall. 

" " R. R. McBurney. 

" " Richard C. Morse. 

J. Gardner Smith, M. D. 

" " Erskine Uhl. 

" " Henry H. Webster.t 

" " A. J. D. Wedemeyer. 

" B'nj. C. Wetmore. 
I. C. Wilson.t 
L D. Wishard. 

" Troy, L. E. Gurley. 
N. C, Charlotte, L. A. Coulter. 

" Davidson College, Prof. H. L. Smith. 
Ohio, Cincinnati, H. P. Lloyd. 

H. Thane Miller. 
Ore., Portland, Noel H. Jacks. 
Penn., Berwick, C. H. Zehnder. 

" Erie, C. W. Davenport. 

" Philadelphia, John H. Converse. 

" «' Thos. DeWitt Cuyler. 

" Pittsburgh, S. P. Harbison. 

" Scranum. H . M. Boies. 
R. I., Peace Dale, R. G. Hazard, ad. 

" Providence, H. S. Conant. 
S. C, Charleston, A. T. Jamison. 

" Columbia, A T. Smythe. 
Tenn., Chattanooga, J. B. Milligan. 

" Knoxvitle, James H. Cowan. 

" Nashville, James Bowron. 

" " J. B. O'Bryan. 

Texas, Dallas, A. F. Hardie. 

" Fort Worth, Wm. C. Winthrop. 
Vt., Brattleboro, Col. J. J. Estey. 

" Burlington, W. J. Van Patten. 

" Montpeher, A. J. Howe. 

" St. Johnsbury, Col. Franklin Fairbanks. 
Va., Richmond, Joseph Bryan. 
Wash., Seattle, E. C. Kilbourne. 

" Spokane, Walter Hnghson. 
Wis., Milwaukee, Geo. J. Rogers. 



t Deceased. 



OFFICERS. 



President, 
HENRY S. LEE. 



Vice-President, 



H. B. CHAMBERLIN. 



Treasurer, 
GEO. D. CHAMBERLAIN. 



Secretary, 
OLIVER C. MORSE. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE : 



R. C. Morse, 



R. R. McBurney, 



C. H. Barrows, 



E. F. See, Dr. W. F. Andrews, H. H. Bowman, 
with officers ex officio. 

AUDITOR : 

H. H. Bowman. 



The control of this school is vested in the Trustees, of whom six, 
with the officers ex officio, constitute an Executive Committee. 

The Trustees are chosen by the Corporation, a majority of whom 
are nominated by the International Convention of Young Men's 
Christian Associations. The instructors are appointed by the 
Trustees. 



THE CONTROL. 



5 



STUDENTS, 1891-92. 



SECRETARIAL DEPARTMENT. 



SENIORS. 



Carey, Wilbert Franklin, 
Davis, William Henry, 
*Dick, John M., 
Ishikawa, Gen Samuro, 
Kingsbury, Charles Henry, 
Libby, Eugene Samuel, 
Patton, Thomas Duncan, 
*Spence, Donald MacKay, 
Weller, George Radford, 



Williamsport, Pa. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Yonkers, N. Y. 
Tokio, Japan. 
Killingly, Conn. 
Redlands, Cal. 
Montreal, Que. 
Nashua, N. H. 
Yonkers, N. Y. 



JUNIORS. 



Archibald, Lyman Walker, 
Barnes, Frank Everts, 
Chase, William Richmond, 
Day, George Edward, 
French, Benjamin Snell, 
Gelan, Henri, 
Hildner, Ernst Gotthold, 
Kaighn, Raymond Pimlotte, 
Mahan, Frank, 
Macdonald, Finlay Grant, 
Ruggles, Edward Pakenham, 
*Sayford, Raphael, 
Thompson, John George, 
Wilkinson, Thomas Gregg, 
Willcock, Frank, 



Truro, N. S. 
Montpelier, Vt. 
New Bedford, Mass. 
Westfield, Mass. 
Amsterdam, N. Y. 
Bischweiler, Alsace, Ger. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Sunny Brae, Pictou, N. S. 
Milton, Mass. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
New Glasgow, N. S. 
Claussen, S. C. 
Orangeburg, S. C. 



'Studied only part of the year. 



7 



PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Black, Walter Orlando, 
*Bond, Thomas Parsons, 
Driver, James Kemp, 
Exner, Max Joseph, 
Finch, George Hardy, 
Foss, Peter Lenord, 
Macartney, John William 
Van Leuven, Byron, 



seniors. 

Grand Ridge, 111. 
Cassopolis, Mich. 
Galesburg, 111. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Peoria, 111. 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 
, ' Springfield, Mass. 

San Bernardino, Cal. 



juniors. 



*Abbott, Frederick C., 
Burkhardt, Frederick William, 
Haskell, Claire Ellis, 
McCastline, Robert, 
Rideout, Melvin Bragdon, 
Smith, Harvey Leigh, 
Webb, Albert Elmer, 



Waterbury, Conn. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Chelsea, Mass. 
New York City. 
Ottumwa, Iowa. 
Attleboro, Mass. 
New Haven, Conn. 



*Studied only part of the year. 



8 



CORRESPONDENCE STUDENTS, 1891-2. 



SECRETARIAL DEPARTMENT. 



Burns, George, Assistant Secretary, 
Davidge, John Beal, General Secretary, 
Denham, J. F., General Secretary, 
^Foster, Harry Schuyler, Gen. Sec, 
Fraser, Neil Frank, General Secretary, 
Gillison, John Thomas, General Secretary, 
Gregg, A. S., General Secretary, 
Haller, Charles P., Assistant Secretary, 
Hewer, Basil, Gen. Sec. Anglo-Amer. Br., 
Jones, Oliver A., General Secretary, 
Kadel, William J., General Secretary, 
Lunger, James Orian, General Secretary, 
McLennan, Alexander C, Asst. Sec, 
Monroe, Edwin D., General Secretary, 
Morrow, Ernest S., Asst. Sec R. R. Br., 
Overdorf, George A., General Secretary, 
Pedersen, Louis Haapstock, Gen. Sec, 
Porter, Christopher C, General Secretary, 
Powell, Crayton Kenneth, General Sec, 
Robeson, Robert, Assistant Secretary, 
Stafford, Abel J., Assistant Secretary, 
Sterner, G. B. McClellan, Executive Sec, 
Tainter, A. L., Assistant Secretary, 
Tenney, Walter L., General Secretary, 
Terry, Alfred, General Secretary, 
Wilmerton, William Nyce, General Sec, 



Lexington, Ky. 
Marshall, Tex. 
Fort Howard, Wis. 
Sing Sing, N. Y. 
Summerside, P. E. I. 
Pekin, 111. 
Olympia, Wash. 
Meriden, Conn. 
Paris, France. 
Hoosick Falls, N. Y. 
Chambersburg, Pa. 
Babylon, N. Y. 
New Brunswick, N. J. 
Waterford, N. Y. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Hampton, Va. 
Astoria, Oregon. 
Houston, Tex. 
York, Neb. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Gettysburg, Pa. 
Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
Warsaw, N. Y. 
Ironwood, Mich. 
Chester, Pa. 



♦Studied only part of the year. 



9 

PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Caswell, C. E., Ass't Sec. and Phys. Dir., 


Wichita, Kas. 


Chase, J. M., 


Paterson, N. J. 


Cook, E. B., 


Albany, N. Y. 


Crane, F. W. 


Cincinnati, Ohio. 


Greiner, Prof. Philip, Physical Director, 


Evanston, 111. 


Hopkins, G. W., 


Cleveland, Ohio. 


*Kallenberg, Robert, 


New York City. 


Meylan, G. L., Physical Director, 


Bangor, Me. 


Sauerbrey, H. S., Physical Director, 


Winona, Minn. 


Stolte, Diedrick, Jr., 


Brattleboro, Vt. 


Weston, R. L., Physical Director, 


St. Paul, Minn. 


Whiteside, H. I., Physical Director, 


Jersey City, N. J. 



STUDENTS AT SUMMER SESSION, 1891. 



Barrett, S. E., General Secretary, 
Berry, W. D., Student, 
Bond, T. P., Student, 
Brown, C. H., 
Butter worth, H., 

Carmichael, H. O., Physical Director, 
Chase, Jas. M., 

Cooke, E. R., Physical Director, 
Cooke, L. J., Physical Director, 
Daniels, T. C, Physical Director Trinity 

College, 
Ferguson, G. T., 
Garland, A. E., Student, 
Goodrich, C. M., 
Halsted, A. T., M. D., Student, 
Harris, C. E., Physical Director, 
Howland, J. A., Physical Director, 



West Springfield, Mass. 
Springfield, Mass. 



New York City. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Paterson, N. J. 
Toledo, O. 
Duluth, Minn. 

Durham, N. C. 
Providence, R. I. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Burlington, Vt. 
Springfield, Mass. 
St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Providence, R. I. 



•■Studied only part of the year. 



10 



Hunton, W. A., Secretary International 

Committee, 
King, E. A., General Secretary, 
Kixnicutt, W. H., Physical Director, 
Lorixg, B. T., Physical Director, 
Lund, A. G., General Secretary, 
Macomber, L. E., General Secretary, 
Mangum, C. S., Physical Director, Univer- 
sity North Carolina, 
Miller, W. J., Physical Director, 
Minges, J. A., Physical Director, 
Pohlmann, A., Assistant Physical Director 

Pennsylvania College, 
Pollard, J. H., General Secretary, 
Ralsten, F. H., Physical Director, Wesleyan 

University, 
Rhodes, H. E., General Secretary Railroad 
Branch, 

Smith, C. H., General Secretary Railroad 

Department, 
Stephens, G. G., Physical Director Oak 

Ridge Institute, 
Syrett, E. C, Student, 
Taylor, D. D., General Secretary, 
Van Leuven, Byron, Student, 
Went worth, H. B., 
White, J. H., Physical Director, 
Whiteside, H. I., Physical Director, 
Wilder, E. W., Physical Director, 



New York City. 
Chicopee Falls, Mass. 
New Bedford, Mass. 
Hamilton, Ont. 
Westfield, Mass. 
Fulton, N. Y. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Sunbury, Pa. 
Williamsport, Pa. 

Gettysburg, Pa. 
Greenfield, Mass. 

Middletown, Conn. 

Springfield, Mass. 

Port Jervis, N. Y. 

Oak Ridge, N. C. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Bristol, Tenn. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 
New .Brunswick, N. J. 
Bridgeton, N. J. 
New Castle, Pa. 



INSTRUCTORS. 



GENERAL COURSE : 
O. C. Morse, 219 Florida Street, 

Christian Evidences and Outlines of Fundamental Truths of the Bible. 
James Naismith, A.B., 92 Buckingham Street, 

Study of the Bible by Books, Outline Study of Alan, Ethics, 
Methods of Christian Work — Senior Year. 
Rev. T. H. Hawks, D.D., 626 Worthington Street, 

Bible History, Exegesis, and Church History. 

R. A. Clark, A.B., M.D., 786 State Street, 

Compostion, Rhetoric, Vocal Music, 
Abridged Physical Department Course. 



SECRETARIAL DEPARTMENT : 
J. T. Bowne, Supt. of Dept., 35 Clarendon Street, 

Regular and Abridged Secretarial Department Courses. 

F. W. Meyer, 998 State Street, 

Methods oj Christian Work—Junior Year. 
Department Correspondence Course. 



PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT : 

Luther Gulick, M.D., Supt. of Dept., 153 Westminster Street, 
History and Philosophy of Physical Exercise, Anthropometry. 

F. N. Seerley, M.D., 33 Pendleton Avenue, 

Animal Mechanics, Physiology and Hygiene. 

A. T. Halsted, Ph.G. M.D., 786 State Street, 

Physical Examinations, Gymnastic Therapeutics, 
Department Co7-respo?idence Course. 



1 1 



THE GENERAL COURSE. 



The General Course of instruction is largely common to the stu- 
dents of both departments.* It covers two years, and includes the 
following topics : 

Bible History and Exegesis. Outline Study of Man. 

History of Evangelical Chris- Christian Ethics. 

tianity. Practical Methods of Christian 

Christian Evidences. Work. 

Old and New Testament Canon. Rules for Deliberative Bodies. 

Fundamental Doctrines of the Composition and Rhetoric. 
Bible. Vocal Music. 

Books of the Bible. 

BIBLE HISTORY AND EXEGESIS. 

Junior Year. 

Biblical History (O. T.). 

The Life of Christ. 

Biblical Geography and Chronology. 

Senior Year. 

History of the Apostolic Church. 

Biblical Geography and Chronology (Continued). 

History of Evangelical Christianity : An outline presentation of 
its progress down to the present time, prominence being 
given to missions and the development of doctrine. 

New Testament Exegesis : Selections from Gospels and Epistles. 

Old Testament Exegesis : Selections from Psalms and Prophets. 

English Versions. 

Introduction. 

Text-books : Dr. Smith's Old and New Testament Histories (Har 
per's Student Series), Fisher's History of the Christian Church; 
Robinson's English Harmony of the Gospels. 

EVIDENCES, CANON, DOCTRINES, BOOKS. 

Junior Year. 

Outline Study of the Evidences of Christianity; The Divine and 
Human Authorship of the Bible, including the Inspiration, Genuine- 



* See Schedule on pages 28 and 29. Text Books on page 35. 



i3 



ness, and Canonicity of the Scriptures ; and the Fundamental Doc- 
trines held in common by evangelical denominations. 

Senior Year. 

Study of the books of the Bible, with special reference to the 
development of the great doctrines. 

OUTLINE STUDY OF MAN. 

Senior Year. 

The method is constructive, dealing with the operations and rela- 
tions of the physical, psychical, and the moral ; and leading up from 
unorganized matter to the complete unity of the triune man by the 
successive application of powers from without. 

Text-book: Dr. Mark Hopkins' Outline Study of Man. 

CHRISTIAN ETHICS. 

Senior Year. 

Covering the duties of man as a free moral agent. 

Text-book: Dr. Mark Hopkins' Law of Love and Love as a Law. 

COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC. 

Rhetoric is taught during the Junior year. Written compositions 
are required of all once in three weeks during the entire course. 
Students are expected to unite and work with one of the literary 
societies of the school. 

Manual : Roberts' Rules of Order. 

Text-book in Rhetoric : Not yet decided upon. 

VOCAL MUSIC 

Will be taught throughout the Junior year. The course will include : 
The laws of vibration and tones ; the study of the staff, notes and 
scales ; singing by note ; singing of church music and male chorus 
music. The object of the course being that all may acquire the 
ability to lead simple music. 

METHODS OF CHRISTIAN WORK, 

Under the following heads, receive special attention throughout both 
years : The Young Men's Meeting and its Methods ; How to Study 
and Use the Bible; How to Deal with Inquirers; The Workers' 
Training Class. 



SECRETARIAL DEPARTMENT. 



Object: Training for the special duties of the General Secre- 
taryship. 



DEPARTMENT COURSE OF STUDY * 

FIRST DIVISION— The Field, Objects, and History. 

1. The Field and Its Limits : 

(A) The Work— why needed ; (B) A Definite Work— for and 
by young men ; (C) The Aim Distinctively Religious ; (D) 
Relation to the Church ; (E) Relation to Other Religious 
Societies. 

2. Summary of the Objects and Work : 

(A) The Means Employed in Cities ; (B) The Means Em- 
ployed in Small Towns. 

3. The Rise and Growth of the Associations : 

(A) Origin of the Present Movement ; (B) Earlier Work for 
Young Men ; (C) Introduction into America and Work 
Prior to the Civil War ; (D) Army Work ; (E) Resumption 
of Home Work ; (F) Development of the Work ; (G) Loy- 
alty to the Church. 

SECOND DIVISION— The Organization and Its Home. 

4. Organization : 

(A) When and How to Organize ; (B) Practical Hints. 

5. The Constitution. 

(A) General Considerations ; (B) A Suggestive Outline. 

6. Branches and Sub- Organizations. 

7. The Management. 

(A) The Directors ; (B) The Officers. 

*This is in addition to the whole of the General Course outlined on pages 12 and 13, and 
covers two years. See also Schedule of Class Work by departments on pages 28 and 29. 



14 



*5 



8. Standing Committees; 

(A) Importance, Enlistment, and Composition ; (B) How to 
Organize, the Chairman, etc. ; (C) Principles and Methods 
of Construction ; (D) Names and Duties. 

9. Me?7ibership: 

(A) Classes of Membership ; (B) How to Secure Members ; 
(C) The Membership Committee ; (D) How to Retain 
Members ; (E) Fees, Tickets, Records and Exchange ; (F) 
The Development ot Active Members ; (G) The Associate 
Membership and its Relations; (H) The Members' Meet- 
ing, or Reception. 

10. The General Secretary: 

(A) The Office and Work ; (B) The Qualifications. 

11. The General Secretary — His Relationships : 

(A) To Churches and Pastors; (B) To Officers, Directors, 
and Committees; (C) To Other Employees; (D) To the 
Members; (E) To the Religious Work ; (F) To the Busi- 
ness Community; (G) To his Fellow Secretaries. 

12. The General Secretary — Personal Hints: 

1, Accepting a Call ; 2, Beginning Work ; 3, Correspondence ; 
4, Prominent Visitors; 5, System ; 6, Memorandum Books ; 
7, Statistics; 8, Human Nature; 9, Dress; io, Conversa- 
tion; 11, Economy; 12, The Other Sex; 13, Health; 14, 
Growth ; 15, Spiritual Life. 

13. Securing and Training Employed Officers : 

(A) Demand and Supply; (B) Methods of Training. 

14. The Association Home: 

(A) Advantages of Owning a Building ; (B) Location ; (C) 
Arrangement and Construction ; (D) Equipment. 

15. The Care of the Home: 

(A) General Principles; (B) Repairs and Safety; (C) Order 
and Cleanliness. 

16. Ho7v to Get a Building : 

(A) Preparatory Work ; (B) Plan of a Canvass ; (C) Hints 
and Cautions. 

17. The Building Movement : 

Its Beginning and Growth. 

THIRD DIVISION— Methods of Work* 

18. Current Finances : 

(A) Ways and Means — (1) annual budget, (2) income, (3) 
solicitation ; (B) Collections and Disbursements ; (C) Finan- 
cial Book-keeping. 

♦Methods of Work are fully il'ustrated by approved records, blanks and printed matter, and 
wherever possible, practice will be required. 



19. Real Estate and Endowment Funds ; 

(A) Incorporation ; (B) Trustees ; (C) Endowment ; (D) Debt, 
Taxes, Insurance, and Leases. 

20. Records and Public Presentation of the Work : 

(A) Records and Statistics; (B) Anniversaries; (C) The Par- 
lor Conference; (D) Printed Matter— (1) the bulletin, (2) 
annual reports, etc. 
2t. The Bible in Association Work: 

(A) Individual Study — objects, methods and helps; (B) Class 
Study — (1) a Bible class indipensable, (2) relation of the 
general secretary, (3) divisions, beginners, advanced and 
training classes, (4) time, place, and appliances, (5) the 
the teacher, (6) the class, (7) the topics, (8) preparing the 
lesson, (9) teaching the lesson, etc. ; (C) Practical Work 
with the Unconverted — (1) personal work, (2) the evangel- 
istic Bible class, (3) the Bible in the evangelistic meeting ; 

(D) Bible readings. 

22. Religious Meetings, etc. : 

(A) The Young Men's Meeting ; (B) Other Meetings at the 
Rooms ; (C) Religious work Outside the Rooms — (1) in 
boarding houses, (2) work in public institutions, (3) sermons 
to young men, (4) distribution of religious reading matter, 
(5) the invitation committee. 

23. The Place and Value of the Secular Agencies. 

24. The Educatio?ial Department : 

(A) The Reading Room — furniture, supervision, papers and 
periodicals, how secured ; (B) The Library* — (1) growth of 
Association libraries, (2) reference and lending departments, 
(3) apartments, (4) classification and cataloguing, (5) charg- 
ing, (6) the librarian, (7) order, (8) selecting and buying 
books, (9) ways and means, (10) advertising the library ; (C) 
Educational Classes — (1) the need, (2) growth, (3) the com- 
mittee, (4) adaptation, (5) thoroughness, (6) frequency of 
classes, (7) instructors, classrooms and examinations; (D) 
Literary Societies — value, how organized and supervised; 

(E) Lectures and Talks— (1) use and abuse of lectures, (2) 
home talent, (3) practical talks. 

25. The Physical Department : 

(A) Aim of the Department — (1) health, (2) education, (3) 
recreation ; (B) Conditions under which a Physical Depart- 
ment should be started ; (C) Scientific Equipment and 
Methods— (1) examinations, (2) statistics, (3) prescription of 
exercise ; (D) Practical Equipment and Methods — ( 1) loca- 
tion and arrangement of gymnasium, (2) bath and dressing 

♦Arrangements can be made, if desired, for a special course in Association Library Work. 



i7 



rooms, (3) outfit of gymnasium, (4) methods of gymnastic 
work, (5) out-door work ; (E) The Religious Work ; (F) The 
Physical Director; (G) The Department Committee. (All 
Secretarial students will take the abridged course in Gym- 
nastics and Athletics on page 18.) 

26. The Social Department : 

(A) The Reception Committee ; (B) The Social Rooms ; (C) 
Social Entertainments. 

27. Information and Relief : 

(A) Boarding Houses; (B) The Employment Bureau; (C) 
Savings Bureau and Benefit Fund ; (D) Visiting the Sick ; 
(E) Destitute Young Men. 

28. Work for Boys : 

(A) History ; (B) Necessity, Aim and Benefits ; (C) Organiza- 
tion ; (D) Different Classes; (E) Methods and Agencies — 
(1) religious, (2) educational, (3) physical, (4) social. 

29. Work for Special Classes : 

(A) College Students— history, methods, outgrowths; (B) 
Railroad Men — (1) history, (2) aims and benefits, (3) organi- 
zation and finance, (4) rooms and methods ; (C) Commercial 
Travelers — the field, work, and agencies ; (D) Other 
Nationalities (1) the field, (2) the German work, (3) the 
Colored work, etc. ; (E) Miscellaneous Classes— (1) soldiers, 
and sailors, (2) deaf mutes, (3) lumbermen, (4) firemen s 
policemen, street car employes, etc. 

30. Women's Work for Young Me?i : 

Organization and Methods. 

FOURTH DIVISION— General Supervision and Extension. 

3 1 . State and Provincial Work : 

(A) History; (B) The State Committee; (C) Finances; (D) 
The State Secretary; (E) The State Convention— (1) pre- 
paratory work by the state committee, the programme, the 
convention circular, (2) preparatory work by local associa- 
tion, (3) at the convention ; (F) The District Work— (1) the 
committee, (2) conferences and visitation, (3) corresponding 
members; (G) The Relation of Local Associations to the 
• General Work. 

32. The America?i Internatio?ial Work: 

(A) History and Organization ; (B) The Field; (C) The Work 
— (1) supervision and extension, (2) correspondence, (3) 
publications, (4) securing and training employed officers, 
(5) aid to building enterprises, (6) aid in securing funds, (7) 



i8 



aid to state and other conventions, (8) help in disaster, (9) 
secretaries of the committee, (10) international finances, 
(11) international conventions, (12) day and week of prayer. 
33. The World's Alliance. 

History, Organization, and Work. 
Text-book : " Hand-book of the History, Organization and Meth- 
ods of Work of Young Men's Christian Associations." This book 
was prepared especially for the use of this school. 

During the entire course the students will have access to the 
City Library of more than £0,000 volumes, to the School Library 
and to the Historical Library of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciations ; and will also be required to engage in special courses of 
reading in connection with the department work. 

GYMNASTICS AND ATHLETICS.— Abridged Course. 

This course is a part of the regular prescribed work of the Secre- 
tarial Department, and every student therein is expected to engage 
faithfully in it. Its purpose is to give to each a practical knowledge 
of this work, that will enable him intelligently to direct a small 
gymnasium. A sufficient amount of theory will be given to insure 
the intelligent appreciation of the field. 

Each student will receive a physical examination, and work will 
be prescribed that will, as far as possible, put him in the best condi- 
tion for study and future work. 

Theory. — Elementary anatomy, physiology, and hygiene. 

In connection with these subjects will be taken up the philosophy 
of the different gymnastic systems, and the theory of massage. 

First aid to injured. 

Lectures on history of physical education, effect of body on the 
mind, literature of physical education. 
Measurements, how taken and used. 

Purity, scientific basis and methods of work for its advancement. 

Text-Books : Martin's Human Body (Briefer Course), Morton's 
Handbook of First Aid. 

Practice. — Calisthenics. Use of developing apparatus. 

Light Gymnastics, including dumb bells, wands, Indian clubs, 
etc. A calisthenic, dumb bell, and bar bell drill will be committed 
to memory. 

Heavy Gymnastics : vaulting, horizontal and parallel bars, horse, 
buck, etc. 

Athletics : walking, running, jumping, throwing the hammer, put- 
ting the shot, pole vaulting, base ball, foot ball, lawn tennis. 

Class work especially adapted to the needs of the Young Men's 
Christian Associations, on all of the apparatus, will be committed 
by the students. 



'9 



Notk. — In a number of instances attempts have been made to have the Assistant Secretary 
conduct the physical department. This is not so desirable as for the General Secretary himself 
to do it, having an assistant to relieve him in the general work of the Association in order that he 
may have the time. Work in the physical department gives the Secretary an opportunity to be- 
come acquainted with the associate membership such as is not afforded by any other department. 
It also involves his taking exercise that is necessary for his own well-being, and puts him before 
his membership in a desirable light. The fundamental idea of the Association — that it is an 
association and not a one-man affair — should be kept in mind here as in the other departments. 
Much can be done through the development of leaders, so that where the Secretary is directing 
the gymnasium, he ought after a time to be obliged to conduct only a leaders' class, all the other 
classes being led by the men whom he has trained. This is the simple application of the commit- 
tee idea to the physical department. 

DEPARTMENT PRACTICE. 

The Associations of Springfield are consolidated on the metro- 
politan plan, thus offering added advantages for practically illus- 
trating this system. 

During the whole of the Junior year, all students in this depart- 
ment are required to be members of the Armory Hill Branch of the 
local Association ; to do regular practical work on one or more of 
its standing committees ; and to attend all stated meetings of the 
committees to which appointed. 

During the Senior year, the same is required in connection 
with the Central Branch, unless the student is preparing especially 
for Railroad work, when he will be required to unite and work with 
the Railroad Branch. 

All are given practice in preparing monthly reports of commit- 
tees, minutes of meetings, items for newspapers and bulletins, 
printer's copy, and proof reading; and are expected to attend each 
year at least two Association Conventions. The instructors decline 
to grant leave of absence to attend conventions other than those 
prescribed in the Department Course. 

SPECIAL LECTURES AND CONFERENCES. 

June 2, 1891. — W. Hind Smith, Traveling Secretary of English 
National Council, London. "Association Work in Syria, India 
and Australia." 

October 30.— Rev. S. H. Lee, Springfield, Mass. "Recollections 
of the Portland International Convention of 1869, and the 'Evan- 
gelical Church Test.' " 

February 29, 1892.— James McConaughy, of Northfield, Mass. 
"The Bible in Association Work." 

April 25. — Thomas K. Cree, Secretary of International Commit- 
tee. "Some things to be ascertained when considering a call to a 
new field." 



20 



October 22-25, 1 891. —The students attended The 26th Massa- 
chusetts State Convention at Brockton, and 

May 26-31, 1892.— The 22ND Conference of the Association 
of General Secretaries of the United States and Dominion of 
Canada, at Providence, R. I. 



For Correspondence Course, see pages 32-33. 



For Text-Books and Prices, see page 35. 



PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



MOTTO— E Tribus Unum. 



Object : Training for the special duties of Physical Directors. 



The whole work of this department is founded on a few general 
principles, and all the studies are considered with reference to 
those principles. 

These principles are : 

I Unity. 

Man is a unit ; body, mind and soul forming one complete 
whole, neither complete without the others. 

II Law of Symmetry. 

The best results can be secured only when man as a whole 
is symmetrically developed, not merely each nature with 
reference to itself, but each nature in relation to the others. 
III. 11 Function makes structure" 

The doing of a thing tends to increase the ability to do that 
thing. Thus, doing all-round exercises, those which 
demand symmetrical bodies, tends to produce symmetry. 



DEPARTMENT COURSE.— TWO YEARS. 
THEORY. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. 

Animal Mechanics. — Based on physics and anatomy. Elemen- 
tary Physics, Balfour Stewart. Energy, Mechanical Powers, Study 
of the Lever. Gray's Anatomy. Osteology, pp. 220-295. Articu- 
lation, Lectures, Myology, pp. 362-487. Lectures on combined 



22 



action of muscles in gymnastics and athletics. Mechanism of 
bodily movements. Study of relations and insertions of muscles 
to power and speed. Relation of length of levers to capacity for 
different sports. Study of individuals as to muscular origin and 
insertion. 

Young Men's Christian Association. — The students in this 
department will be expected to cover during the Junior year an 
abridged course in Young Men's Christian Association work based 
upon the outline of the Secretarial Department, on pages 14-18. 

Second Term. 

Physiology. — Martin's " Human Body." (Large edition.) 
Especial attention will be given to the following : Structure of 
motor organs. Structure of muscle, muscular growth. Causes 
effecting growth. Physiology of muscle. Muscular fatigue and 
exhaustion. Muscular training, stiffness and rest. Local effects 
of exercise on muscle. Effects of massage on muscle. Physiology 
of the nervous system. Effects of the different kinds of exercise 
on the brain, spinal cord, and nerves. Effects of exercise on cir- 
culatory apparatus. " Wind " in training. Alteration of weight 
by exercise. Waste products of exercise. Energy-yielding foods. 
Muscle-building foods. Functions of brain and spinal cord. 
Special lectures on sight and the " subjective functions of the ner- 
vous system " will indicate the nature and method of the modern 
physiological psychology. 

Hygiene. — Considered with physiology in connection with 
appropriate chapters, with especial reference to the following : 
Duration of life. Causes of disease : heredity, use and abuse of 
stimulants, tobacco, abuses of eating, mental worry, immorality, 
late hours. Food and diet. Cleanliness: baths and bathing. 
Clothing : material, fashion, pressure. Habitations : ventilation, 
sanitary appliances, disinfection, hygiene of employment. 

Training. — Theory of, considered in connection with physi- 
ology. General principles and effects on the body. Dietetics. 
Training for wind, muscle, endurance, speed, habit. Effects of 
each. Training for all-round athletic contest. Training for in- 
dividual events : sprint running, high jumping, long distance run- 
ning, hammer throwing, putting shot, hurdle running. 

Young Men's Christian Association (Abridged Course). — 
Continued. (See First Term.) 



?3 



Third Term. 

Personal Purity. — Physiology of the reproductive organs. 
Effects of violation of the laws of purity; on the body, on the 
mind. Intellectual licentiousness ; cause, effects. Hygienic treat- 
ment. Quack doctors and their methods. 

First Aid to the Injured. — Hand-book of First Aid, Morton. 
Additional lecture on the treatment of sprains, muscular strains, 
and bruises. The use of bandaging for weak joints and the treat- 
ment of every-day wounds. 

Physical Department. — a. Fundamental basis and relation to 
other departments, b. Conditions for : demand, gymnasium com- 
mittee, leader, place, c. Methods and equipment : number of 
classes, leaders, and leaders' corps, visitors. Scientific (office) : 
Physical examination, prescription, measurements, personal purity- 
Practical (gymnasium, field) : kinds of exercise, exhibitions, com- 
petitions, d. Religious work : personal, Bible training class, e. 
Physical Director : Qualifications, spiritual, mental, physical ; 
training; duties. 

Young Men's Christian Association (Abridged Course). — 
Continued. (See First Term.) 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. 

Physiology of Bodily Exercise, Lagrange. — Physiological 
aspects of training. Wind, stiffness, and other questions of a 
similar nature. Exception is taken to Dr. Lagrange's position on 
the cause of breathlessness, and the relation of the lungs to chest 
expansion. 

Sphygmography. — The use of the sphygmograph in health. 
Each student will supply himself with a Dudgeon sphygmograph. 
The causation of the different elements of the tracings. Work 
and rest of the heart and arteries ; influence of cold, heat, gravity, 
compression, tea, coffee, tobacco, and stimulants. Each student 
will prepare in essay form a report of the experiments conducted 
by himself on some problem that shall be given him. The scien- 
tific or inductive method of study will here receive attention, the 
design being to conduct original scientific investigations by correct 
principles, and also to enable him to recognize correct and incor- 
rect inductions. 



24 



Physical Examination. — Physical Diagnosis, Page. Diseases 
and sequelae most frequently met with in the examining room. 
Auscultation, percussion. The use of inspection will be empha- 
sized. The rudiments of the examination of the eyes and ears. 

Massage. — Massage as a mode of treatment, Murrell. General 
principles as applied to development and training. Massage of 
sprains and strains. Medical massage is not included. 

Second Term. 

Gymnastic Therapeutics. — Underlying principles of the sub- 
ject rather than the details of application. The treatment of spinal 
curvature, functional cardiac difficulties, neurasthenia, general 
debility. 

Anthropometry. — Use of anthropometric apparatus. Meas- 
urements ; how taken, preserved, and used. Bodily measurement 
charts and their mathematical basis; the "percentile" method of 
Sir Francis Galton, the "physical height as a unit" method of Dr. 
Hitchcock, the ordinary "average" method. Typical versus per- 
fect form. Proper use of anthropometric charts, fallacies involved 
in some of them. Characteristics of different classes of gymnasts 
and athletes, Selection of men for competitive sports according 
to their physical characteristics. 

Literature of Physical Education. — The following books 
will be read by the students and discussed in the class-room : How 
to get Strong, Blaikie; Sound Bodies for our Boys and Girls, 
Blaikie ; Physical Education, Maclaren ; Walker's Manly Exercise, 
"Craven;" Brawn and Brain, Aldridge ; Physical Culture for Home 
and School, Dowd ; Health by Exercise, Taylor ; Physical Exer- 
c'se, Wood ; Athletics and Foot Ball, Shearman ; New Gymnastics 
for Men, Women, and Children, Lewis ; Education, Spencer; In- 
dian Club Exercises, Kehoe ; British Sports and Pastimes, Trollop c; 
Gymnastics for the Fingers and Wrists, Ward-Jackson; Exercise 
and Training, Their Effect on Health, Lee; University Oars, Mor- 
gan; Physical Education, Roth; The Brawnville Papers, Tyler; 
Man, Moral and Physical, Jones ; Swedish Educational Gymnastics, 
Posse; A Manual of Anthropometry, Roberts; Out-door Papers, 
Higginson; Salzman's Gymnastics for Youth. 

These pipers and pamphlets will also be studied: Anthropome- 
tric Manual, Amherst College, Hitchcock and Seelye ; The Physical 
Proportions of the Typical Man, Sargent; The Anatomy of the 



25 



Contortionist, Dwight ; Physical Training, Sargent; The Influence 
of Exercise on Health, Richards ; The Physical Development of 
Women, Sargent ; Military Drill and Gymnastic Training in Phys- 
ical Culture, Hartwell; Military Drill on Boys, Sargent ; Physiol- 
ogy of Exercise, Hartwell ; Physical Characteristics of the Athlete, 
Sargent; Hygiene for Base Ball Players, Leuf ; Proceedings of 
the American Association for the Advancement of Physical 
Education. 

The students will have the use of the Library on Physical Edu- 
cation. This has been built up mostly by the contributions of 
physical directors throughout the country, and, with the exception 
possibly of some private collections, is the largest library in our 
language on this subject. It contains upwards of three hundred 
volumes and nearly as many pamphlets, some of which are rare and 
valuable, besides files and current numbers of magazines. A sub- 
ject index of the whole will render available what has not hitherto 
been of service. 

Third Term. 

Photography. — Instantaneous photography of athletic work. 
Stereopticon slides. Time pictures of unusual cases in office. 
Flash light photography. Each student will supply his own outfit. 

History and Philosophy of Physical Education. — With re- 
views of the following books : Report of Boston Physical Training 
Conference; Systematic Training of the Body, Sch aible ; Physical 
Training in American Colleges, Hartwell; An Hour with Delsarte, 
Morgan; Gymnastic Progression, Enebuske. 

The design of this study is to give the student a clear knowledge 
of the work that has been done along these lines. The funda- 
mental principles and aims of each system will be studied. The 
athletics of the Greeks, influence on national life, the "Pentath- 
lon ; " German gymnastics, life of Jahn, Turnverein, school gym- 
nastics, military gymnastics ; gymnastics in Sweden, Ling and his 
work, Royal Gymnastic Institute at Stockholm, Swedish "move- 
ment cure ; " the renaissance of athletics in France, life and work 
of Delsarte ; English athletics ; physical education in America ; 
history of physical department of the Young Men's Christian 
Association. 

Reviews and special reading in preparation for graduating 
essays. 



26 



PRACTICE. 

The method of instruction in gymnastics and athletics is analytic 
and synthetic. It is called analytic because each exercise is ana- 
lyzed into the elementary movements of which it is composed. It 
is synthetic because after learning these elementary movements, 
they are gradually combined to form the exercise first shown. The 
student is thus led both to a thorough appreciation and compre- 
hension of the exercise as a whole, and to its intelligent performance. 

Although it is desired to give the student as wide a range of 
practice as possible, still it is deemed unwise to attempt any work 
of a hazardous nature. 

Special attention will be given to the building up of the weak 
parts of the student, and the development of a strong, erect, sym- 
metrical, and graceful figure. Two hours a day will be given to 
practice throughout both years. 

Gymnastics.— -Junior Year. Calisthenics. Use of Developing 
Apparatus : Chest weight, floor and overhead pulleys, etc. Light 
Gymnastics, Elementary, Dumb bells, Indian clubs, wands. Heavy 
Gymnastics, Elementary : Vaulting bar, horizontal bar, parallel 
bars, horse, buck. Special reference will be paid to gymnastic 
games. 

Senior Year. Sparring ; Wrestling ; Fencing ; Normal work, 
leading of classes, etc. Light Gymnastics : Dumb bells, Indian 
clubs, wands. Heavy Gymnastics : Vaulting bar, horizontal bar, 
parallel bars, horse, buck. 

Pedagogy. — Attention will be given to the art of teaching. Each 
student will be given practice in the actual leading of classes. 

Invention of Exercises. — Especial attention will be given to 
the construction of gymnastic drills to meet especial cases and 
classes. Each student will be required to prepare and submit such 
drills to the instructors. 

Athletics. — Seven acres of the permanent school grounds are 
given exclusively to this purpose, laid out as an Athletic Field, with 
running track, tennis courts, and ball field. Land adjoining, also 
owned by the school, will afford additional opportunity for practice 
in foot ball, basket ball, etc., when the regular grounds are occu- 
pied. Especial emphasis will be laid on the Pentathlon, or five- 
fold contest, consisting of the ioo-yard dash, running high jump, 
throwing 12-pound hammer, pole vault, and mile run. 

Aquatics. — Unusual facilities for rowing are afforded by the Con- 



^7 



necticut river. We have three four-oared gigs, two double gigs, 
one single gig, one shell, one sailing canoe, two birch bark canoes, 
and one St. Lawrence skiff, all these of course fully equipped. 

Each student will learn to swim in the various styles, and will be 
taught methods for rescuing and restoring the drowning. 

During the Junior year, all students of this department are re- 
quired to be members of the Armory Hill Branch of the local 
Association, to do regular practical work on one of its standing 
committees ; and to attend all stated meetings of the committee to 
which appointed. During the Senior year the same must be done 
in connection with the Central Branch. 

They will also be expected during the course to visit the large 
gymnasiums of either Boston or New York and that of either Har- 
vard, Yale, or Amherst ; also to attend each year two State or Inter- 
national Conventions of the Young Men's Christian Associations. 

Of the General course on pagesi2-i3, the students in this depart- 
ment take Systematic Bible Truth, Exegesis, Methods of Christian 
Work, Outline Study of Man, and Ethics, omitting Vocal Music, 
Rhetoric, Bible History, and Church History. 

See schedule of Class Room Work on pages 28-29. 



For Correspondence Course, see pages 33-34. 



For Text-Books and Prices, see page 35. 



2S 



SCHEDULE OF CLASS WORK. 



(liable to change.) 
JUNIORS. 







Secretarial Department. 


Physical Department. 


Tuesday. Monday. 


S.30 a. m. 

9-30 " 
10.30 
11.30 " 

2.00 p. m. 

3.00 " 

4.00 " 


Rhetoric. 

Physical Training. 

Abridged Physical Dep't Work. 
Bible History. 


Department Theory. 
Department Practice. 
Department Practice. 


8.30 a. m. 

9-3° " 
10.30 
11.30 " 

2.00 p. m. 

3.00 " 

4.00 " 


Systematic Bible Truth. 
Rhetoric. 

Physical Training. 

Vocal Music. 
Bible History. 


Systematic Bible Truth. 
Department Theory. 
Department Practice. 
Department Practice. 


Wednesday. J 


8.30 a. m. 

9-3o " 
10.30 
n.30 " 

2.00 p. m. 

3.00 " 

4.00 " 


Systematic Bible Truth. 

Department Work. 
Physical Training. 

Abridged Physical Dep't Work. 
Bible History. 


wSystematic Bible Truth. 
Department Theory. 
Department Practice. 
Department Practice. 

Abridged Secretarial Dep't Wk. 


Thursday. 


8.30 a. m. 

9-3° " 
10.30 
n.30 " 

2.00 p. m. 

3.00 " 

4.00 " 


Systematic Bible Truth. 

Department Work. 
Physical Training. 

Vocal Music. 


Systematic Bible Truth. 
Department Theory. 
Department Practice. 
Department Practice. 

Abridged Secretarial Dep't Wk. 


Friday. 


— 

8.30 a. m. 

9-3o " 
10.30 
11.30 " 

2.00 p. m. 

3.00 " 

4.00 " 


Department Work. 
Physical Training. 

Abridged Physical Dep't Work. 
Methods of Christian Work. 


Department Theory. 
Department Practice. 
Department Practice. 

Methods of Christian Work. 



All students are expected to attend daily prayers at 5 p. m., and to furnish 
original compositions once in three weeks. 

A Junior shall be eligible for promotion only after passing satisfactorily in 
every branch of the first year, and upon recommendation of the department 
superintendent. 



-9 



BY DEPARTMENTS. 
(liable to change.) 
SENIORS. 







Secretarial Department. 


Physical Department. 


Monday. 


8.30 a. m. 

9-3o " 
10.30 
11.30 " 

2.00 p. m. 

3.00 " 

4.00 " 


Systematic Bible Study. 
Department Work. 
Physical Training. 

Exegesis. 


Department Theory. 
Systematic Bible Study. 
Department Practice. 
Department Practice. 

Exegesis. 


>< 
< 
a 

m 
W 


8.30 a. m. 

9-3o " 
10.30 " 
11.30 " 

2.00 p. m. 

3.00 " 

4.00 '' 


Systematic Bible Study. 
Department Work. 
Physical Training. 

Exegesis. 


Department Theory. 
Systematic Bible Study. 
Department Practice. 
Department Practice. 

Exegesis. 


Q 

M 
Z 
Q 

£ 


8.30 a. m. 

9-3o " 
10.30 
11.30 * 

2.00 p. m. 

3.00 " 

4.00 " 


Systematic Bible study. 

Physical Training. 

Church History. 

Study of Man, or Ethics. 


Department Theory. 
Systematic Bible Study. 
Department Practice. 
Department Practice. 

Study of Man, or Ethics. 


Friday. Thursday. 1 


8.30 a. m. 

9-30 ;; 
10.30 
u.30 " 

2.00 p. m. 
3.00 " 
4.00 " 


Study of Man, or Ethics. 
Physical Training. 
Exegesis. 


Department Theory. 
Study of man, or Ethics. 
Department Practice. 
Department Practice. 

Exegesis. 


8.30 a. m. 

9.30 " 
10.30 " 
11.30 " 

2.00 p. m. 

3.00 " 

4.00 " 


Study of Man, or Ethics. 

Physical Training. 

Church History. 

Methods of Christian Work. 


Department Theory. 
Study of Man, or Ethics. 
Department Practice. 
Department Practice. 

Methods of Christian Work. 



Outline Study of Man during first and second terms ; Ethics during third 
term. 

A Senior shall be eligible for graduation only after passing satisfactorily in 
every branch of the course, and upon recommendation of the department super- 
intendent. 



3° 



TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

The Association Training School is open only to Christian 
young men, over eighteen years of age, who have already shown 
ability in the direction of the work for which they wish to prepare. 
Each applicant shall be a member in good standing of an evan- 
gelical church, and if admitted shall bring a certificate to this 
effect and unite and work with some church of his choice in this city. 

Each applicant for admission shall give evidence of having had 
at least a fair English education. If a graduate of a college or 
high school, he shall, upon entering, show his certificate of gradua- 
tion; if not, he must, before, he can be accepted, pass a preliminary 
examination. Applicants for the physical department will also 
have a physical examination. Business experience is very desirable. 

Several weeks are sometimes required in making a thorough in- 
vestigation, hence the desirability of making application as early 
as possible. Only after satisfactory reports are received can any 
student be admitted to the school. The school year begins with 
the first Wednesday in September. Students who enter for one 
year, or the course, will not be admitted after the last of Septem- 
ber. In extreme cases men will be admitted for a part of a year, 
but nothing aside from the regular work is promised to such. 

It will be greatly to the advantage of all to enter at the beginning 
of the year, and too much emphasis cannot be laid upon the im- 
portance of taking the entire course. 

Each shall give at least one week's notice if for any reason he 
wishes to leave the school before the end of the year. 

Each is received upon probation ; and when it becomes clearly 
evident that the prerequisites for success are wanting, he will no 
longer be retained in the school. 

Each student who has not already done so is urged to read care- 
fully, in advance of his coming, " The Student's Manual," by Rev. 
John Todd. 



ROOMS. 

Each student lodging in the building will care for his own room, 
which must be kept scrupulously clean. He will be expected to pro- 
vide sheets, pillow and bolster slips, towels, and soap. Beds are all 
single, 3 feet in width; pillows, 18x26 inches; bolsters, 18x36 
inches. Rooms are liable to weekly inspection. 



3 1 



ESTIMATE OF EXPENSES 

FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR OF FORTY WEEKS. 



The following table is based upon the experience of 1891-92. 





Secretar 


!al 


Physi 


cal 




Departms 


:nt. 


Departi 


nem. 


Table board, 


$100 to 5 


150 


$TOO tO 


$150 


Furnished room with light and heat, 


40 " 


55 


40 


55 


Tuition, 


50 " 


50 


50 " 


50 


Gymnasium suits,* 


S " 


12 


2 5 


40T 


Washing, 


12 " 


20 


12 " 


20 


Text and note books (see page 35), 


12 " 


20 


20 '* 


35 


Conventions, 


15 " 


18 


15 " 


18 


Full membership in local Association, 


2 " 


2 


2 " 


2 



$239 to $327 $264 to $370$ 
The above estimate covers only the items specified, and 
not other necessary incidentals, wh ich each must calcu- 
late for himself . 

The expenses of transients vary from $5.00 to $7.00 per week. 

Only forty-four students can be lodged in the present building, 
and rooms are assigned as the students are accepted ; rooms so 
assigned, unless by special engagement, will not be held more 
than one day after the opening of the term. Furnished rooms 
outside the building cost from $1.25 to $2.00 per week; table 
board, from $3.00 to $4.00 per week. 

Tuition is payable prornptly on the last Mondays in September 
and January, one-half at each payment. Room rent, on last Mon- 
day in each month. No reduction of rent will be made to a stu- 
dent who engages a room and fails to appear at the specified time, 
nor to one who vacates his room less than a month before the 
close of the school. Rent stops only when the room is vacated 
and the key delivered to the janitor. A deposit of twenty-five cents 
will be required for each key to the entrance of the gymnasium. 

Students will save themselves trouble and expense by bringing 
exchange on New York and Boston banks rather than local checks. 

*Students are advised not to purchase gymnasium or athletic suits before coming to the school, 
as the school has regulation colors and suits which all are expected to wear. 

^Gymnasium. — Long-sleeved jersey, #3.00 ; pants, $300; belt. 50c; shoes, £2.50. Field. — 
Football suit (including shoes), $8.00; sleeveless jersey, $2.50; sweater, £3.50; spiked shoes, 
$4.50; tennis shoes, $2.50; running pants, 75c; hat, 50c. 

$To this should be added in the Senior year from $30.00 upwards for photography and 
sphygmography. 



CORRESPONDENCE COURSES. 



SECRETARIAL DEPARTMENT. 



This is a provision in response to a deeply felt and widely ex- 
pressed need for extending as far as possible the advantages of 
the Secretarial Department. Many have had only a partial train- 
ing for the secretaryship, some none at all, and still others, though 
recognizing their lack and desirous of more thorough preparation, 
have been unable for various causes to obtain it. 

The Correspondence Course includes the whole of the Depart- 
ment Course outlined on pages 14-18 (excepting gymnastics and 
athletics), and not the General Biblical Course outlined on pages 
12-13, and personal contact with both instructors and fellow students 
is necessarily forfeited ; yet, while thus limited, it is possible 
through intelligent direction to obtain much better results than 
could be expected from unaided individual effort. The instructors 
are the same as in the regular department course. 

The outline consists of two parts. The first embraces the 
" Field, Objects, and History " of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, and "The Organization and its Home" (see pages 14-15). 
The second part includes " Methods of Work," and " General 
Supervision and Extension '* (see pages 16-17). "The Hand Book 
of Young Men's Christian Associations " — Edition of 189 1, is used 
as a text-book. By close application of at least one hour a day 
the course may be covered within one year. 

The method of study, based upon the same general plans 
as have been used by the Chautauqua College during the past 
with so much success, embraces written questions, answers, out- 
lines, suggestions, collateral reading and study, papers, reviews, 
and examinations. Reviews are required at the completion of the 
first and second parts of the course, and a certificate will be given 
to those passing 70 per cent, in an examination upon the whole. 



32 



33 



This method admits of the practical application of lessons 
studied, cultivates the art of composition, promotes clear thinking 
and exactness of expression, and develops habits of reading and 
study. Specimen lesson leaves will be mailed upon application. 

Admission. — The Correspondence Course is limited to those 
now engaged in the Secretaryship or Assistant Secretaryship. 
Students are received at any time. 

Fees. — An enrollment fee of $5 is required when the student is 
admitted. The tuition fee is $20 for the course ; one-half payable 
when the studies are begun, the other half at the beginning of the 
second part of the course. The expense of text-book and postage 
on correspondence will not exceed $5.00. 

Postage. — Students must enclose stamps each time of writing 
sufficient for return postage. 



For List of Correspondence Students, see page 8. 



PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



The aim will be to meet as far as possible by correspondence 
the needs of those who are unable to come to Springfield, but who 
desire the advantages that are offered here in the direction of 
Physical Education. 

This course is designed for physical directors and assistants ; 
others who are specially fitted to take it may join if approved by 
the instructors. Those who are unable on account of financial 
difficulties to come to the school can avail themselves of this oppor- 
tunity to secure a considerable part of the desired training, and at 
the same time be supporting themselves. Physical directors who 
realize the need of further study along these lines are thus offered 
the desired opportunity. A person able to spend but one year at 
the school could so prepare himself by correspondence that this 
year would suffice to complete the Department Course and enable 
him to graduate. 

The work demanded by the course will be considerable. This 
is necessary, as the ground to be covered is large and the knowl- 
edge needed is thorough. 



34 



The instruction will, of course, be individual ; progress can thus 
be made as slow or as rapid as circumstances may demand or 
allow. It will be found advantageous, however, to give to it not 
less than two hours daily. 

A series of courses will be arranged for correspondence work. 
Each course will consist of forty sections, each section consisting 
of five lessons, each of which will demand on an average two 
hours' study. The subject matter covered will be the same as that 
covered at the school (for outline see pages 21-25). The same 
text-books will be used. Work will be given out for each day, 
important points noted, and difficulties explained. Directions will 
be given for carrying on the experiments which are helpful in such 
studies as Physiology and Physics. 

The first forty sections are divided as follows : Physiology, 20; 
Sphygmograph, 1 ; Personal Pur.ity, 7 ; Physiology of Bodily 
Exercise, 8 ; First Aid, 4. 

Those subjects which as yet have no satisfactory text-books and 
which are given in the form of lectures will be written out for the 
use of the students taking the Correspondence Course. 

There will be monthly written examinations. The students of 
this department will have the same privilege of questioning on 
difficult points connected with the subject as have those actually 
on the ground. 

Tuition will be twenty-five dollars for each course of forty sec- 
tions ; fifteen payable on registration and ten on completion of 
the first twenty sections. All expense for postage will be met by 
the student. 



For List of Correspondence Students, see page 9. 



35 

TEXT BOOKS. 



Notb.— The first column gives the special prices at which the books are offered to our students 
in Springfield ; if ordered by mail or express, transportation will be extra. The second column 
gives the regular list prices. 

List No. i. 



Common to students of both departments. 


Special 


List. 


Robinson, English Harmony of the Gospels, 




^•35 


$1.50 


Handbook of Young Men's Christian Associations 






— Edition of 1891, 


(about) 


2.00 




Hopkins, Outline Study of Man, 




i-55 


i-75 


" Law of Love and Love as a Law, 




*-35 


1-75 


Morton, Handbook of First Aid, 




.25* 


• 2 5 


Roberts, Rules of Order, 




•55 


•75 


List No. 2. 








In addition to List No. i, the Secretarial Department 






students will use the following : 








Smith, Old and New Testament Histories (Harp- 






er's Student Series), 2 vols., each, 




1.04 


I - 2 5 


Fisher, History of the Christian Church, 




2.50 


3-5° 


Rhetoric, 


(about) 


I-25t 




Martin, Human Body (Briefer Course), 




1.20 


1.50 


List No. 3. 








In addition to List No. i, the Physical Department 






students will use the following : 








Gould, Medical Dictionary, 




3.00 


3-25 


Gray, Anatomy, 




5-4o 


6.00 


Balfour Sewart, Elements of Physics, 




r.io 


*- 2 5 


Martin, Human Body (large edition), 




2.20 


2.75 


Hygiene, 


(about) 


i.2St 




Acton, Reproductive Organs, 




1.80 


2.00 


Gymnastics, 




.90 


I.OO 


Lagrange, Physiology of Bodily Exercise, 




1.60 


i-75 


Page, Physical Diagnosis, 




1.80 


2.00 


Murrell, Massage as a Mode of Treatment, 




i-35 


1.50 


Schaible, Systematic Training of the Body, 




2.00* 


2.00 



*No discount from list prices. 
tBook not decided upon. 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 



Inquiries concerning the finances will receive immediate atten- 
tion if addressed to Oliver C. Morse, Secretary International 
Y. M. C. A. Training School, Springfield, Mass., and remittances 
may be made payable to his order. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath to the International Young Men's Christian 
Association Training School, Springfield, Mass., the sum of 
dollars.* 



BEQUEST FOR ENDOWMENT. 



I give and bequeath to the International Young Men's Christian 
Association Training School, Springfield, Massachusetts, the sum 
of , to be safely invested by them and called 

the Fund. The interest of this fund to be 

applied to the use of the School.'* 



PERPETUAL LOAN FUND. 



For the purpose of founding a perpetual loan fund in the Inter- 
national Young Men's Christian Association Training School, 
Springfield, Mass. (or either of its departments, if so stated), I 
hereby give the sum of five thousand dollars — or its equivalent in 
good securities at cash value — to be safely invested by them, the 
income to be loaned toward the education of students who have 
already shown ability in the School. 

* Or the testator may specify, towards the current expenses ; or towards the support of 
a chair of instruction in the general course, or in either of the departments ; or to be used 
as a loan towards the education of students who have shown ability in either of the 
departments. 



FOR GENERAL INFORMATION 



concerning the School or its finances, apply to 

Oliver C. Morse, Secretary Int. Y. M. C. A. Training School, 
Springfield, Mass. 



FOR SPECIAL INFORMATION 

concerning the work of the Departments, address : 

J. T. Bowne, Supt. Secretarial Dept., 35 Clarendon St. 
Luther Gulick, M.D., Supt. Physical Dept., 153 Westminster St. 
Springfield, Mass.